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Launch of World's Largest Rocket- The Delta IV Heavy With NROL-65 On Board
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gL1dEBZ6Vyc ^ | August 26, 2013 | YouTube

Posted on 10/09/2013 2:30:36 PM PDT by lbryce

YouTube:Launch of World's Largest Rocket

Space Launch Report:Delta IV Data Sheet



TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: deltaiv; worldlargestrocket
Naturally, the first thing that comes to mind is how the feel and look of the Delta IV launch compares to that of the Saturn V.

The launch of The Delta IV is a thing of beauty, the three engines side-by-side give it a decidedly non Saturn V look, It seems to get off out of the gate quicker and with seemingly less effort than the vaunted Saturn V, its launch seems smoother and more polished than that of the Saturn V.

But the truth be told there's nothing to match the singularly unique circumstance of watching the the throttling brunt of power as the Saturn V takes to the heavens. The vaunted Saturn V has an overpowering presence, sense of majesty unparalleled, all its very own. Watching the engines come to life, the momentary pause in reaction to the huge engines coming to life, the near impalpable devices releasing their hold as if open-armed in setting the Saturn V free, as it slowly ever so slowly rises up off the ground, the Earth trembling, shock waves rolling across the ground hundreds of miles away, is pure, raw power unleashed, an experience that has, will probably never have anything in comparison to

1 posted on 10/09/2013 2:30:36 PM PDT by lbryce
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To: lbryce
Yes. I still remember watching the first Saturn V launch on TV in Jacksonville.

And then hearing it rumble outside, and rushing out in time to see, really see, it arc downrange on its way to space.

2 posted on 10/09/2013 2:40:01 PM PDT by null and void (I'm betting on an Obama Trifecta: A Nobel Peace Prize, an Impeachment, AND a War Crimes Trial...)
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To: lbryce
I liked the way the S5 lifted off. It seemed so slow, yet powerful, it looked like it might tip over, LOL. And the sound!! MAN, that thing was loud.

In his book White House Years Henry Kissinger wrote of a visit to Cape Canaveral and an up-close look at the S5. He said he was generally unimpressed with such scientific "gadgets", but once he was right next to it, he couldn't help but be impressed and in awe of the technology he saw there, not to mention the sheer size of it!

3 posted on 10/09/2013 2:45:19 PM PDT by jeffc (The U.S. media are our enemy)
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To: lbryce

Top secret payload to spy on Americans, yippeeee.


4 posted on 10/09/2013 2:46:47 PM PDT by BushCountry (Obama: The dentist told me I need a crown. I was like I KNOW, RIGHT?)
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To: lbryce

I was told once that the first Saturn V worked flawlessly, straight from the board.

If true, try that today...


5 posted on 10/09/2013 2:47:24 PM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com/2013/10/04/nicolae-hussein-obama/)
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To: lbryce
smooth launch. Obama was heard saying "you didn't build dat"
6 posted on 10/09/2013 2:48:24 PM PDT by Farnsworth ("The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness...This and no)
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To: jeffc

I doubt if they would make a kerosene-based rocket again. Werner went with this because it was known technology and certain to work, but others thought it was a bit too conservative.

(The first stage of the Saturn V was LOX/kerosene)


7 posted on 10/09/2013 2:55:12 PM PDT by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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To: lbryce
Delta IV Heavy can put 50,000 pounds into LEO (Low Earth Orbit).

Saturn V could put 260,000 pounds into LEO.

That was (I don't need to point out) more than forty years ago.

8 posted on 10/09/2013 2:59:46 PM PDT by Steely Tom (If the Constitution can be a living document, I guess a corporation can be a person.)
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To: Hardraade

While there never was a launch failure in Saturn V history there was a very serious design flaw that caused huge oscillations within the rocket known as the pogo effect that NASA, von Braun had to contend with that plagued the Saturn V, finally resolved.


9 posted on 10/09/2013 3:02:09 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: lbryce

Manned rockets are supposed to be slower on lift-off.


10 posted on 10/09/2013 3:05:20 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (It's hard to accept the truth when the lies were exactly what you wanted to hear.)
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To: Steely Tom
Thanks for the information. Before posting this I had tried to determine the thrust of the Delta IV in making a comparison between the Delta IV and Saturn V. I was unable to find any information about Delta IV thrust in a manner that made comparison to Saturn V easily done. Whatever specifications of the Delta IV rocket capability that I found had it listed in data too esoteric for me to make use of.

Thanks again for your efforts.

11 posted on 10/09/2013 3:06:51 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: lbryce

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_oscillation


12 posted on 10/09/2013 3:10:32 PM PDT by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Southack

Thanks very much for the link.


13 posted on 10/09/2013 3:16:51 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: lbryce

I was a kid in Cocoa Beach Florida and watched the liftoff of Apollo 13. From our school you could still feel the launch of the Saturn V in your chest as it rose.

Witnessed another Apollo launch from St. Augustine Florida a year or two later. Couldn’t hear it from that distance, but in broad daylight you could plainly see the exhaust plume from those five F1 main engines burning LOX and kerosene.


14 posted on 10/09/2013 3:17:47 PM PDT by Yo-Yo
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To: The Antiyuppie

The Falcon 9 uses kerosene in the first stage. It is more efficient per volume (not mass) than liquid hydrogen, is less corrosive on seals and components, and easier to handle than LH. However, since LH is more efficient per mass, it is often used in upper stages once the rockets get moving.


15 posted on 10/09/2013 3:19:18 PM PDT by MikeD (We live in a world where babies are like velveteen rabbits that only become real if they are loved.)
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To: Yo-Yo

“I was a kid in Cocoa Beach Florida and watched the liftoff of Apollo 13. From our school you could still feel the launch of the Saturn V in your chest as it rose.”

Wow,that is so cool——lucky you.

.


16 posted on 10/09/2013 3:19:46 PM PDT by Mears (Liberalism is the art ot being easily offended.)
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To: Steely Tom
Saturn V could put 260,000 pounds into LEO.

7.7 MILLION pounds of thrust from five F-1 first-stage boosters.

A singular human achievement.

17 posted on 10/09/2013 3:19:59 PM PDT by IronJack (=)
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To: Hardraade
I was told once that the first Saturn V worked flawlessly, straight from the board.

If true, try that today...

IIRC, it took Grumman around six years to design, test and deliver the Apollo Lunar Excursion Module. From scratch. Imagine that, only twice the time it took the programmers to cook up the ACA website code.

18 posted on 10/09/2013 3:20:46 PM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: Southack

Without modern computers and programs to aid in the prediction of resonance, it’s quite amazing that they did this with what they had.

On a much smaller scale, I worked for a company in the 80’s that kept having broken circuit boards in shipment. This was a high-power piece of equipment with many heavy semiconductor packages. Our new hotshot packaging guy built a model of the unit on a computer, and he discovered that the board had the same resonant frequency as a semi truck on the road - he made an animation of this (which took all day to render). The fix was a $0.20 spacer and post, and the problem never happened again, period. Our marketing department would show this animation to prospective customers as an example on our abilities to solve problems.


19 posted on 10/09/2013 3:21:47 PM PDT by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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To: IronJack
7.7 MILLION pounds of thrust from five F-1 first-stage boosters. A singular human achievement.

Yes.

The second stage of the Saturn V had a thrust of one million pounds, from five Rocketdyne J-2 engines, which burned LOX and LH2.

20 posted on 10/09/2013 3:27:31 PM PDT by Steely Tom (If the Constitution can be a living document, I guess a corporation can be a person.)
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To: lbryce
It seems to get off out of the gate quicker and with seemingly less effort than the vaunted Saturn V, its launch seems smoother and more polished than that of the Saturn V.

For a bit of fun, find the opening sequence for the old Buck Rogers TV show. They had a shuttle launch sequence, but before any shuttles had been launched. So they animated it as a slow launch like the Saturn V. But when the thing finally flew, it leaped from the pad.

21 posted on 10/09/2013 3:38:54 PM PDT by Vroomfondel
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To: jeffc

Concur..esthetically, the Saturn is gorgeous, compared to the Delta Heavy...the latter seems reminiscent of the old Soviet approach..take a reliable booster, and just bundle about 5 of them together..


22 posted on 10/09/2013 3:41:49 PM PDT by ken5050 (Benghazi investigation update: "The plot thickens, like Hillary Clinton's ankles.." (longfellow")
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To: Yo-Yo

I saw the Apollo 17 launch at night at Coco Beach. The sound of the snapping exhaust sounded like a Mack truck which could be heard all the way up to separation. The crowd was in a celebration mood. That pride in America is something you do not experience anymore.


23 posted on 10/09/2013 4:14:44 PM PDT by jonrick46 (The opium of Communists: other people's money.)
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To: jonrick46

And that is a shame that we can’t feel that pride today. Nobody is supposed to be exceptional but the proletariat seem to just love exceptional athletes. Go figure.

The celebration mood was collective relief. Even if the buildup was propaganda it was good for us. It brought us together. We had common enemies, common goals and common purpose. Leaders figure out how to orchestrate that.

We may recover but you and I will probably not live to see it.


24 posted on 10/09/2013 4:20:15 PM PDT by Sequoyah101
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25 posted on 10/09/2013 4:22:20 PM PDT by musicman (Until I see the REAL Long Form Vault BC, he's just "PRES__ENT" Obama = Without "ID")
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To: The Antiyuppie

I doubt if they would make a kerosene-based rocket again. Werner went with this because it was known technology and certain to work, but others thought it was a bit too conservative.


If I recall (from the wonderful book Apollo by Charles Murray of Bell curve fame - the best readable technical book about the program) kerosene made sense because it is relatively dense (energy per unit volume) compared to hydrogen used for other stages. The structure to contain hydrogen would have had to be so large that it would impose its own weight penalty.


26 posted on 10/09/2013 4:28:07 PM PDT by Atlas Sneezed (Cruz Control 2016!)
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To: lbryce

While there never was a launch failure in Saturn V history there was a very serious design flaw that caused huge oscillations within the rocket known as the pogo effect that NASA, von Braun had to contend with that plagued the Saturn V, finally resolved.


In testing, they actually detonated bombs in the nozzle to generate a pulse to trigger the oscillations that occasionally troubled them. When they could bomb the engine and it kept running smoothly, they knew they beat the problem.


27 posted on 10/09/2013 4:29:43 PM PDT by Atlas Sneezed (Cruz Control 2016!)
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To: The Antiyuppie

A company we might have heard of? (Good story)


28 posted on 10/09/2013 4:31:39 PM PDT by Atlas Sneezed (Cruz Control 2016!)
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To: The Antiyuppie
...he discovered that the board had the same resonant frequency as a semi truck on the road...

Where the heck did he get the resonant frequency data?

29 posted on 10/09/2013 5:14:09 PM PDT by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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To: Vroomfondel
The same producers created Flash Gordon and to watch their car-like space vehicles take off and land in leisurely slow motion fashion is certainly an anachronistic approach to leaving the surly bonds of either Earth or Mongo is that laughable to say the least.

Forward to 6:16 for landing approach

YouTube:Flash Gordon Landing on Mongo

30 posted on 10/09/2013 5:14:15 PM PDT by lbryce (Obama:The Worst is Yet To Come)
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To: Talisker

“...he discovered that the board had the same resonant frequency as a semi truck on the road...

Where the heck did he get the resonant frequency data?”

The way I remember it, there are well-known frequencies or at least a range of frequencies and amplitudes that 40-foot trailers in a tractor-trailer combo produce at normal highway speeds. This data is PROBABLY in a book on packaging engineering. I know that there are actually test chambers that very large companies or consulting firms have or once had that could duplicate these conditions. Stuff like this MAY have been rendered obsolete to a degree by computer modeling and simulation.

His animated simulation actually showed the circuit board flapping back and forth - even a casual observer could see that a circuit board couldn’t bend that way for long, if at all. It was pretty amazing stuff in 1987.


31 posted on 10/09/2013 8:58:26 PM PDT by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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