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Historian finds newspaper from 1864 in archives
Register-Star ^ | November 28, 2013

Posted on 11/30/2013 6:38:17 AM PST by NYer

Finding a treasured piece of history hidden in a file cabinet may be the dream of many, but it happened to Stuyvesant Town Historian Juanita Knott. She recently found what could be handwritten copies of an 1864 newspaper, “The Old Flag” which lists pages of Union soldier prisoners of war during the Civil War, including those from New York state.

“I’m not sure if they’re copies or hand-written,” Knott said, carefully turning the yellow, almost crumbling pages of “The Old Flag” newspaper that she had clipped to acid-free paper so as not to destroy this voice from the past.

“It’s much too fragile to scan or photocopy,” Knott added.

According to The Handwritten Newspapers Project, an annotated bibliography and historical research guide to handwritten newspapers from around the world, “The Old Flag” was published by Union soldier Captain William H. May of the 23rd Connecticut Volunteers. May was also said to be a newspaper man in civilian life.

The Handwritten Newspapers Project states that only one copy of each numbered issue was published. The newspaper was written to break up the monotony of prison life, which, according to the project, included fresh water, food, shelter and even local trading at Camp Ford, Texas from 1863 to 1864. Each issue was read aloud as it was passed to prisoners in various cabins.

Local news, poetry art, satire, chess problems, advertisements and tongue-in-cheek jokes cover the three-column, four-page newspapers originally written with pen and ink. Lists of prisoners of war, including their rank, regiment and where and when captured are given their own pages.

“I hope to find at least one soldier from Columbia County. I’ve really just started on this,” Knott said.

This local historian by day, history detective by night said she is trying to find out how the newspapers got into the file and whether they are originals or copies.

“Playing detective is fun. This really makes me curious. We have more questions than answers at this point,” Knott said. “It’s a very interesting project. It may be overwhelming, too. The more people interested in it, the more answers we might find.”

A humorous excerpt from “The Old Flag” March 13, 1864 Issue No. 3 in the Stuyvesant archive states, “The ruffians even went so far as to dig a trench which they declared should be our Editorial Grave but as the immortal Webster once said, ‘We ain’t dead yet!’”

According to the book, “Stories of Stuyvesant,” by former town historian Priscilla B. Frisbee and Knott, Stuyvesant had some historic moments during the Civil War.

In 1862, railway switchman Patrick “Granther” Sweeney saved a troop train from colliding with a northbound express train.

In 1865, assassinated President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train passed by the rail station in Stuyvesant according to a printed schedule.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; News/Current Events; US: Connecticut; US: New York
KEYWORDS: civilwar; connecticut; godsgravesglyphs; greatestpresident; history; newyork

1 posted on 11/30/2013 6:38:17 AM PST by NYer
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To: SunkenCiv; The Mayor; Liz; NYFreeper

Columbia County, NY
2 posted on 11/30/2013 6:39:20 AM PST by NYer ("The wise man is the one who can save his soul. - St. Nimatullah Al-Hardini)
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To: GreyFriar

You may find this interesting.


3 posted on 11/30/2013 6:44:02 AM PST by NYer ("The wise man is the one who can save his soul. - St. Nimatullah Al-Hardini)
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To: NYer

http://www.censusdiggins.com/prisoners_camp_ford.html


4 posted on 11/30/2013 6:44:44 AM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: NYer
carefully turning the yellow, almost crumbling pages of “The Old Flag” newspaper that she had clipped to acid-free paper so as not to destroy this voice from the past.
“It’s much too fragile to scan or photocopy,”

Too fragile for light to pass over it, but not too fragile to clip to other pieces of paper? Really?

5 posted on 11/30/2013 6:45:12 AM PST by Teacher317 (Obama is failing faster than I can lower my expectations.)
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To: NYer

http://ohsweb.ohiohistory.org/exhibits/fftc/btlines/btlines_specs.aspx?section=pow&page=2


6 posted on 11/30/2013 6:49:04 AM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: Teacher317

I photograph old newspapers....Certain research facilities have that capability.


7 posted on 11/30/2013 6:50:15 AM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: Teacher317

That’s just selfish double speak for “we don’t want anyone to have a reasonable facsimile of this because we haven’t milked it for all it’s worth yet”.

Of course it could be photographed, etc.


8 posted on 11/30/2013 6:50:40 AM PST by Gaffer
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To: NYer

Wow!

That’s the county my Gr-Gr-Gr-Gr-Gr Grandfather was born in.
But he was born over 100 years earlier...

Wow.


9 posted on 11/30/2013 6:51:13 AM PST by djf (Global warming is turning out to be a bunch of hot air!!)
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To: NYer

Bayou Boeuf, LA, eh? Pretty far south for a bunch of New Yawkers. Wonder if they ran into Doc Milsap and his pretty wife Hannah.


10 posted on 11/30/2013 7:09:24 AM PST by Bedford Forrest (Roger, Contact, Judy, Out. Fox One. Splash one.<I>)
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To: NYer

Thank you very much. This is an excellent find. and a reminder of what may be hiding at the bottom of old antique drawers.


11 posted on 11/30/2013 7:23:32 AM PST by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: djf

Columbia County is both historical and scenically beautiful. Do you recall the town or village where he was born?


12 posted on 11/30/2013 7:25:49 AM PST by NYer ("The wise man is the one who can save his soul. - St. Nimatullah Al-Hardini)
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To: NYer

Lincoln’s Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, was convinced that at the end of the Civil War, there would be vast amounts of litigation, lasting decades or more. So he ordered that just about all military records of the period were to be archived. Incredible, voluminous amounts of them.

And he furthered ordered that any captured Confederate documents be added to the archive.

While he was mistaken about the litigation, this act proved to be a godsend of demographic information about the United States, greater in its impact even than the Domesday book of England, compiled just after the Norman Conquest.

Since that time, these records have yielded an astounding snapshot of America, including genealogical records, ethnographic and migration information, military service records, etc.

They were also very controversial. Even by the turn of the 20th Century, crude efforts were made to “correct” information that was regarded as not in line with the official history. For example, when blacks who worked for the Confederate military applied for retirement which was paid by the US government to retired Confederate soldiers, if they had an enlisted military rank, it was struck through by the paymasters, and replaced with a handwritten “servant”.


13 posted on 11/30/2013 8:26:31 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Last Obamacare Promise: "If You Like Your Eternal Soul, You Can Keep It.")
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To: NYer

Job Printing
Lowest Prices

in a hand written newspaper...

is that satire?


14 posted on 11/30/2013 8:28:34 AM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
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To: Bedford Forrest

Civil War POW’s?


15 posted on 11/30/2013 8:29:32 AM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
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To: NYer

I wonder how many prisoners decided to stay in Texas after release.


16 posted on 11/30/2013 8:39:43 AM PST by txhurl
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To: Teacher317

“It’s much too fragile to scan or photocopy,” Knott added.

Scan the photo.


17 posted on 11/30/2013 10:07:12 AM PST by Hostage (Be Breitbart!)
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To: Teacher317

“It’s much too fragile to scan or photocopy,” Knott added.

Scan the photo.


18 posted on 11/30/2013 10:07:12 AM PST by Hostage (Be Breitbart!)
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To: NYer; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ..
According to The Handwritten Newspapers Project, an annotated bibliography and historical research guide to handwritten newspapers from around the world, “The Old Flag” was published by Union soldier Captain William H. May of the 23rd Connecticut Volunteers. May was also said to be a newspaper man in civilian life. The Handwritten Newspapers Project states that only one copy of each numbered issue was published. The newspaper was written to break up the monotony of prison life, which, according to the project, included fresh water, food, shelter and even local trading at Camp Ford, Texas from 1863 to 1864. Each issue was read aloud as it was passed to prisoners in various cabins.
Thanks NYer.

19 posted on 11/30/2013 10:11:36 AM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: Teacher317
Fujitsu Launches ScanSnap SV600: digitize entire books and newspapers with ease. Only $600 at Amazon.
20 posted on 11/30/2013 10:34:15 AM PST by JohnBovenmyer (Obama been Liberal. Hope Change!)
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To: NYer

Interesting. Thanks for posting this.

“In 1865, assassinated President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train passed by the rail station in Stuyvesant according to a printed schedule.”

This was a relative’s first memory, seeing his funeral procession. And another, on my mother’s side, had her first job sewing the black (silk?) crepe for it.


21 posted on 11/30/2013 12:34:41 PM PST by OldNewYork (Biden '13. Impeach now.)
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To: NYer

A small area called Sharon Twnshp., east of the Hudson.

He, his wife, and a son or two are buried in a cemetery on private property east of Troy.

I grew up in the Finger Lakes area and went to school in Albany, so I’m quite familiar with those parts of the state.
NYC, not so much, and having been there a couple times, I don’t miss it at all!


22 posted on 11/30/2013 1:48:02 PM PST by djf (Global warming is turning out to be a bunch of hot air!!)
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To: GeronL

I believe the listed officers were all from NY units - several of them were taken at Bayou Boeuf, now part of Thibodeaux, LA. The reference to Doc Milsap and his pretty wife Hannah is purely whimsical and stems from Jerry Reed’s kick ass song ‘Amos Moses’. For a truly fine treatment of Confederate operations against the invaders in south Louisiana, see ‘Destruction and Reconstruction”, by LtGen Richard Taylor, CSA, [son of Zachary Taylor] who was personally involved in many of the actions


23 posted on 11/30/2013 4:06:48 PM PST by Bedford Forrest (Roger, Contact, Judy, Out. Fox One. Splash one.<I>)
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To: Bedford Forrest

Seems to have a very cool history behind it


24 posted on 11/30/2013 5:13:28 PM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy; rockrr; donmeaker
yefragetuwrabrumuy: "For example, when blacks who worked for the Confederate military applied for retirement which was paid by the US government to retired Confederate soldiers, if they had an enlisted military rank, it was struck through by the paymasters, and replaced with a handwritten 'servant'."

Ha! You guys never, ever quit, do you?
You just must, must rewrite every available history to suit your own Lost Cause purposes, don't you?

So let me ask, do you even know the real truth of this matter, or did you just make this up out of whole cloth?
Here is the truth of the matter:

Of course, pensions were paid by former Confederate state governments to their veterans, amongst whom were doubtless some black soldiers whose claimed military rank was changed by those Confederate state governments from whatever to "servant".

Indeed, since by all accounts there were far more black Union soldiers (178,000) than actual black Confederate soldiers (3,273 claimed to be veterans in 1890), one wonders if maybe a certain confusion had already set in as to who, exactly, was on which side?
We see that today in the numbers who can correctly name Lincoln's political party, or the party of slave-holders.

Of course, I understand how tempting it is to accuse others of your own sins -- Democrat politicos make their livings doing that -- but it only works if nobody knows what really happened.

And it's not pretty, so you need to stop it.

;-)

25 posted on 12/01/2013 4:40:26 AM PST by BroJoeK (a little historical perspective....)
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To: NYer

There’s an app for that.

I use an iPhone app that scans via photo, turns the scan into a regular .pdf file. One of the most useful apps I’ve ever used—I scan in bills and payments sent so I always have a copy at hand if needed.

I also ‘scan’ my large format negatives (4x5 and 5x7 inch) using my DSLR and a light box. Cheaper and good enough quality for web postings. A quality scanner that can handle large format is $700-1000.


26 posted on 12/01/2013 10:06:57 AM PST by Betis70
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