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Is America Still "Pro-Business"?
Townhall.com ^ | August 25, 2013 | Austin Hill

Posted on 08/25/2013 6:46:15 AM PDT by Kaslin

The day started with an American CEO ringing the opening bell at the NASDAQ in New York. And it ended with that same CEO announcing plans to cut his company’s American workforce.

It was Friday, August 9th. Mark Durcan, CEO of the global Micron Technology, Inc. had traveled from the company’s headquarters in Boise, Idaho to visit the NASDAQ trading epicenter in Times Square. The company has been enjoying good news over the past several months, including a rise in its’ stock value, additional contracts to sell its’ computer memory systems to additional tablet manufacturers, and its’ recent acquisition of the Hiroshima, Japan based Elpida Corporation. Ringing the bell at the stock exchange seemed like a great way to cap-off a string of celebration-worthy events.

But late in the day on August 7th, and continuing through August 8th, an internal memo from Mr. Durcan began circulating to Micron’s American-based employees (the company has operations throughout the North American continent, including the states of California, Colorado, Idaho, Virginia, Minnesota, Texas and Utah). In announcing what was described as a “workforce optimization” plan, Durcan noted to employees that “steps like these to improve efficiency and competitiveness are difficult, but our business is heading in a positive direction and we must build the foundation for a bright future. Success will not be achieved without some tough decisions, and this is one of those.”

The “steps” amounted to an across-the-board reduction in Micron’s workforce. But this wasn’t aimed at Micron employees worldwide – no, it’s a reduction in the company’s American workforce specifically. Durcan was offering a generous severance package to those who voluntarily wanted to leave, and if the company’s American workforce reduction goals aren’t met within a specified time frame then official “layoffs” will be the next step. Over the next ten days, entire departments within Micron’s U.S. operations were told in essence, “here’s your severance package offer, if you don’t take it your position may still be eliminated later.”

Micron, by the way, is a great American business success story. Begun at the dawn of the new “computer revolution” era in 1978 with, among others, some very young and eager graduates of hometown Boise State University, it would eventually be infused with investment capital from a billionaire Idaho potato grower named J.R. Simplott on its way to becoming a publicly traded global enterprise.

Like other players in the highly competitive computer memory industry, Micron has had its ups and downs over the decades. Job layoffs have happened before within the company, and twice last decade – first during the post “Nine-Eleven” recession of 2001 and then during the “great recession” of 2009 – former CEO Steve Appleton chose to sacrifice his entire salary as a means of helping restore profits during lean times. Through it all the company has re-distributed portions of its profits in to its own charitable “Micron Foundation,” and has donated regularly to arts programs, and to both public and private colleges and universities to support tech education.

But this time Micron’s “unfortunate news” is different. The company isn’t merely reducing its’ workforce. This time Micron is specifically cutting jobs in America, even as it will soon be expanding its employment base in Japan. Forget trying to explain to the community organizers in our country about the company executives’ “fiduciary responsibilities” - one can imagine that President Barack Obama and lots of disingenuous members of Congress might soon make an example of Micron and unleash talking points lamenting the company’s “un-patriotic” behavior and then vow to “crackdown” (whatever that means) on those dastardly American companies that are “shipping jobs overseas.”

But Americans need to wake up and realize that it’s the policies of these disingenuous politicians that are leading the United States to become a lousy place to do business. The U.S. has the highest corporate taxation rate of any country in the world right now. Japan lowered its corporate income tax rate from 39.5 percent to 37 percent in 2012, and now the Japanese legislature is talking about lowering it even further.

And then, of course, there’s Obamacare. The President’s signature policy initiative is driving insurance costs sky-high, and most of that burden is being carried by individual American workers and their employers. Companies whose CEO’s are on “good terms” with President Obama – companies like McDonalds and GE Corporation, for example – have gotten themselves exempted from the Obamacare horrors. Micron hasn’t received our dear President’s blessing, apparently, and so must make some moves to protect the interests of its’ investors.

Do Americans want a thriving economy that produces career opportunities and potentially productive lifestyles for all? Or do we simply want to continue in our fantasy-based pattern of believing politicians’ promises of “free” things as we pay no attention to their actual policies?

The choice is ours to make.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 08/25/2013 6:46:15 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

We’re a pro-moocher society.


2 posted on 08/25/2013 6:48:40 AM PDT by hometoroost
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To: Kaslin

America should not be “pro-business.” That’s the road to crony capitalism and favoritism.

American should be pro free market. The businesses can take care of themselves.


3 posted on 08/25/2013 6:50:00 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Kaslin
Bring back American jobs, to America.

Tax Micron's Japanese products.

4 posted on 08/25/2013 6:51:36 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: Kaslin
The U.S. has the highest corporate taxation rate of any country in the world right now.

Possibly true. However, with exemptions and deductions often highly misleading. Many corporations pay no tax to USA.

Comparing true average net rates would be interesting.

5 posted on 08/25/2013 6:51:39 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Kaslin

America has become (very) anti-Business.

We have done this by being very very cutthroat competitive within America.

But then farming off production to every country in the world, where we do not apply the same standards.

America is screwed, unless we bring back American production.

America first.


6 posted on 08/25/2013 6:53:01 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network
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To: Sherman Logan
Many corporations pay no tax to USA.

As folks often say, no corporation ever pays a tax. Their customers pay the tax for them as the product's price increases so that the tax bill can be paid.

And the concept of crony capitalism fits right it to this. I have friends in high places. I can have loopholes created in the laws. Regulation will hurt my competition, but I can be exempt. The politics is working in my favor, so my tax bill is less, therefore I can charge my customers less, therefore my business expands.

When corporate tax rates are high (as they are now) then crony capitalism (fascism) increases, and an anti-free market environment is constructed. Consumers suffer.

7 posted on 08/25/2013 7:01:34 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (21st century. I'm not a fan.)
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To: Kaslin

It looks to me that the People of America are pro business but big bus and government are pro dictatorship.


8 posted on 08/25/2013 7:02:45 AM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: Kaslin

“Fascism should rightly be called Corporatism,
as it is the merger of corporate and government power.”
- Benito Mussolini


9 posted on 08/25/2013 7:05:28 AM PDT by TArcher ("TO SECURE THESE RIGHTS, governments are instituted among men" -- Does that still work?)
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To: ClearCase_guy

As you say.

It’s a classic example of game theory. The economy as a whole thrives when tax rates are low and businesses must compete with each other by being more efficient or innovative.

Any given business, however, can thrive with less effort when rates are high simply by lobbying for exemptions or deductions, which comparatively handicap its competitors.


10 posted on 08/25/2013 7:06:41 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Kaslin
at large, yes.
11 posted on 08/25/2013 7:07:34 AM PDT by Drawn7979
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To: Kaslin

We should be free market not pro business.


12 posted on 08/25/2013 7:09:20 AM PDT by Bigtigermike
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To: TArcher

Eisenhower famously spoke about the “Military-Industrial complex”. Some folks thought that was about the Army and the defense contractors, more or less. But really it is a broad concept — that merging corporate and government power is a huge mistake and deprives we the people of our freedom. That way lies dictatorship. Eisenhower knew it.


13 posted on 08/25/2013 7:10:36 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (21st century. I'm not a fan.)
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To: Sherman Logan

Those businesses and industries that can afford the most lobbyists, make the right political donations, and engage in activities that further a political ideology whether or not it is feasible or profitable are the ones that receive the exemptions and deductions.


14 posted on 08/25/2013 7:11:04 AM PDT by Rusty0604
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To: mountainlion
With some notable exceptions, businessmen favor free enterprise in general but are opposed to it when it comes to themselves.
--Milton Friedman

15 posted on 08/25/2013 7:12:21 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

How about taxing Chinese Products instead?


16 posted on 08/25/2013 7:13:49 AM PDT by Kaslin (He needed the ignorant to reelect him, and he got them. Now we all have to pay the consequenses)
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To: 1rudeboy

I see your Friedman and raise you a Smith.

“People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.”

The government of his time was not in general involved in regulating business in detail, or he would surely have said the same about businessmen meeting with government officials.


17 posted on 08/25/2013 7:22:13 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Kaslin

Adam Smith again:

“To give the monopoly of the home-market to the produce of domestic industry, in any particular art or manufacture, is in some measure to direct private people in what manner they ought to employ their capitals, and must, in almost all cases, be either a useless or a hurtful regulation.”


18 posted on 08/25/2013 7:23:39 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: ClearCase_guy

>>That way lies dictatorship.

In the Old Testament is was named Ba’al.

Ba’al is a Hebrew word for Lord, Possessor, Master, Owner — typically manifested ala the merger of Commerce, Government, and Religion into a State of affairs where “COMMERCE BETWEEN MASTER AND SLAVE IS DESPOTISM”.

Same ol’.


19 posted on 08/25/2013 7:32:20 AM PDT by TArcher ("TO SECURE THESE RIGHTS, governments are instituted among men" -- Does that still work?)
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To: Kaslin; 1rudeboy; Sherman Logan; TArcher
To see how Obamanomics works on a national scale I highly recommend The Vampire Economy by Gunter Reimann. You can download it for free from many sources. Published in 1939, it is a survey of how the Nazi economy was structured and 'worked' in Hitler's pre-war Germany. You'll see much that is familiar. Fascism is, if I can improve Mussolini's characterization, the toxic merger of socialism and rentseeking crony capitalism.
20 posted on 08/25/2013 7:49:49 AM PDT by Paine in the Neck (Is John's moustache long enough YET?)
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To: TArcher
“Fascism should rightly be called Corporatism, as it is the merger of corporate and government power.”

Unfortunately for the leftist notion that Fascism meant rule by corporations, the business corporation was not (primarily) what Musso was talking about here.

The word "corporation" comes from a root meaning "body." The corporatism of the (Italian) Fascists was in theory rule by a host of citizen "bodies" including business corporations, but also including labor unions, professional associations, cooperatives, consumer groups, etc.

In theory it was a massive expansion of what we now call "public-private cooperation."

In practice it was of course nothing of the kind, and the wealthy had disproportionate influence, as they do in just about all forms of governance.

21 posted on 08/25/2013 7:59:15 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Paine in the Neck
Fascism is, if I can improve Mussolini's characterization, the toxic merger of socialism and rentseeking crony capitalism.

In theory, no. In practice, pretty much yes.

22 posted on 08/25/2013 8:00:24 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Paine in the Neck
>>You'll see much that is familiar.
 
http://www.google.com/#q=deutsche+bank+Argent+Mortgage

"Oops"
 
Yep.  
 
 

23 posted on 08/25/2013 8:01:55 AM PDT by TArcher ("TO SECURE THESE RIGHTS, governments are instituted among men" -- Does that still work?)
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To: Sherman Logan
In theory, no. In practice, pretty much yes.

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is." - Yogi Berra

24 posted on 08/25/2013 8:03:56 AM PDT by Paine in the Neck (Is John's moustache long enough YET?)
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To: Kaslin

Is America still pro business? No, not with 53% of us on welfare. The have nots enslaving the haves.


25 posted on 08/25/2013 8:08:50 AM PDT by conservativeimage.com (I Won't Go Underground http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wema3CNqzvg)
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To: Sherman Logan

>>The word “corporation” comes from a root meaning “body.”

Yah, I learned that a few years ago - when I took a course in “Corporate Worship” at Concordia (College) University.

That was about church services.

But it can also be seen in the repetitive manifestation of Ba’al in relation to the historical State that human nature inevitably manifests as part of its nature.


26 posted on 08/25/2013 8:10:18 AM PDT by TArcher ("TO SECURE THESE RIGHTS, governments are instituted among men" -- Does that still work?)
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To: Sherman Logan

Thank you. Clarity is beautiful.


27 posted on 08/25/2013 8:10:41 AM PDT by conservativeimage.com (I Won't Go Underground http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wema3CNqzvg)
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To: Kaslin
Labor traditionally resents capital. But in the past, the resentment was directed at large enterprises - the die-hard Socialist who despised the Rockefellers had no particular animosity toward Joe who ran the flower stand on the corner or Mary who owned the diner where the Socialist liked to eat lunch. He might have thought them deluded or misinformed, but he didn't see their small enterprises as the root of all evil.

Since the Sixties, that sentiment has been deliberately inverted. Big CEO's are now liberal rock stars, who jet around the world warning of the evils of global warming, host lavish fundraisers for Presidents and Senators, and transform their firms into quasi-governmental entities - complete with large HR departments ready to roll out the latest feminist or racial whim as both "humane" and iron-fisted company policy.

Meanwhile, almost unnoticed, laws and tax policy and even public attitudes have swung violently against smaller businesses who have nothing concrete to add to achieving Team Progressive's goals. When Progressives need to express their deep concern over a social issue, it's your shop windows the Black Bloc is going to smash - not Apple's. It's always sad to see affected owners on TV the next morning, expressing their certainty that the protestors somehow "got it wrong." They didn't...

Be a scammer who contributes big money to Team Progressive and, like Angelo Mozilo, all of your troubles will magically vanish. Be an honest business man who tries to compete in what's left of the free market and your wallet will be groped at by endless rent-seekers and political hacks, all of whom seem motivated by one goal: "Knock off this entrepreneurial nonsense and get yourself a nice, stable union or corporate job so we can control you."

28 posted on 08/25/2013 8:22:31 AM PDT by Mr. Jeeves (CTRL-GALT-DELETE)
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To: Sherman Logan

[American should be pro free market. The businesses can take care of themselves.]

Amen.

The business of American government is to secure the inalienable rights of the governed. Period.

From what?

From the natural state body of human governance:  Ba’al.

 

 

 

29 posted on 08/25/2013 8:23:28 AM PDT by TArcher ("TO SECURE THESE RIGHTS, governments are instituted among men" -- Does that still work?)
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To: Sherman Logan
"Crony captialism..." is the a political aberration not a free market component. The natural order of a "business" is to survive, profit, and succeed. Only by buying political and legislative favor can there be a crony capitalist element.

The continued meddling of the feds will only add to our demise. Small local businesses will devolve into off the books enterprises as the entrepreneur can always find a way to exist in any social order. It may not be pretty but that is where we are headed.

30 posted on 08/25/2013 9:05:45 AM PDT by Cannoneer (The problem IS that the purpose of power is to maintain power.)
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To: Cringing Negativism Network

Any time jobs are mentioned, I see you post these sentiments. It is not that I do not agree, but on the flip side, If I were a CEO I would have no issue whatsoever with moving jobs overseas to do my job. My job, as it were, would be to protect the interests of shareholders in a legal and ethical way.

There is no loyalty anymore. Workers are not loyal to employers and vice-versa. But, why should companies be loyal? They are not in business to provide jobs or to stimulate the economy. As long as voters, ie. workers, continue to vote for policies and politicians who raise taxes, and pass regulations making it too expensive to do business here, companies should continue to do what needs to be done to protect their bottom line.

Jobs will not be back in the USA until this changes, and I do not blame the corps one bit for moving them. And no, I do not care if they are making profits, that money belongs to shareholders and to anyone else the corp. sees fit to pay it to. Not to politicians or anyone else in the interests of “fairness”.


31 posted on 08/25/2013 7:14:36 PM PDT by BizBroker (There is no "radical Islam", there is only Islam itself.)
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To: Sherman Logan

Businesses hate competition, that’s why they have lobbyists, to beg the government to impose barriers to entry.


32 posted on 08/25/2013 7:15:29 PM PDT by dfwgator
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