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Waiting for the Robert E. Lee
Canda Free Press ^ | July 27, 2013 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 07/27/2013 2:58:07 PM PDT by BigReb555

During my childhood of the 50s, songs like “Swanee River”, “Mammy” and “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee”, all best sung by the late great Al Jolson, were very popular in the South and throughout the USA.

(Excerpt) Read more at canadafreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: america; civilwar; confederacy; confederates; dixie; music; rel; robertelee; songs; south; union; yankees
Winston Churchill once said, "The most beautiful voice in the world is that of an educated Southern woman.”

The Sons of Confederate Veterans, www.scv.org, hosted their 118th National Reunion during the month of July, 2013 in Vicksburg, Mississippi and Christine Barr an award-winning professor of English and resident of Katy, Texas wrote a beautiful article about the SCV Convention and Southern Heritage. Read more at:

http://www.parispi.net/articles/2013/07/22/opinion/columns/doc51ed6358c8449269901895.txt

Do you remember the movie and the actor who said, “I give you our homeland, glorious in defeat, gallant in victory and brave in her hour of grief…Gentlemen, I give you the South and confusion to all her enemies?” See the answer at end of article.

You ain’t just whistling Dixie; I’m American by birth and Southern by the grace of God and….

Do you remember when men and women of African, Asian, European, Hispanic, Jewish, Oriental and American-Indian ancestry were proud to be Americans? In the peach state, we are Georgia Crackers, love catfish and hush puppies, miss Lewis Grizzard and stand up when the band plays the National Anthem or Dixie. We once even had a baseball team called the “Atlanta Crackers” but still love RC Cola and moon pies, fly Delta and read “Uncle Remus” stories to our children.

A young Southern lady recently told me that songs like “Dixie” and “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee” offended some people and probably why they should not be played. The question today might be are we still the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave or have we become the land of the offended and home of always complaining people?

It seems like some folks are offended by anything they don’t understand, while others aren’t offended but are afraid to speak up in fear of being called racist…But, then there are many brave folks who proudly stand up for what they believe is right.

During my childhood of the 50s, songs like “Swanee River”, “Mammy” and “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee”, all best sung by the late great Al Jolson, were very popular in the South and throughout the USA. At my elementary school we sang songs that included a Southern--War Between the States song “Goober Peas.” There are probably some who have a problem with this song about Confederate soldiers sitting of the road side and eating goober peas—peanuts…But, even Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce, played by Alan Alda, on the 70s hit TV show “Mash” sang this song in one of those many memorable episodes.

Do you remember the grand finally in the 1941 movie “Babes on Broadway” starring Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland? The song performed was “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee” written by Louis Wolfe Gilbert and Lewis Muir that include these words:

“Way down on the levy in old Alabamy, there’s Daddy and Mammy, there’s Ephraim and Sammy. On a moonlight night you can find them while they are waiting, the banjos are syncopating what’s that they’re saying. What’s that they’re saying? While they keep playing a-humming and swaying it’s the good ship Robert E. Lee.”

As a child my Mother woke my sister and me on schools days with such wonderful songs such as: “zippy de doo dah” from the 1946 Disney movie “Song of the South.”

The answer to the question at beginning of this article is the great Lionel Barrymore in the classic 1935 Fox movie “The Little Colonel” also starring the delightful Shirley Temple.

You all come back now, you here!

1 posted on 07/27/2013 2:58:07 PM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555
Despite the media stereotypes of Southerners as gap-toothed hicks, hood-wearing racists, and inbred cracker NASCAR addicts with shotgun racks in the backs of their beat-up pickups, I've found a deep respect for the pride and traditions of the South, and would esteem the average Southerner every bit as honorable as his or her Northern counterpart, and moreso than most.

Hats off to my Suth'n Bruth'n.

By the way, in the coming war, this time I'm on your side.

2 posted on 07/27/2013 3:04:30 PM PDT by IronJack (=)
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To: BigReb555

My late wife danced and sang in their high school play. She once sang it for me and I recall one was “Waiting on the Robert E. Lee”.


3 posted on 07/27/2013 3:17:10 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: yarddog

Or was it “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee”?


4 posted on 07/27/2013 3:18:42 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: IronJack

On behalf of all of your true Southern brethren, thank you!

LLS


5 posted on 07/27/2013 3:39:39 PM PDT by LibLieSlayer (FROM MY COLD, DEAD HANDS!)
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To: BigReb555

While in grade school in the 50’s we went to the auditorium for assembly about once a week, for singing. We used the “little Golden Songbook”, containing songs like, “Massa’s in de cold, cold ground”, “ Old Black Joe”, and “Dixie” among others, like, “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again”, “Suanne River”, and “Onward Christian Soldiers”.

We sang them proud, and loud, with the full blessing of the school and the teachers.


6 posted on 07/27/2013 3:54:05 PM PDT by FrankR (They will become our ultimate masters the day we surrender the 2nd Amendment.)
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To: BigReb555

This article made me recall a time years ago. I had to take a one credit course to graduate from college called “Music Appreciation.” I was surprised to find it very interesting. But one thing I heard was that if you want to find out what the people at any time in history were thinking about - listen to their music of the time. He pointed out that during the early 1800’s the “ Negro Spirituals” told of hard work - “lift that bale, tote that bar, get a little drunk and you land in jail.” There was no music that spoke to cruelty and torture.


7 posted on 07/27/2013 3:58:20 PM PDT by elpadre (AfganistaMr Obama said the goal was to "disrupt, dismantle and defeat al-hereQaeda" and its allies.)
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To: elpadre
Negro Spirituals” told of hard work - “lift that bale, tote that bar, get a little drunk and you land in jail.”

Those lyrics are not from a Negro Spiritual. They are from "Ol' Man River", a song by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein, written in 1927, from the musical "Show Boat".

8 posted on 07/27/2013 4:01:56 PM PDT by Publius
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To: BigReb555

9 posted on 07/27/2013 4:19:04 PM PDT by BlueDragon (...and if my thought dreams, could be seen, They'd probably put my head, in a guillotine...)
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To: BigReb555

“Virgil, quick some see...”


10 posted on 07/27/2013 4:19:59 PM PDT by bigbob
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To: BigReb555

“In the peach state, we are Georgia Crackers, love catfish and hush puppies, miss Lewis Grizzard and stand up when the band plays the National Anthem or Dixie. We once even had a baseball team called the “Atlanta Crackers” but still love RC Cola and moon pies, fly Delta and read “Uncle Remus” stories to our children. “

Dang straight!


11 posted on 07/27/2013 4:27:46 PM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: BigReb555

12 posted on 07/27/2013 4:28:31 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: BigReb555
Small typo, my friend.

"You all come back now, you here hear! "

13 posted on 07/27/2013 4:29:30 PM PDT by BwanaNdege ("To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize"- Voltaire)
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To: Publius; elpadre
Old Man River--The Revelers (1928)
(Political Incorrectness Warning)
14 posted on 07/27/2013 4:33:11 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: BigReb555

IBTH!
In before the haters!


15 posted on 07/27/2013 4:39:36 PM PDT by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: BlueDragon
The night they drove 'Ol Dixie down The Band

This is my favorite version of the tune. You'll notice that the lyrics are somewhat different.

The Day Conny Kramer Died--Juliane Werding (1972)

16 posted on 07/27/2013 4:40:14 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: IronJack
Stay Out of the South--The Coon-Sanders Nighthawks (1928)
17 posted on 07/27/2013 4:47:32 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: Fiji Hill

“...In 1972, a cover of the song called “Am Tag als Conny Kramer starb” (translation: “On the Day that Conny Kramer Died”) was a number-one hit in West Germany for singer Juliane Werding. For this version, the lyrics were not translated but rather changed completely to an anti-drug anthem about a young man dying because of his drug addiction...”


18 posted on 07/27/2013 4:55:03 PM PDT by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: Repeal The 17th

Hater here. Born in the South, always lived in the South, love the South. Absolutely hate the Zip E Doo Dah South, Happy Darky South, purposefully mispronouncing words or misspelling to be “Southern”, picking cotton South, being behind a mule South, professional Civil War loser Southerners, Big Daddy South, and down in the lowest pit with the Zip E Doo Dahers—no air conditioning South.


19 posted on 07/27/2013 5:02:06 PM PDT by AceMineral (One day the people will beg for chains.)
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To: AceMineral

I embrace it all.
It is all a part of who I am.
Don’t be a hater!


20 posted on 07/27/2013 5:08:06 PM PDT by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: Repeal The 17th

After 1972, I never heard “Conny Kramer” again until Youtube came along.


21 posted on 07/27/2013 5:27:54 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: BigReb555
During my childhood of the 50s, songs like “Swanee River”, “Mammy” and “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee”, all best sung by the late great Al Jolson, were very popular in the South and throughout the USA. At my elementary school we sang songs that included a Southern--War Between the States song “Goober Peas.” ..., even Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce, played by Alan Alda, on the 70s hit TV show “Mash” sang this song in one of those many memorable episodes.

I'm 100% Yankee, but I have a question. The 1945 film "Rhapsody in Blue", concerning the life of George Gershwin, starred Alan Alda's father as Gershwin and Al Jolson as himself, and featured the song "Swanee".

I recently saw a clip from this movie and I was wondering: "Why would a New Yorker like Gershwin write a song about the South?"

And besides the fact that it is a very catchy tune and Jolson sang it, why would it go over so well with Northeners?

22 posted on 07/27/2013 5:42:55 PM PDT by wideminded
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To: Repeal The 17th

Mostly I hate the poverty and backwardness of the South at that time. I hate that people took advantage of that poverty and backwardness for their own amusement and profit. I also hate that Southerners allowed themselves to be taken advantage of.

They should have said, “screw the magnolias and moonlight, we’re building railroads, steel mills, automobile factories, and skyscrapers”.


23 posted on 07/27/2013 6:26:40 PM PDT by AceMineral (One day the people will beg for chains.)
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To: AceMineral

“...I hate that people took advantage of that poverty and backwardness for their own amusement and profit...”
-
Such as it ever was, since the beginning of time, and on through the present.


24 posted on 07/27/2013 6:34:45 PM PDT by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: wideminded

Then read up on what inspired Gerschwin to write “Porgy and Bess”, a musical about the Gullah people of Charleston & the Lowcountry of South Carolina. Its universal appeal is simply the hallmark of great art.

Even this Southerner doesn’t believe that New Yorkers are somehow locked into their own special world.


25 posted on 07/27/2013 6:39:34 PM PDT by elcid1970 ("The Second Amendment is more important than Islam.")
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To: wideminded
I'm 100% Yankee, but I have a question. The 1945 film "Rhapsody in Blue", concerning the life of George Gershwin, starred Alan Alda's father as Gershwin and Al Jolson as himself, and featured the song "Swanee".

I recently saw a clip from this movie and I was wondering: "Why would a New Yorker like Gershwin write a song about the South?"

And besides the fact that it is a very catchy tune and Jolson sang it, why would it go over so well with Northeners?

In the early part of the twentieth century, the South came to be romantically portrayed as a land of sunshine full of happy, friendly people where life was simple, relaxed and slow-paced--in contrast to the hectic pace of life in the industrialized North. Here are a few hit songs that reflect that view:


26 posted on 07/27/2013 6:46:50 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: BigReb555
ROBERT E LEE
27 posted on 07/27/2013 7:16:15 PM PDT by Donald Rumsfeld Fan (The)
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To: BigReb555
LAST SCENE AL JOLSON STORY starring Larry Parks...Jolson's voice dubbed in
28 posted on 07/27/2013 8:06:09 PM PDT by Donald Rumsfeld Fan (The)
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To: AceMineral
Mostly I hate the poverty and backwardness of the South at that time. I hate that people took advantage of that poverty and backwardness for their own amusement and profit. I also hate that Southerners allowed themselves to be taken advantage of.

They should have said, “screw the magnolias and moonlight, we’re building railroads, steel mills, automobile factories, and skyscrapers”.

But railroads, steel mills, automobile factories and skyscrapers were built in the South precisely because Southerners allowed themselves to be taken advantage of. The "poverty and backwardness" of the region made for lower operating costs, a major reason that entrepreneurs have been attracted to the South--from the steel makers in the nineteenth century and textile manufacturers in the twentieth to the car makers of today.

29 posted on 07/28/2013 6:49:30 AM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: AceMineral

If were given a choice to live in a free agrarian republic or a centralized corporate federal leviathan I would gladly chose the former.


30 posted on 07/28/2013 6:55:25 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Fiji Hill

What we got was the KKK, sharecroppers, Tobacco Road, mammies, Big Daddies. What was going on in Cleveland, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, and all along the Great Lakes should have been going on in the South. Sure we got a steel mill in Birmingham and a auto plant in Atlanta. Crumbs! People from Europe should have been flocking to Norfolk, Charleston, or Savannah, and not New York City.


31 posted on 07/28/2013 9:26:11 AM PDT by AceMineral (One day the people will beg for chains.)
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To: AceMineral
What we got was the KKK, sharecroppers, Tobacco Road, mammies, Big Daddies...

...and Democrats.

32 posted on 07/28/2013 12:10:30 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: Fiji Hill

Actually the Souths problem with democrats started with the slavrocrisy and jeff davis.


33 posted on 07/28/2013 12:45:46 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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