Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

To: Olog-hai

Holder wouldn’t be going for a murder charge, but civil rights violations. It’s evil, but it’s not double jeopardy.


16 posted on 11/04/2013 6:45:09 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies ]


To: Jonty30

There’s as much evidence for that as for the charges Zimmerman was acquitted of.

You can bet that Holder won’t want Rachel Jeantel testifying for him . . .


19 posted on 11/04/2013 6:47:45 PM PST by Olog-hai
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies ]

To: Jonty30

> Holder wouldn’t be going for a murder charge, but civil rights violations. It’s evil, but it’s not double jeopardy.

Irregardless its still “payback” for the same crime just using subterfuge. It’s really not even for “payback”; its just being used a political tool to get the black voters to mount up and get in line to vote against anything resembling a white candidate or anything representing the old guard in order to put the socialist’s / progressives’ candidates in offices. Most of the Obama supporters aren’t bright enough to understand how they’re being used as tools on this particular case though.


30 posted on 11/04/2013 6:57:31 PM PST by jsanders2001
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies ]

To: Jonty30
Holder wouldn’t be going for a murder charge, but civil rights violations. It’s evil, but it’s not double jeopardy.

It's not only double jeopardy, it's the very definition of tyranny as experienced by the Founding Fathers.

King George and his thugs didn't have enough brass to lie bald-faced about what they were up to when they went after their American colonial enemies.

The criminal Holder can call his "charges" against Zimmerman what he likes, but the fact remains that in Police State America, you can find a felony charge to pin on a peasant all day, every day:

Three Felonies a Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent

The average professional in this country wakes up in the morning, goes to work, comes home, eats dinner, and then goes to sleep, unaware that he or she has likely committed several federal crimes that day. Why? The answer lies in the very nature of modern federal criminal laws, which have not only exploded in number, but, along with countless regulatory provisions, have also become impossibly broad and vague. In Three Felonies a Day, Harvey A. Silverglate reveals how the federal criminal justice system has become dangerously disconnected from common law traditions of due process and fair notice of the law's expectations, enabling prosecutors to pin arguable federal crimes on any one of us, for even the most seemingly innocuous behavior.The dangers spelled out in Three Felonies a Day do not apply solely to''white collar criminals,'' state and local politicians, and professionals. No social class or profession is safe from this troubling form of social control by the executive branch, and nothing less than the continued functioning and integrity of our constitutional democracy hang in the balance.

I, for one, am sick of the swaggering, snide posturing of The King's Men and their little jackboot police state.

63 posted on 11/04/2013 9:20:21 PM PST by kiryandil (turning Americans into felons, one obnoxious drunk at a time (Zero Tolerance!!!))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies ]

To: Jonty30

Could be even worse, could be grounds for any American who so much as politely critiques someone from a special interest group having their lives turned upside down, if they are lucky, on any kind of civil rights charge the feds can come up with. And charging ordinary Americans with whatever crime they can think of is one area where the feds, particularly nowadays, lead the way in innovation.


65 posted on 11/04/2013 9:46:56 PM PST by freedom462
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson