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YouTube:All Saturn V Rockets Launched At The Same Time (Not Nearly As Dramatic As You Might Hope)
You Tube ^ | July 17, 2013 | SpaceOperatorFR

Posted on 10/09/2013 1:24:51 PM PDT by lbryce

YouTube:All Saturn V Rockets Launched At The Same Time (Not Nearly As Dramatic As You Might Hope)

YouTube:All Saturn V Rockets Launched At The Same Time

The Saturn V, magnificent bird, a thing of overpowering beauty and majesty, considered to be Man's greatest technological achievement (a title, I believe, of which would arguably have to be shared with the atom bomb) is a awesome sight to behold, merely viewed on the launchpad, the likes of which shall never come again.

This guy, certainly the most intense type of Saturn V sycophant there is took the time and effort to create a video of every Saturn V launch set side-by-side, taking off in synchronized lift-off, which I've said twice before doesn't manage to be as climactic as it sounds.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: saturnv

1 posted on 10/09/2013 1:24:51 PM PDT by lbryce
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To: lbryce

I remember that America.


2 posted on 10/09/2013 1:38:09 PM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: lbryce
Wow. That was the America run by 'old white guys' where fear of the protected class and political correctness didn't trump the actual work being done in the workplace. We've come so far since that time, huh? /s
3 posted on 10/09/2013 1:40:52 PM PDT by Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America (If Americans were as concerned for their country as Egyptians are, Obama would be ousted!)
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To: Last Dakotan

Sky Lab eh? I’ll have to remember that for a Trivia Contest.


4 posted on 10/09/2013 1:43:56 PM PDT by massgopguy (I owe everything to George Bailey)
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To: lbryce
Dramatic? This is "Dramawesomeness"!

Saturn V Launch ultraSlow Motion
5 posted on 10/09/2013 1:45:05 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

6 posted on 10/09/2013 1:50:51 PM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: lbryce

Apollo 6 looks a little nervous in the pre-launch phase.


7 posted on 10/09/2013 2:02:50 PM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: (optional, printed after your name on post))
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To: lbryce

The Soviet counter, N-1, was in fact more powerful, but was too complicated for the Soviets to make work...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ux4TrOEhh0c

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N1_(rocket)


8 posted on 10/09/2013 2:06:42 PM PDT by Wildbill22 (They have us surrounded again, the poor bastards- Gen Creighton Williams Abrams)
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To: Wildbill22

That N-1 Was a rocket over-engineered with 30, THIRTY, main engines. No flight lasted more than a minute or so.


9 posted on 10/09/2013 2:34:29 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: lbryce
I lived in Orlando area (near university of Central Florida) during the mid 1980s while working for Martin Marietta. During that time, there were a handful of shuttle launches before the Challenger incident. (By the way, I worked with a non-destructive test engineer who was on the investigation teams for Challenger, a recent Atlas failure, and another vehicle failure i can't remember)

During the launch of a shuttle, if the air was blowing right and you listened carefully, you could hear the shuttle rockets from the east side of Orlando - maybe 40 miles away from the launch site.

I mentioned this to a friend at work who grew up in Orlando, and like me, was a kid during the 1960s. He chuckled at my comment, and said during the Saturn V launches, you could stand anywhere in the Orlando area, and thought there was an earthquake.
10 posted on 10/09/2013 2:43:44 PM PDT by tang-soo (Prophecy of the Seventy Weeks - Read Daniel Chapter 9)
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To: tang-soo

It’s true about the Apollo launches - those F-1 engines were a sight to behold. I grew up in eastern New Orleans during this period, some 40 miles from the engine test facility in Stennis, Mississippi. Even the smaller second-stage Rocketdyne motors would rattle my mother’s china cabinet from that distance.


11 posted on 10/09/2013 2:52:47 PM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: Wildbill22
The point of identifying the N-1 as being more powerful is absolutely moot. It was a mammoth failure. Hundreds of not thousands were killed, burned alive in N-1 rocket lift-off mishaps. No flight lasted more than a minute. It may have been designed to be more powerful but it can never be said it was a more powerful rocket.

In a way, the huge failure that was the N-1 is emblematic of the way the Soviet Union itself imploded into non-existence.

12 posted on 10/09/2013 3:15:01 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: Last Dakotan

Sigh. :-( Very well said.


13 posted on 10/09/2013 3:19:57 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: lbryce

It was definitely a victory over the Soviet space program, but it is still noteworthy.
Like so many things Russian/Soviet, they tried to do things bigger and better, driven by a historic fear of being backward and behind the world. And not all Soviet rockets were failures. Some were/are noteworthy for their reliability.

The Russians/Sovs tried. They failed partly because we got the better Germans.


14 posted on 10/09/2013 3:34:22 PM PDT by Wildbill22 (They have us surrounded again, the poor bastards- Gen Creighton Williams Abrams)
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To: massgopguy
I've been in the Intertank area of that launch vehicle between the first and second stages and up in the Instrument Unit area which is between the Sky Lab and the shroud that would have covered the LEM in an Apollo launch.

As far as trivia goes, what was the 'milk stool' associated with the Sky Lab mission?

15 posted on 10/09/2013 3:34:44 PM PDT by tbpiper
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To: lbryce

I don’t think that was Apollo 12, as so labeled. It looked like maybe the Apollo-Soyuz launch, with the first stage missing.


16 posted on 10/09/2013 3:34:51 PM PDT by dr_lew
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To: tbpiper

Ha! I remember the milk stool! it was a set of scaffolding to bring the top of the rocket up to the level of the gantry, because the rocket didn’t require one of the stages.


17 posted on 10/09/2013 3:40:13 PM PDT by So Cal Rocket (Task 1: Accomplished, Task 2: Hold them Accountable!)
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To: So Cal Rocket

I had a co-op job with NASA at the time. One of my co-workers was somewhere inside the crew launch vehicle when it went through a series of rather violent tremors. Needless to say, he was concerned that the milk stool might be coming unglued, so to speak. This was before the first crew launch. Turns out that the astronauts were practicing with the launch escape system (the slide cable from the tower) which was vibrating the whole Structure. My guess is that the milk stool just happened to be a bit resonant at that frequency.


18 posted on 10/09/2013 3:56:34 PM PDT by tbpiper
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To: Wildbill22
The Russians/Sovs tried. They failed partly because we got the better Germans.

I was intrigued by your comments that implied we won the space race as a result of getting the better German rocket scientists (namely Werner Von Braun).

I tried to get information on German Rocket Scientists involvement, contribution to the Soviet Space Program, information provided at the Russian Space Web provided in the links but found nothing conclusive.

But in the end I had no choice but to concur with your statement simply because we did not have an American as head of our lunar rocket program, we had the premiere Germany rocket scientist of the day, while the Soviets had a Russian as head of their rocket program which would indicate, as you said, that we got the better German scientists.

German Legacy in Soviet Rocketry

Germans in Moscow Involved Rocket Programs

19 posted on 10/09/2013 6:11:17 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: So Cal Rocket; tbpiper

IIRC that was for the Saturn 1-B?


20 posted on 10/09/2013 6:42:00 PM PDT by SargeK
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To: SargeK

Yes


21 posted on 10/10/2013 3:52:41 AM PDT by tbpiper
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