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To: GoodDay
Doctors, in general, are far smarter, in general, than are lawyers.

Some of them are young, more naive and inexperienced and in debt…they can't pick up and move as easily as those with grey hair, lots of experience in dealing with the licensing boards and regulators. Many doctors have already gotten their locum tenens licenses, have multiple state licenses. There will be states alert to the idiocy of Vermont and will be ready to receive fleeing physicians.

So, though you smirk more in sorrow rather than in anger, doctors are far better prepared for this than are patients. And those waxing smug after a lifetime of envying and resenting doctors.

Guild, my foot. It takes a multimillion dollar infrastructure to educate any kind of health pro…doc, dentist or nurse.

The "woe is me, the guild kept me out of medical school" ought to have studied harder for their organic chem exams.

6 posted on 12/05/2013 9:54:12 PM PST by Mamzelle
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To: Mamzelle

>>>Doctors, in general, are far smarter, in general, than are lawyers.

Yes, I hear that often . . . but only from doctors. I never hear it from lawyers. I’ve also seen no data to support that statement from neutral third parties (like psychologists) who could test the two groups and compare the results. Personally, I’ve met plenty of very stupid doctors.

>>>Some of them are young, more naive and inexperienced and in debt…they can’t pick up and move as easily as those with grey hair, lots of experience in dealing with the licensing boards and regulators.

Sorry, I don’t understand the relation between not having grey hair and not being able to relocate easily. School debt will follow them irrespective of where live. There’s no way out of school debt — no bankruptcy procedure — except to pay it back or literally leave the country. There is no licensure requirement or state investigation or federal investigation of someone’s debt status if he moves from Vermont to Texas. He simply moves and lets “Aspire” or some other debt-consolidation agency know where he is. It takes precisely ZERO time.

>>>So, though you smirk more in sorrow rather than in anger, doctors are far better prepared for this than are patients. And those waxing smug after a lifetime of envying and resenting doctors.

The reason I wax smug is not because I envy doctors, nor because I resent them. For many decades there has been a hand-in-glove relationship between the medical profession and government (both state and federal). The late Thomas Szasz, MD (author of “The Myth of Mental Illness” which promptly got him blacklisted from the A.P.A.) wrote that the state legitimizes doctors via licensing (i.e., “You, with your specific kind of allopathic training, are legit; you are a ‘real’ doctor. Everyone else without that kind of training is either NOT a ‘real’ doctor or simply a quack), and in return, the medical profession reports to state authorities who was born, who died, and who has various kinds of STDs (HIV, for example). Under Obamacare, the state (via the IRS) will know who drinks, who smokes, etc., etc.

I am smug because — sorry — this is what happens when you make a deal with the devil. Getting special favors from government in order to protect your market (er, uh, for the public’s own good, of course!) is always a devil’s bargain, and will inevitably bite you in the rear end. It’s now biting doctors in their collective gluteus maximi. I feel sorry for them . . . and, without question, I feel even more sorry for patients. Ultimately, it will be the consumers of medical care who will suffer the most.

>>>Guild, my foot. It takes a multimillion dollar infrastructure to educate any kind of health pro…doc, dentist or nurse.

Yes, I hear that often. But only from the providers of multimillion dollar infrastructures (”You need us! Can’t you see that?”). The historical facts are that the AMA fought to have states license only “approved” medical schools in order to squelch competition from two groups of care providers that were extremely popular with Americans in the mid-19th century: homeopaths and eclectics. Instead of competing freely with them in a spirit of “May the best kind of care win,” they sought to eliminate competition by means of state force. That’s the history, and those are the facts. See this PDF:

http://mises.org/journals/jls/3_1/3_1_5.pdf
“The Early Development of State Licensing Laws in the United States, 1875-1900”

Also watch Milton Friedman’s talk to doctors at the Mayo Clinic in 1978 on the trend toward greater government regulation and socialized medicine in the US:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJgbc8ojYUg&list=PL5E904E0D6DCAAA62
(in 6 parts)

Friedman picks up where the PDF linked above leaves off, as he mentions the famous report by Abraham Flexner in 1910, the upshot of which was to close down many medical schools in the US, thus limiting how many bright students — all whom might have done very well on their organic chem exams — could become doctors.

See this link for a brief description of the Flexner Report:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flexner_Report


8 posted on 12/06/2013 1:59:34 AM PST by GoodDay
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