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NSA stores all collectable browsing data for 365 days, new leak reveals
The Verge ^ | 9/30/13 | Russell Brandom

Posted on 10/01/2013 7:24:31 AM PDT by shego

A new leak published by The Guardian reveals more details about the NSA's Marina metadata program, including the program's ability to look back at a full year of metadata for millions of web users, regardless of whether the users are the target of an investigation. The metadata can include anything from browsing history to more detailed account activity in the case of web-based email, including contact lists and potentially even account passwords.

The Marina program had been mentioned in previous leaks, but the new revelations, pulled from an NSA training document, show how the data was centrally stored and managed. Much of the data is coming from previously reported programs, like PRISM's bulk FISA orders or GHCQ's undersea cable-tapping operations. Once collected, the data is put to build detailed graphs of a person's known associates and social activity, a process referred to in the document as "pattern-of-life development."


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Government; Technical
KEYWORDS: bigbrother; nsa; snooping; surveillance
If you're on this site reading this message: Welcome to the Enemies Of The State list.
1 posted on 10/01/2013 7:24:31 AM PDT by shego
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To: shego

Don’t you feel safer? They are hell on wheels on their lovers/spouses though.


2 posted on 10/01/2013 7:28:30 AM PDT by txrefugee
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To: shego

An OCCUPIED country, but only the occupiers knew it...?


3 posted on 10/01/2013 7:33:31 AM PDT by gaijin
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To: shego
of course....more alinsky tactics than one can shake a stick at





This Message Not Approved by the NSA



4 posted on 10/01/2013 7:34:31 AM PDT by MeshugeMikey ( Un-Documented Journalist / Block Captain..Tyranny Response Team)
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To: shego

Will be interesting to see how the history books eventually deal with Mr. Snowden. If the Under 30 crowd has anything to say about it he’ll end up on a pedestal next to Thomas Paine and Patrick Henry.


5 posted on 10/01/2013 7:36:39 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Buckeye McFrog

Interesting how both of those luminaries sort of faded out of the history books (the former because of his controversial religious opinions, the latter because he distrusted the increased centralized power of the new Constitution).


6 posted on 10/01/2013 7:38:23 AM PDT by shego
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To: maggief; hoosiermama; TigersEye; penelopesire; ConservativeMan55; AllAmericanGirl44; Nachum; ...

Big brother is watching ping


7 posted on 10/01/2013 7:40:01 AM PDT by crosslink (Moderates should play in the middle of a busy street)
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To: shego

Well, I must be an interesting person to follow as I copy and paste people, places and things into my search bar after reading an article. If I do not know the person, I search to read about them. If I do not know an area, I search for a map of the place to look around. Just stuff like that.


8 posted on 10/01/2013 7:44:19 AM PDT by Bronzy
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To: Bronzy
I do random searches on weird stuff just to screw up their databases. As far as the database is concerned, I'm probably a transgendered dwarf of color in the market for 1962 Rolls Royce car parts.

/johnny

9 posted on 10/01/2013 7:49:36 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: shego

Can we get our computer data back from them if our hard drive goes down?
Kind of like Carbonite?


10 posted on 10/01/2013 7:51:22 AM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (Just wanted to say I hope you great NSA folks are enjoying my posts here.)
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To: HereInTheHeartland

11 posted on 10/01/2013 7:54:35 AM PDT by shego
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To: JRandomFreeper

LOL. A neighbor has a manikin for home security. Has it standing looking out a second floor window. When I searched the word “manikin” to find out where to buy one, I found mostly gay or adult sites. Never found cost or where to pick up one.


12 posted on 10/01/2013 7:55:34 AM PDT by Bronzy
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To: shego

You guys do realize that some of the data collected by the NSA is attorney/client protected in criminal and civil suits right?

You do understand that the data collected is being accessed by prosecutors involved in those criminal cases. Apparently, there is hard evidence of this.

I can’t wait to see how .gov handles THIS.


13 posted on 10/01/2013 7:55:39 AM PDT by BCR #226 (02/07 SOT www.extremefirepower.com...The BS stops when the hammer drops.)
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To: shego

Awesome!


14 posted on 10/01/2013 7:59:22 AM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (Just wanted to say I hope you great NSA folks are enjoying my posts here.)
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To: shego

Data is specific information. Such as “John Jones has a 1968 Chevelle”

Metadata is “we have 14,000,000 records containing information such as name, make and year of car”

Email header data is sender, receiver, time sent and received. This is what they call “metadata.” It is not. It is data.

Search terms are not metadata. Search terms are data.

In other words, they lied.

Anybody have better definitions and can add or subtract from this?


15 posted on 10/01/2013 8:10:44 AM PDT by I want the USA back (Media: completely irresponsible traitors. Complicit in the destruction of our country.)
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To: Bronzy

We used to move around an old manikin out at the weekend place. LOL, the screams when someone would find it in the doorway or in bed.

I have a ceramic turtle that I’d move a few times a year. The cat would totally freak out!!! Oh, no! It’s alive!!!! Hissssss! Snarl!


16 posted on 10/01/2013 8:12:13 AM PDT by bgill (This reply was mined before it was posted.)
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To: Bronzy
Well, I must be an interesting person to follow as I copy and paste people, places and things into my search bar after reading an article. If I do not know the person, I search to read about them. If I do not know an area, I search for a map of the place to look around. Just stuff like that.

This shows you to be an intellectually active and curious individual. That makes you dangerous to the NEW LEFTIST COLLECTIVE. Expect communications soon directing you to the nearest re-education center.

17 posted on 10/01/2013 8:14:20 AM PDT by Paine in the Neck (Is John's moustache long enough YET?)
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To: shego
As more and more of this reaches the lo-info voter that starts to give a damn, watch how quickly walls and fences are going to go up at our borders; it will be to keep us IN.

/no sarcasm, it'll happen.

18 posted on 10/01/2013 8:21:42 AM PDT by Ghost of SVR4 (So many are so hopelessly dependent on the government that they will fight to protect it.)
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To: shego

Suppose you do a lot of searches. A lot of research about many topics. You’re intellectually curious. You read a lot of news sites. You travel a lot. You teach 8th grade science, and buy a lot of fun things that you use in science class.

You will probably fit one of the profiles that these birdbrains are searching for.


19 posted on 10/01/2013 8:23:38 AM PDT by I want the USA back (Media: completely irresponsible traitors. Complicit in the destruction of our country.)
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To: I want the USA back
Suppose you do a lot of searches. A lot of research about many topics. You’re intellectually curious. You read a lot of news sites. You travel a lot. You teach 8th grade science, and buy a lot of fun things that you use in science class.
You will probably fit one of the profiles that these birdbrains are searching for.


20 posted on 10/01/2013 8:26:00 AM PDT by shego
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To: Bronzy
When I searched the word “manikin” to find out where to buy one, I found mostly gay or adult sites.

You could start by searching for the proper spelling: mannequin.

21 posted on 10/01/2013 9:06:42 AM PDT by justlurking (tagline removed, as demanded by Admin Moderator)
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To: I want the USA back
The classic sense of the word metadata was for files (or tables in the case of a database) which stored record and field definitions for other files.

Just an example, not complete, this is just a made up example...

field definitions of metadata file record layouts

FIELDS OF RECORD DEFINITION: FILE_DEFINITION
1) FILE_ID, 4 bytes, integer (primary key)
2) FILENAME, 80 bytes, char
3) FILETYPE, 1 byte, 'F' OR 'V' (fixed or variable length)
4) RECSIZE, 4 bytes, integer

FIELDS OF RECORD DEFINITION: FIELD_DEFINITION
1) FILE_ID, 4 bytes, integer (primary key)
2) FIELD_ID, 2 bytes, integer (primary key)
3) FIELD_NAME, 40 bytes, char
4) FIELD_TYPE, 2 bytes, integer
5) FIELD_SIZE, 4 bytes, integer

Using our example metadata, a program could read 1 record from FILE_DEFINITION and have the filename, enabling it in our oversimplified example to open the "data" file.

Then the program could read records of the data file.

Our program could read the data file's field records from the FIELD_DEFINITION "metadata" file.

After that, it would know how to interpret the records in the "data" file. It could dynamically know what the data file fields were from the "metadata" file - so it would not need that information hard coded in it's program logic.

This was called "data-driven" programming back in the day. The other way would be to have no metadata files. In that case, field types, sizes, record sizes, etc., would all have to be hard coded in the program.

Say our program, for example, was to read our 2 data files and print out the contents.

Say we add new fields to the data files.

Our hard coded program would need to have changes made to it (modify the source code) and then be recompiled. Then this new executable program would have to be sent to users. The old version of the program would not work with new file layouts. If we were real smart, we'd code our programs to detect the file version and support old file versions as well as the current one. But still, hard coding requires code changes and recompiling when file layouts change - because when we make our changes

On the other hand, if we used metadata files to "describe" our data files... our example of reading and printing out data file contents would never need recompiling of our program.

Our program would simply read the metadata files into memory (this would be hard coded) (this used to be called a "dictionary" or "metadata" or "control data", "file layout", etc.. Our program would then open, read and print the data files according to the record and field definitions given in the metadata.

If the data files have new data added to them, or changes made, only the metadata files need to be changed. No executable program (software) would have to be distributed to users, just updates to the metadata files.

Of course, metadata files could easily be more sophisticated than this example, including such things as a "version" number for files.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metadata has an overview of a lot of the yacking that has gone on in the ever-buzzwordy tech community about this.

In old terminology, we have the terms "header level" and "detail level" data. These are fundamentals that really never change though new buzzwords come into fashion. Information about a call would be, at the highest level for 1 single call, i.e., the header level. Within that, we have the call recording itself, a sound file, which would be at a detail level. If it's not saved or written to a permanent file, but just transmitted, it's a "stream" of data, but its simply call content data nonetheless; it's the detail data which makes up the actual phone call. If you pressed the 3 button on the phone during the call multiple times, you'd have that tone's data appearing multiple times in the call content data. Stored once for the entire call, however, at the highest "header level", is the information about the call, i.e., the caller's phone number, the call recipient's phone number, the final length of the call, etc. Such information is stored only once for the call; storing these phone numbers on every block of the call sound content data or some such scheme would obviously be quite redundant.

From the point of view of a simplistic view of the definition of metadata as "data about data", yes, the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_detail_record could be referred to as "data about data".

However the CDR, of course, does not describe the format of the phone call sound data, it contains header-level or summary-level call data and statistics.

If the format of the call sound data (a "sound file", etc.) was to be changed... then the decoding logic at both ends of the call would have to be changed. Ergo, executable programs would need source code modifications, then be recompiled and distributed throughout the phone system. Unless, of course, those programs used actual metadata.

But the supposed "metadata" of the call "header", i.e., call length, phone numbers, etc., would be of no help in dealing with changes to the formats used to transmit the sounds of a call, since it has nothing to do with those formats. It's simply data used to represent information at the "whole call", or "summary" level.

When the above article talks about "Metadata Types", it gets into a lot of the ivory-tower jargon that ignores the simple concept of whether or not program code has to be changed or not, which was the whole POINT of referring to metadata as metadata and not simply calling it data.
22 posted on 10/01/2013 9:50:39 AM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
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To: Bronzy

lol - yeah, careful what you search for!


23 posted on 10/01/2013 10:02:16 AM PDT by fuzzylogic (welfare state = sharing consequences of poor moral choices among everybody)
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To: justlurking

That might help. I’ve lost interest in finding one now. That was years ago.


24 posted on 10/01/2013 12:22:20 PM PDT by Bronzy
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To: Bronzy
When I searched the word “manikin” to find out where to buy one, I found mostly gay or adult sites. Never found cost or where to pick up one.

Try "mannequin". We get our store mannequins from New Tech Display.

25 posted on 10/01/2013 12:34:24 PM PDT by Mr. Jeeves (CTRL-GALT-DELETE)
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To: Mr. Jeeves
Thanks.
The manikin is a medical form used for education. So I found out today. I thought one manikin was all mannequins.

I saved the site for “security shopping”, yippee.

26 posted on 10/01/2013 1:10:34 PM PDT by Bronzy
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