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How Fracking Is Drying Up One Unlucky Texas Town
Yahoo.com ^ | 16 August 2013 | Douglas Main

Posted on 08/29/2013 4:11:37 PM PDT by Lorianne

If you had to choose between natural gas production or drinking water in your hometown, which would it be?

Some Texas residents feel they haven't been given this choice—and that hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is taking more than its fair share of their groundwater, exacerbating the drought problems in an already parched region. The Guardian recently reported on the predicament facing a small town in Barnhart, Texas—which "appears to have run dry because the water was being extracted for shale gas fracking."

And fracking appears to play a role in many of these water shortages elsewhere in the state. Another 30 towns in the state are expected to run out of water by the end of the year, according to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. And about 15 million people are under some form of water rationing, wherein they are prevented from watering their lawns and the like.

Beverly McGuire, a resident of Barnhart, told the Guardian that her wells ran dry soon after fracking started near her property two years ago. Another local rancher, Buck Owens, had to sell all of his 500 cattle and 90 percent of his goats because he didn't have enough water to feed them after fracking contractors drilled 104 wells on his land.

Other nearby residents with their own well water have been selling it for use in fracking, a process by which water and other chemicals are forcefully injected into the ground at high pressure to release pockets of oil and gas. In a nearby town, contractor Larry Baxter estimates he could make $36,000 per month selling water for fracking, he told the Guardian.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: agitprop; fracking; oilandgas; pravdamedia

1 posted on 08/29/2013 4:11:37 PM PDT by Lorianne
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To: Lorianne

Oh brother


2 posted on 08/29/2013 4:12:23 PM PDT by svcw (Stand or die)
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To: Lorianne

So in other words, people are pumping and selling the groundwater. Its not fracking, its pumping and selling groundwater. If this pumping of groundwater was being done for a bunch of swimming pools, I am sure the Guardian would have been just as concerned, right?


3 posted on 08/29/2013 4:14:02 PM PDT by AzSteven ("War is less costly than servitude, the choice is always between Verdun and Dachau." Jean Dutourd)
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To: Lorianne

$36K a month buys a lot of bottled water.


4 posted on 08/29/2013 4:14:06 PM PDT by RightOnTheBorder
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To: Lorianne

Therefore, ban fracking everywhere, forever! LOL


5 posted on 08/29/2013 4:14:23 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (I aim to raise a million plus for Gov. Palin. What'll you do?.)
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To: svcw

Depending on the characteristics of the underlying aquifer it makes perfect sense that pumping from 104 new wells in one location could exceed its recharge capacity.


6 posted on 08/29/2013 4:16:51 PM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: (optional, printed after your name on post))
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Russia and the Sauds would like that.


7 posted on 08/29/2013 4:17:05 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Lorianne

no mention of the substitution of butane in place of water.

These guys have no shame


8 posted on 08/29/2013 4:17:21 PM PDT by dila813
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To: Lorianne

Texas has what is know as the Law of the Deepest Well. Basically, if your well runs dry because your neighbor drilled a well it’s your own fault. You should have drilled a better well. The water, oil, gas, or whatever, does not belong to you until it flows into the bore of your well.


9 posted on 08/29/2013 4:17:36 PM PDT by SeeSharp
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To: Lorianne
And fracking appears to play a role in many of these water shortages elsewhere in the state.

Uh, no, we have what's called a drought. We need rain and lots of it.

10 posted on 08/29/2013 4:21:38 PM PDT by unixfox (Abolish Slavery, Repeal the 16th Amendment)
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To: Lorianne

Total BS.

Fracking is done far below the water table in sealed system.

The Obamay followers hate it that we are getting middle east oil and becoming self reliant. It does not follow their “Plan”.

The EPA could not justify their numbers and shut up and went away before it could be a black eye.

Yet some “toad” at the MSM wants a by line. No thanks. We get real news from abroad.


11 posted on 08/29/2013 4:22:11 PM PDT by hadaclueonce (dont worry about Mexico, put the fence around kalifornia.)
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To: Lorianne

Good grief...


12 posted on 08/29/2013 4:24:24 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: hadaclueonce

So, what’s the broad’s name that we should get the news from? I know. Not funny. Sorry. It’s nearing time for the Friday silliness thread.


13 posted on 08/29/2013 4:24:33 PM PDT by rktman (Inergalactic background checks? King hussein you're first up.)
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To: Lorianne

Finish the Keystone XL pipeline. Ignore the anti-competition NIMBYs.


14 posted on 08/29/2013 4:26:03 PM PDT by familyop
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To: Lorianne

http://www.northernoil.com/drilling-video

Got this link from another poster on another thread...shows that they go way below the water table and seal of the bore hole before continuing...


15 posted on 08/29/2013 4:26:22 PM PDT by SZonian (Throwing our allegiances to political parties in the long run gave away our liberty.)
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To: Lorianne

You have to read on down to find out that the area has been under an extended drought, too.


16 posted on 08/29/2013 4:28:43 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Tyranny is defined as that which is legal for the government but illegal for the people. T Jefferson)
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To: Lorianne

Thorium Reactors powering massive desalinsation on the coasts pumping massive amounts of fresh water BACK into the middle of continents.

Mwahahaha


17 posted on 08/29/2013 4:29:31 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: Lorianne
"The average well in the Marcellus Shale, a large area rich in oil and natural gas that stretches across the Appalachians in the eastern U.S., requires 4.2 million to five million gallons of water, the Journal reported."

So fracking requires using quite a bit of water. Tough time for that in the drought from Texas through the West. Make way for the Keystone XL pipeline.


18 posted on 08/29/2013 4:34:08 PM PDT by familyop
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To: Lorianne
104 wells paid HANDSOMELY to the property owner.

It's true fracking uses a LOT of water .. and it has to come from somewhere .. I'd like to know the company ... is it Fractech ?

19 posted on 08/29/2013 4:35:19 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: Lorianne

Living in a semi-arid region (ca. 20-22 inches annual precip, virtually none of it escaping the rooting zone by downward percolation), in a city pumping its domestic supply from an underground reservoir that is being steadily lowered and not recharged from any source, so far as can be discerned, one of the first thoughts that crossed my mind when I began reading about the fracking procedure was one of concern for the supply of water for other necessary purposes.
Believe me, bottled water is not a rational alternative.


20 posted on 08/29/2013 4:37:05 PM PDT by Elsiejay
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To: SZonian

Thanks for the video link. It was very informative.


21 posted on 08/29/2013 4:40:12 PM PDT by ThomasSawyer (Democratic Underground: Proof that anyone can figure out how to use a computer.)
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To: GraceG
Thorium Reactors powering massive desalinsation on the coasts pumping massive amounts of fresh water BACK into the middle of continents.

I like the cut of your jib, Grace. You post some of the best commentary around this place.

22 posted on 08/29/2013 4:43:44 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: Windflier

Thorium Reactors powering massive desalinsation on the coasts pumping massive amounts of fresh water BACK into the middle of continents.

I like the cut of your jib, Grace. You post some of the best commentary around this place.

My friends have accused me of having a weird way of thinking...

I tend to consider myself as an out of the box thinker, I use a lot of out of the box thinking and deductive reasoning in my daily life, I guess it spills over here.


23 posted on 08/29/2013 4:47:25 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: Lorianne

Sorry, there is already a revolutionary new fracking technology that uses CO2 and a tiny fraction of water to do the same thing that once required lots of water. Try again, libs.


24 posted on 08/29/2013 4:58:25 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: Elsiejay

Dam a stream and create a water source. It could also be used for clean, CHEAP electricity generation!

OH WAIT...
The Democrats haven’t let us build anything like that in several decades now.


25 posted on 08/29/2013 5:07:44 PM PDT by tcrlaf (Well, it is what the Sheeple voted for....)
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To: hadaclueonce

Agree- total BS. On top of it all, in TX all water belongs to TX so there are no such things as water rights.


26 posted on 08/29/2013 5:11:00 PM PDT by SteelTrap
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To: thackney

Ping.


27 posted on 08/29/2013 5:11:21 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four Fried Chickens and a Coke)
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To: Lorianne

Can they put in an irrigation system like the kind used on produce farms?


28 posted on 08/29/2013 5:19:58 PM PDT by hummingbird (Don't be afraid of the big words.)
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To: GraceG

They use brine for fracking... higher S.G.

No need to desalinate.

Though, technically, since we are building all this transloading infrastructure for RR tank cars, return unit crude oil tankcars could serve as water carriers on the backhaul.

Lord knows the Sierra Club would pitch a fit if a 36” water pipeline were to be built.


29 posted on 08/29/2013 5:30:25 PM PDT by Rodamala
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To: Rodamala

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323420604578652594214383364.html


30 posted on 08/29/2013 5:32:14 PM PDT by nascarnation (Democrats control the Presidency, Senate, and Media. It's an uphill climb....)
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To: Lorianne

” he didn’t have enough water to feed them after fracking contractors drilled 104 wells on his land.”

Bitching about them drilling water wells he was paid for?


31 posted on 08/29/2013 5:37:25 PM PDT by Figment
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To: Rebelbase

“Depending on the characteristics of the underlying aquifer it makes perfect sense that pumping from 104 new wells in one location could exceed its recharge capacity.”

Depending on the characteristics of the contract, I’m sure the landowner made money off the 104 wells he let them drill


32 posted on 08/29/2013 5:40:05 PM PDT by Figment
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To: Lorianne

Ludditism at it most obvious. Without fossil fuels, our national elites would still be farming and our commerce would move by sail. Paradoxically, only the exploitation of oil and gas will enable mankind to learn how to develop other forms of energy, because first the capital must be obtained to do the necessary research.


33 posted on 08/29/2013 7:54:55 PM PDT by RobbyS
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To: LS

I was going to comment at the Yahoo source but they ditched comments with their new site. So many conservatives used to post there i guess the owners didn’t like it.


34 posted on 08/29/2013 8:48:17 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: tcrlaf

Oh, what a creative remedy. The only stream of consequence anyplace near, that carries a significant volume of water even in the summer, is at the bottom of a canyon about 2000 ft. lower in elevation than my city, and the water it carries is pretty well allocated to other competing purposes, including anadromous fisheries, irrigation, barge shipping, etc. Fortunately for me and many others in this region, we don’t have to compete with oil extraction.


35 posted on 08/29/2013 9:29:45 PM PDT by Elsiejay
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To: tcrlaf

Oh, I forgot. This stream also contributes mightily to regional electric power supplies.


36 posted on 08/29/2013 9:32:29 PM PDT by Elsiejay
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To: Lorianne

First of it’s not a little town in Barnhart Texas, it’s a little town in Texas called Barnhart. Rough arid land with no water, thats why most of the ranchers run hair goats. If that ranchers running 500 head of cattle he’s going to need about 50 square miles of ranch and he’s still going to need a bunch of rain. I’m about a hundred miles nth of Barnhart, I’ve got some big ponds and a few water wells and nice green pastures for now. I can still only run 15 to 16 head per section.
If they drilled 100+ water wells on his place not only was he payed a per well price plus damages he’s also paid for the water that comes out of them. As we see in the article selling water for fracking is profitable and I’m sure he was paid hansomly for it and I’m will to bet he was given access to the water which is pretty much SOP.
If he did sell off his cows it was for the same reason we did over the last 2 years, there just wasn’t anything for them to eat due to the drought and you’ll go broke trying to feed them. I call bull shit on the whole article!


37 posted on 08/30/2013 3:28:23 AM PDT by Dusty Road
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To: dila813

no mention of the substitution of butane in place of water.


The reason for using butane is not to lower the amount of water usage which it does, it’s to be able to blow down into the sale line and recover some of the cost. We do CO2 fracs and it may take a week or more to blow all the CO2 out of the well before we can send gas down the sale line. With CO2 you vent back to the atmosphere and all money is lost, with butane you can sale it back to the gas company.


38 posted on 08/30/2013 3:47:41 AM PDT by Dusty Road
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To: LS

Sorry, there is already a revolutionary new fracking technology that uses CO2 and a tiny fraction of water to do the same thing that once required lots of water. Try again, libs.


Thats old technology that we’ve been doing for years.


39 posted on 08/30/2013 3:50:40 AM PDT by Dusty Road
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To: Lorianne

My well is not producing right now due to the fracking sun and not enough fracking rain.


40 posted on 08/30/2013 3:54:55 AM PDT by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: Rodamala

They use brine for fracking... higher S.G.


Thats true but not very common, few fracing companies have the equipment needed for salt water frac. It’s highly corrosive and will destroy standard steel pumps and lines. This is actually the way to go since every well produces some salt water naturaly and has to be hauled off on a regulat basis and disposed of. If the equipment is there it can be saved and used for fracing. The only problem with saltwater besides it’s corrosive properties is it’s weight which has a tendency to hold back the flow in the formation.


41 posted on 08/30/2013 4:00:12 AM PDT by Dusty Road
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To: Dusty Road
Thanks for the insight. My experience is more in the material transportation... sand and acid in, crude oil out.

Seeing what has been going on in the Permian Basin over the last 2 years is nothing short of uneffingbelievable. This nation has amazing... I mean, AMAZING natural resources, and I find it particularly disturbing that the obstructionist liberals in this country insist upon roadblocks to prosperity... and our energy security.

The hypocrites are driving their daughters to dance class in SUVs, air conditioning and heating their underwater McMansions, and you ever notice that the same people driving 20 miles to go to Zumba Class are the same people that pay Mexicans to cut their grass?

I swear, the solution here is to cut off all entitlements starting TODAY, like right now.

Every kid starting today, ought not be entitled to a college education, and future student loan forgiveness on the taxpayer dime (eriously, that is the next bubble). Rather, they ought to get a job in the oilfield, picking fruit, mowing grass, swinging a spiking maul building railroad track... BEING PRODUCERS and not CONSUMERS.

</rant>

OK... now I best get my fat ass back to work.

42 posted on 08/30/2013 6:23:57 AM PDT by Rodamala
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To: SteelTrap
in TX all water belongs to TX so there are no such things as water rights.

Water rights are a very important part of citizens of Texas, especially in the dryer parts.

43 posted on 08/30/2013 12:44:05 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Dusty Road

http://www.midwestenergynews.com/2012/05/15/waterless-fracking-technique-makes-its-debut-in-ohio/


44 posted on 08/30/2013 2:49:27 PM PDT by dila813
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