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DEBUNKED: 10 Airplane Myths That People Still Believe
Business Insider ^ | 09/24/13 | Alex Davies

Posted on 09/26/2013 12:03:19 PM PDT by oxcart

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To: BatGuano
But I don't lack the knowledge. I am saying that people who believe the myth DO need it, and that if one is trying to get them to understand something, one should take the exact same care.

Obviously, I am near alone in that opinion.

So.... why does the myth persist?

201 posted on 09/27/2013 10:32:09 AM PDT by Izzy Dunne (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help me spread by copying me into YOUR tag line.)
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To: Izzy Dunne
Clearly you have never watched "FR MythBusters" It's awesome. They don't bother to explain anything at all about why a myth is wrong, or how things really work. They just present a myth, then instantly flash up "DEBUNKED" They can go thru like 300 myths a show!
202 posted on 09/27/2013 11:35:40 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: Political Junkie Too

Given your frame of reference, I understand where you are coming from with your question. But I can unequivocally tell you that there are much greater factors affecting fuel consumption other than cabin temperature setting. By far, an aircraft’s change in altitude is going to affect fuel flow because of the variance in air density and therefore the fuel/air ratio.

I have a three hour flight tomorrow from Texas to the eastern Caribbean. I’ll put your theory to the test with extreme but brief changes in the selected cabin temperature. Hey, I can’t tick off the boss’s family sitting in the back now, can I?


203 posted on 09/27/2013 4:23:41 PM PDT by CFIIIMEIATP737
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

Thanks oxcart. Another myth is, when catastrophic failure happens in airliners, there must be foul play involved. Hell, there's a whole cottage industry from that one.
During the climb, the crew made preparations to detour around thunderstorms along the aircraft's track; anticipating turbulence, the captain kept the seatbelt sign lit. After the plane had been flying for approximately 16 minutes, and was passing between 22,000 and 23,000 feet (6,700–7,000 m), a grinding noise was suddenly heard in the business-class section, followed by a loud thud which rattled the whole aircraft. One and a half seconds later, the forward cargo door blew out abruptly. The door swung out with such force that it was forced past its normal stop and slammed the side of the fuselage, busting it open. Pressure differentials and aerodynamic forces caved in the cabin floor, causing ten seats (G and H of rows 8 through 12), as well as an individual seated in 9F whose armrest failed, to be ejected from the cabin. All 9 passengers seated in these locations were killed (seats 8G and 12G were unoccupied).[1] A gaping hole was left in the aircraft and a flight attendant in the Business Class cabin was almost pulled out of the airplane and was seen by passengers and fellow crew members clinging to a seat leg; they were able to pull her to safety inside the cabin, although she was severely injured. Another flight attendant in the Business Class Cabin hung on to the steps leading to the upper deck, and was dangling from them when the decompression occurred... The accident was most likely caused by improper wiring and deficiencies in the door's design... As early as 1975, Boeing realized the aluminum locking sectors were of too thin a gauge to be effective and recommended the airlines add doublers to the locking sectors. In 1987 Pan Am Flight 125 outbound from London Heathrow Airport encountered pressurization problems at 20,000 feet (6,100 m), causing the crew to abort the flight and return to the airport. After the safe landing, the aircraft's cargo door was found to be ajar by about 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) along its ventral edge... The aircraft was successfully repaired, re-registered as N4724U in 1989, and returned to service with United Airlines in 1990. In 1997, the aircraft was registered with Air Dabia as C5-FBS[12] and abandoned in 2001 during overhaul maintenance at Plattsburgh International Airport.[13]

United Airlines Flight 811

204 posted on 09/27/2013 5:13:40 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: fwdude

Heh, y’think? :’) When a plane comes apart at a few hundred miles an hour, erstwhile passengers die from shock due to having all their clothing torn off instantly and depressurization. Now, if they happen to be expert divers and are over the ocean, that’s a different story, although the end result is the same.


205 posted on 09/27/2013 5:15:58 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Izzy Dunne

You’re wasting your time, you know...


206 posted on 09/28/2013 7:08:17 AM PDT by gogeo (I didn't leave the Republican Party, it left me.)
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To: COBOL2Java

Those Chicago squads aren’t there to help out, but to boot the tires.


207 posted on 09/28/2013 1:11:55 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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