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The Ultimate Punishment
Townhall.com ^ | August 25, 2013 | Derek Hunter

Posted on 08/25/2013 5:04:17 AM PDT by Kaslin

This week has pissed me off. It’s been a week filled with news I’d rather forget, but really, it’s one we all should remember. It should be a rallying cry, an opportunity for those interested in justice to reform a broken system and expedite a punishment reserved for a deserving few.


A college baseball player from Australia was murdered in Duncan, Okla., because three monsters were bored. The sheer convergence of bad parenting required to bring these three together and have none of them, not one, object to the idea of murdering a random stranger for lack of anything to do is as criminal as their murderous act. Their parents should sit in court next to them, charged as accessories.

The mother of Chancey Luna, one of the accused, told an Australian TV reporter she knew her son didn’t do this because he was home at the time – she saw him. A few minutes later, she said she knew in her “heart” he couldn’t have done this. If I had a child accused of something so heinous and I had an iron-clad alibi like “I was with him at the time,” that’s all I would be saying. That’s not what she’s saying. She’s saying he’s too respectful to have done something like this. But he, like every child, “likes to fight.” Sick.

Chancey wasn’t born evil. He became that way either through horrible parenting or horribly neglectful parenting. Whatever the case, this woman and her counterparts who created the other two evil bipeds should sit in prison with their progeny, released only after they’re put to a justifiable death. Let the parents live the rest of their miserable lives with the pain their creatures imposed on the family of Christopher Lane.

Then we move to Spokane, Wash.

Delbert Belton is a hero. Well, Delbert Belton was a hero. On Wednesday night, Belton, an 88-year-old veteran of World War II, became a victim of two teenage sub-human animals who beat him to death for reasons unknown. Belton, wounded in the Battle of Okinawa, was heading to a regular pool game he played weekly with his caregiver when these wastes of human flesh attacked him. He died the next day.

As of this writing, one of these beings has been arrested, the other remains at large (hopefully to be slowly run over by a steamroller or eaten alive by small woodland creatures rather than be taken into custody). May they both be slowly fed into wood chippers one appendage at a time starting with the one between their legs.

As for why these disgusting displays of inhumanity happened, I don’t care. I don’t want to understand these monsters, I want to eliminate them. May they be removed from the gene pool before they have a chance to infect it with their DNA.

Oklahoma and Washington have the death penalty, but they aren’t Texas. Waiting for justice to happen in death penalty cases has become an inexcusably long process for families of victims. From 1984 to 2006, the average number of months spent on death row has increased from 74 to 145. Waiting more than 12 years for justice to be done is, in many cases, longer than the lives of the victims these killers took to get there in the first place.

In 1981, progressive hero Mumia Abu-Jamal murdered Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner during a traffic stop of Mumia’s brother. He shot Officer Faulkner point-blank in the face. He was sentenced to death for this disgusting murder in 1982, but anti-justice crusaders and liberal politicians and celebrities managed to deny the Faulkner family the justice they deserved and the law demanded. In 2011, Abu-Jamal’s death sentence was commuted to life in prison without the possibility of parole. He’d spent 30 years on death row when he only allowed Daniel Faulkner to live 26. Only to the most disgusting corners of the progressive mind can this be seen as “justice.”

But that is what progressives call it – justice. Collecting money from co-workers, friends and family members of a murder victim to provide housing, food, cable, Internet and education to the person who took a loved one from their lives – to them, that is justice.

The death penalty needs reforming. Just as the introduction of DNA evidence has freed many innocent people from death row, it also should have decreased the wait time for execution. That would be justice. But the goal of the anti-justice progressive movement is the abolition of the death penalty, not its effective use.

Whether you believe in an afterlife or not, the death penalty is the greatest equalizer for justice for society’s greatest monsters. If you believe this world is all there is, that when you die you’re done, then a bad day in prison is better than not existing at all. If you believe in Hell, the worst day in prison is better than the best day in Hell.

Some people knowingly do things that forfeit their right to experience even the bad things in life. And given the existence of prison weddings and conjugal visits, the sooner we weed these creatures from the herd the better. Progressives will tell you the death penalty doesn’t deter crime, and that’s true. It’s also irrelevant. Some people are so evil and/or stupid that they don’t care that they’ll be executed for their actions. But where the death penalty works, where it has a 100 percent success rate, is recidivism. No executed criminal has ever harmed another innocent human being.

We had two examples of sub-human activity that is deserving of the ultimate penalty – five people whose actions should be met with the absolute justice we can bestow. They probably won’t get it. A deal will be cut, or even if they do they’ll live long, unproductive lives on the public dole.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: chrislane; deathpenalty; justice

1 posted on 08/25/2013 5:04:17 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin
As time goes on and as more heinous crimes of these types are committed and go unpunished, eventually we will revert to the Wild West frontier, unfortunately, taking the law into our own hands. Maybe that is why Homeland Security is buying up so much ammo?
I am not advocating taking the law into our own hands but there will be a breaking point where the public demands protection & punishment immediately or they will become a mass of angry mobs, meting out the punsihment the system was too forgiving or soft to do. We will be in a MAD MAX scenario by then...
2 posted on 08/25/2013 5:25:39 AM PDT by Netz
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To: Kaslin

Good article and I totally agree. “An eye for an eye” would work just fine for me, just don’t delay it for an entire life time.


3 posted on 08/25/2013 5:28:08 AM PDT by DaveA37
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To: Kaslin

I must demur with “Chancey wasn’t born evil.”

Unfortunately we are all born evil.

Judeo-Christian theology traces this back to events soon after the creation of mankind. The bible furnishes a few concrete details, and it reads much like a pan-human soul conspiracy to embrace a lie that one could spiritually stand on one’s own apart from God. This realization isn’t just gratuitous guilt-tripping. It is a realization that we have all been saying no to the blessings of God. And saying no to blessings means that what remains is — that’s right — curses. There is no neutral spiritual zone. Doing an attitude turn-around, with the help of God, opens us up to blessings where curses had prevailed in the past.

Still, to fail to recognize the gravity of the situation is to become more lost in evil ourselves. Forget for a moment the specifics of how this might be punished by other sinners on earth — the most fundamental problem is that people act as if there is no God to be accountable to or reconciled with.


4 posted on 08/25/2013 5:28:22 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (The Lion of Judah will roar again if you give him a big hug and a cheer and mean it. See my page.)
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To: Kaslin
As this country moves closer and closer to becoming a third world nation, we will start seeing less justice and more just-us. Then, I suspect we shall see a revival of Vigilance Committees and other vigilante groups. Once more ustice will be swift and yes, probably with a few more mistakes.
5 posted on 08/25/2013 5:37:21 AM PDT by Tupelo (There are no Republicans or Democrats in Washington. Just Millionaires protecting their turf.)
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To: Netz
The lack of justice in the inner-city (largely due to “liberal” policies) is one of the driving forces in the huge homicide rates in places like Chicago. “If they got on of ours,we'll get one of theirs.”)

Oldplayer

6 posted on 08/25/2013 5:45:06 AM PDT by oldplayer
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To: Kaslin
As for why these disgusting displays of inhumanity happened, I don’t care. I don’t want to understand these monsters, I want to eliminate them. May they be removed from the gene pool before they have a chance to infect it with their DNA.

Ah, the Van Helsing Doctrine. And I suggest everyone re-read Stoker's incomparable novel, and this time with an eye toward its true meaning, which is the struggle of humanity against evil.

7 posted on 08/25/2013 5:49:25 AM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham (I'll retire to Bedlam.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Unfortunately we are all born evil.

Yes, in the sense that we are born with no concept of good. It requires many years of constant education, most of it by example, to inculcate the qualities of good into the unmoulded clay that is an infant.

8 posted on 08/25/2013 5:51:27 AM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham (I'll retire to Bedlam.)
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To: Kaslin

Sorry...how does the writer know that many criminals aren’t born evil? Do you think Jeffrey Dahmer’s parents taught him how to be a cannibal and a mass murderer. The myth that somehow many people aren’t born evil has to be exposed. Yes...some people are born evil. By claiming that being a good person is all societal indoctrination, these scribblers are saying we’re all basically born with blank slates or tabula rasas. That theory has been thoroughly debunked for decades. Society can enact laws that make it tougher for some people to act out their evil impulses, but it can only do so much.


9 posted on 08/25/2013 5:52:29 AM PDT by driftless2
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To: oldplayer

This is the behavior exhibited daily in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Iran and many other nations, it should NOT be so in the once “Melting Pot” nation.

I sit in Israel, sorrounded by insane Arabs and yet, I read about “8 killed, 37 wounded over the weekend in Chicago” - every weekend?

Who is nuts?


10 posted on 08/25/2013 5:56:34 AM PDT by Netz
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To: Kaslin
Progressives will tell you the death penalty doesn’t deter crime, and that’s true. It’s also irrelevant.

While as a philosophical matter I agree with the death penalty, do we really want to put that weapon against the criminally accused into the hands of Eric Holder, Angela Corey, Mike Nifong, Eliot Spitzer, Bill Lockyer, Scott Harshbarger, and a number of other rogue prosecutors whose only concern is their conviction rate and their political viability, your innocence be damned?

I will answer that question for you - NO!!

11 posted on 08/25/2013 6:04:19 AM PDT by Hardastarboard (Buck Off, Bronco Bama)
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To: Mr Ramsbotham; HiTech RedNeck; Kaslin

Yes we are all born evil.

None of us is more than a heartbeat away from committing the most heinous crime we can imagine.

Some of the responses here, and some of the responses of my own heart, in articulating what should be done with those who act on their evil imaginations, reveal just how evil we all really are.

The difference is whether a person acts on his evil imaginations.

I have known some children born into really good Christian homes that end up committed to living evil lives, even while their siblings are committed to Christ.

Ultimately, God allows us all to make our own choices. Some people are just inclined to make the wrong ones.

And, yes, the murderers must be put to death, if for no other reason than to prevent them from doing it again.


12 posted on 08/25/2013 6:19:04 AM PDT by Westbrook (Children do not divide your love, they multiply it.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
I have to disagree with you that we are all born evil
13 posted on 08/25/2013 6:33:22 AM PDT by Kaslin (He needed the ignorant to reelect him, and he got them. Now we all have to pay the consequenses)
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To: Netz
...but there will be a breaking point where the public demands protection...

Assuming those in that "public" don't have the balls or do not their state's permission to protect themselves.

Don't go unarmed.

14 posted on 08/25/2013 6:48:51 AM PDT by CPOSharky ((The government way) If it ain't broke, fix it till it is.)
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To: CPOSharky
...better watch what your saying. The Thought Police have already picked up your brainwaves...I can see their report:

APB for Armed Neanderthal Biped (ANB), possesses independent deterrent. Arrest immediately.

15 posted on 08/25/2013 6:57:57 AM PDT by Netz
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To: Kaslin
First, the writer is wrong about the Death Penalty as a deterrent. Study after study demonstrates that it is.

Second, all this confusion about whether some or all humans are born evil or good can be really confusing, but it shouldn't be. Some, liberals in particular, believe people are "basically good." And too many conservatives misinterpret scripture and quickly adopt a reactionary view, that "original sin" means people are born evil. But the scriptures teaches "know" both.

More to the point, we are born "knowing good and evil," and, deny it though we will, we are therefore responsible, whether we choose to acknowledge or try to escape this awesome responsibility.

When a cat tortures a mouse to death we rightly assume the cat is probably just doing his natural born thing. But when people do the same thing we consider that person a criminal or psychotic, and we rightly say they are responsible for evil. The knowledge and the perception of good and evil do not make us good or evil, only responsible for how we choose to act.

16 posted on 08/25/2013 7:06:22 AM PDT by Prospero (Si Deus trucido mihi, ego etiam fides Deus.)
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To: Netz

“...unfortunately, taking the law into our own hands.”

Hmmm, I see nothing unfortunate about that.


17 posted on 08/25/2013 10:11:26 AM PDT by SgtHooper (The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

“Unfortunately we are all born evil.”

No, we are born sinners—a big difference.


18 posted on 08/25/2013 10:12:20 AM PDT by SgtHooper (The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list.)
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To: Westbrook
Some of the responses here, and some of the responses of my own heart, in articulating what should be done with those who act on their evil imaginations, reveal just how evil we all really are.

That's one of the worst parts of conservatism among people who pride themselves in being conservative and yet don't really have an appreciation of what the term signifies--particularly some who plume themselves on their Christianity.

19 posted on 08/25/2013 10:15:22 AM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham (I'll retire to Bedlam.)
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To: Kaslin

Disagree with the bible then, if you must. From the Old Testament, “God created man upright, but men have gone after many schemes.” And from the New Testament, “We sinned in Adam.”

Understanding that this is our common position is key to understanding the need for the redemption from God, not just a “nice life on earth.”


20 posted on 08/25/2013 12:02:17 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (The Lion of Judah will roar again if you give him a big hug and a cheer and mean it. See my page.)
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To: Mr Ramsbotham

This is true enough.

We do well to be concerned about sin. Sin represents a compromise of God’s grace. This world is not a place completely bereft of God’s grace; to find such a place one would have to visit hell itself.

We also do well to recognize that when God imparts new, divinely based righteousness to those who turn back to Him for help once they understand there is nowhere else to go for help with their sinful failures, this righteousness pushes away sin. These are the “yes” promises of the gospel and they are more powerful than any “no” warning of the law. Jesus came, among other things, to show that this principle works to a T.

We can’t disregard the “no” warnings because they show us where we need to stop and ask the Lord for more help, which He will do without grudge. Sometimes this means we suffer chastisement, though the earlier we come to the Lord the less likely we will have to suffer greatly.

The ultimate punishment of banishment to hell is something that humans have no power to inflict. Ending the earthly life of, say, a person who murdered is not the end of the story for that person as far as the Lord is concerned. It is permitted however, as this is a picture of banishment to hell. Sometimes humanity needs the pictures in order to get the point.


21 posted on 08/25/2013 12:12:45 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (The Lion of Judah will roar again if you give him a big hug and a cheer and mean it. See my page.)
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To: SgtHooper

Sinners without redemption are sent to hell... God would not do that with someone who is “not evil.”

We take our nicest existence here as normal. No in heavenly eyes it is not normal! It is needy and beggarly and by our own will too. We are in a place demoted from heaven, but in which God still maintains the spirit for a second chance by pure mercy.


22 posted on 08/25/2013 12:22:40 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (The Lion of Judah will roar again if you give him a big hug and a cheer and mean it. See my page.)
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To: Kaslin

“The human heart is the most deceitful of all things, and desperately wicked. Who really knows how bad it is?”
Jeremiah 17:9

No doubt about it.


23 posted on 08/26/2013 7:15:19 AM PDT by jodyel
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To: SgtHooper

See my post 23.

Sin/evil...same thing in God’s eyes.


24 posted on 08/26/2013 7:17:28 AM PDT by jodyel
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