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Climate change affecting Rio Grande water supply (clueless gov. bureaucrats, media lapdog)
The Albuquerque Journal ^ | December 12, 2013 | John Fleck

Posted on 12/12/2013 4:17:43 PM PST by CedarDave

Rising Rio Grande Basin temperatures, already increasing faster than at any time in more than 10,000 years, are projected to sap the basin of one-third of its surface water supply by the end of the century, according to a new report by federal scientists.

“It is sobering,” said Assistant Secretary of the Interior Anne Castle, who was in Albuquerque on Wednesday morning for the release of the Upper Rio Grande Impact Assessment, done by a team of scientists from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the Army Corps of Engineers and Sandia National Laboratories.

The study projected average temperature increases of 4 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the 21st century, with decreasing snowpack, increased evaporation and shrinking river flows converging on federal, state and local water management institutions. “That has ripple effects throughout the system,” Castle told a group of area water managers and community members Wednesday.

The assessment is the latest and most detailed in a series of analyses that have all come to the same conclusion: that rising greenhouse gases, which are driving up temperatures and changing the region’s climate in other ways, are likely to cause substantial reductions in the region’s already skimpy water supplies.

(Excerpt) Read more at abqjournal.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; US: New Mexico
KEYWORDS: climatechange; environment; globalwarming; globalwarminghoax; riogrande
... projected average temperature increases of 4 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the 21st century ...
... conclusion: ... rising greenhouse gases, which are driving up temperatures and changing the region’s climate in other ways, are likely to cause substantial reductions in the region’s already skimpy water supplies.

All are drinking the AGW Kool-Aid. As government bureaucrats they depend on government funding so dissent from the company line on global warming/climate change is not allowed. And, of course, looking at actual facts might cause them to question their conclusions so better to dismiss these and remain ignorant. Calling them "scientists" is really a stretch.

1 posted on 12/12/2013 4:17:44 PM PST by CedarDave
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To: LegendHasIt; leapfrog0202; Santa Fe_Conservative; DesertDreamer; OneWingedShark; CougarGA7; ...

NM list PING!

I may not PING for all New Mexico articles. To see New Mexico articles by topic click here: New Mexico Topics

To see NM articles by keyword, click here: New Mexico Keywords

To see the NM Message Page, click here: New Mexico Messages

(The NM list is available on my FR homepage for anyone to use. Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from the list.)
(For ABQ Journal articles requiring a subscription, scroll down to the bottom of the page to view the article for free after answering a question or watching a short video commercial.)

2 posted on 12/12/2013 4:19:37 PM PST by CedarDave (Small town America - last stand for God, freedom, civility, and American values.)
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To: CedarDave
...by the end of the century,...

These people have become a self-parody.

3 posted on 12/12/2013 4:21:53 PM PST by facedown (Armed in the Heartland)
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To: CedarDave
Idiots.

Perpetuating a known myth.

4 posted on 12/12/2013 4:22:32 PM PST by elkfersupper
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To: CedarDave

If they don’t publish they perish. Its as simple as that! IOW say something. It doesn’t matter if it makes any sense.


5 posted on 12/12/2013 4:22:35 PM PST by Don Corleone ("Oil the gun..eat the cannoli. Take it to the Mattress.")
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To: CedarDave

I guess that they must have missed the memo from the IPCC and basically all of the official climate data sets... the earth has experienced no statistically significant warming in nearly twenty years.


6 posted on 12/12/2013 4:24:21 PM PST by fireman15 (Check your facts before making ignorant statements.)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

*PING*


7 posted on 12/12/2013 4:25:42 PM PST by CedarDave (Small town America - last stand for God, freedom, civility, and American values.)
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To: fireman15
I guess that they must have missed the memo from the IPCC and basically all of the official climate data sets... the earth has experienced no statistically significant warming in nearly twenty years.

Must have extrapolated data from Michael Mann's hockey stick graph.

8 posted on 12/12/2013 4:27:29 PM PST by CedarDave (Small town America - last stand for God, freedom, civility, and American values.)
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To: CedarDave
Meanwhile here in Southern Michigan the fishing shanties have started popping up on the lake about 2 weeks early.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic
9 posted on 12/12/2013 4:36:59 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: CedarDave

The Rio Grande has been drying up for decades, but not because of global warming. These idiots are just looking around for anything to try to make their point, however unrelated.


10 posted on 12/12/2013 4:37:25 PM PST by skeeter
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To: elkfersupper
Idiots. Perpetuating a known myth.

For everyone's information, John Fleck is the Journal's science writer who publishes without question articles about man-caused global warming.

Here's a link to an article from this past Monday questioning whether the computer models used to simulate the impact of rising greenhouse gases may actually be underestimating the effect of global warming on long duration doubt in the southwest.

Is the IPCC underestimating the risk of southwestern drought?

11 posted on 12/12/2013 4:38:44 PM PST by CedarDave (Small town America - last stand for God, freedom, civility, and American values.)
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To: CedarDave
... projected average temperature increases of 4 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the 21st century ...

Last spring the pundits were claiming severe drought here in California, because the rivers were down. Last spring it didn't get warm enough to melt the snow pack until much later.
12 posted on 12/12/2013 4:41:42 PM PST by Foolsgold (Those who are too smart to engage in politics are punished by being governed by those who are dumber)
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To: CedarDave
The study projected average temperature increases of 4 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the 21st century, with decreasing snowpack, increased evaporation and shrinking river flows converging on federal, state and local water management institutions.

What this says is that the study is based on assumptions of future events for which they have not basis is science to make.

Innumerable future events and natural processes will impact CO2 in the atmosphere and man’s contribution to CO2 in the atmosphere. They can not know what future events will or will not impact the Earth’s climate. Natural processes like volcano eruptions and plant growth stimulated by rising CO2 levels have a much greater impact on climate than do the activities of man.

These ‘scientists’ mental masturbation contributes absolutely nothing to science or the progress thereof.

13 posted on 12/12/2013 4:46:28 PM PST by Pontiac (The welfare state must fail because it is contrary to human nature and diminishes the human spirit.)
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To: CedarDave
Colorado had major flooding the the weather service missed. Global warming? The flood was quite high until they opened the flood gates at Lake Estes and sent another 10 feet of water down. That would be enough to flush El Passo.
14 posted on 12/12/2013 4:53:20 PM PST by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: mountainlion
That would be enough to flush El Passo.

If it doesn't freeze before it gets there.
15 posted on 12/12/2013 5:07:59 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: CedarDave

There are some unusual temperature fluctuations in both directions, but the north exists, too. Most fluctuations have been more toward cold and are likely to be that way, until sometime after the current extended solar minimum is passed. For now, we’re in the period of the usual solar max, so it’s likely to get much colder at times over the next 9 years or so, at least.


16 posted on 12/12/2013 5:10:13 PM PST by familyop (We Baby Boomers are croaking in an avalanche of corruption smelled around the planet.)
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To: familyop

Yup. Its January/February cold here now and that sucks.

We’re at about 10 degrees right now but we’re getting a moderating effect from the great lakes till they cool down.


17 posted on 12/12/2013 5:12:59 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: mountainlion
Colorado had major flooding the the weather service missed. Global warming? The flood was quite high until they opened the flood gates at Lake Estes and sent another 10 feet of water down. That would be enough to flush El Passo.

Ahh, but they cover their a$$es with this statement:

But while overall average water supplies will decline, the region is projected to experience an increasing range of wet and dry periods, with more severe droughts accompanied on occasion by more severe floods.

Of course, that is the history of the southwest - drought caused the Anasazi to move from Chaco Canyon about the time of Columbus and in the early 1940's, following depression era drought in the central US, large rainfall events filled Elephant Butte lake to overflowing.

Drought then heavy rainfall followed by drought is nothing new in the SW - only man's settlement in the southwest has changed the equation slightly (e.g. urban heat islands with thermometers located near heat sinks [i.e. black pavement], and first suppression of fires followed by logging bans causing mammoth forest fires which sterilize and cement the soil). These result in hotter days and nights in city areas and increased flooding when rain does fall. None of this is due to increases in CO2 or carbon in the atmosphere.

18 posted on 12/12/2013 5:17:37 PM PST by CedarDave (Small town America - last stand for God, freedom, civility, and American values.)
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To: cripplecreek
If it doesn't freeze before it gets there.

It almost got up to 50 today. Golden has some ice dam problems but the water won't get near El Passo the Missouri and Mississippi get the water.

19 posted on 12/12/2013 5:17:58 PM PST by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: skeeter

there a hearing going on as we speak between Texas and New Mexico, the claim is southern New Mexico is using too much water from the rio for irrigation.


20 posted on 12/12/2013 5:18:44 PM PST by Dusty Road
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To: CedarDave

The old maps said Great American Desert but they changed the name so they could sell the land.


21 posted on 12/12/2013 5:20:44 PM PST by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: skeeter

It’s all those Gila Monster lizards pissing in the Rio Grande that is raising the water temperature.

Must establish a “No Pissing Zone” ASAP.


22 posted on 12/12/2013 5:27:57 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: cripplecreek

To #9: I thought that was a scene from “2001” but in white.

Actually wish it was the final resting place of Obamacare.


23 posted on 12/12/2013 5:29:32 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: CedarDave

Later


24 posted on 12/12/2013 6:29:30 PM PST by wjcsux ("In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." - George Orwell)
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To: facedown

“By the end of the century” was their answer in the last century, though it didn’t come to pass.


25 posted on 12/12/2013 6:29:34 PM PST by tbw2
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To: tbw2

And the only thing that can stop it is RAISING YOUR TAXES


26 posted on 12/12/2013 6:33:32 PM PST by spawn44 (MOO)
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To: cripplecreek

And IF Lake Estes drained into the Rio Grande River.


27 posted on 12/12/2013 6:34:36 PM PST by csmusaret (Will remove Obama-Biden bumperstickers for $10)
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To: CedarDave

We are told by experts that in the American southwest, the Mesa Verde area was settled by 400 AD. The Anasazi inhabited Mesa Verde between 600 to 1300, and the settlements dried up and became uninhabited due to climate change that made agriculture unsustainable.

Was this the climate change in question?


28 posted on 12/12/2013 6:54:32 PM PST by theBuckwheat
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To: skeeter
The Rio Grande has been drying up for decades, but not because of global warming. These idiots are just looking around for anything to try to make their point, however unrelated.
I read a paper in the early 80's that discussed the Rio Grande and the declining water levels. They pointed out that there are countless millions of Tamarisk (Salt Cedar) trees the entire length of the Rio Grande on both sides. These trees were brought to the Southwest from the Middle East in the late 1800's and planted for wind blocks. They are very dense. There are some areas south of Albuquerque where they are so close together that you can't walk between them. They soak up water like a dry sponge. The estimate at that time is they absorbed about 1/3 of the Rio Grande water.
29 posted on 12/12/2013 8:01:40 PM PST by wjcsux ("In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." - George Orwell)
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To: CedarDave

projected average temperature increases of 4 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the 21st century ...
***************************************
These so-called government scientists can’t even predict the weather a year from now; yet they want to impose regulations based on their predictions for what the temperature will be 88 years from now!

Is there anyone working for this Obama Admin. who has a lick of common sense or knowledge of what the scientific method entails? (rhetorical)


30 posted on 12/12/2013 9:06:38 PM PST by octex
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To: Pontiac
What this says is that the study is based on assumptions of future events for which they have not basis is science to make.

And most significantly, also no fear of being around in 87 years to be called to account. The penalties for misrepresentation and fraud really need to be strengthened. How many of these "scientists" conspired to conceal meetings and to withhold activity subject to the FOIA laws?

31 posted on 12/12/2013 10:21:27 PM PST by publius911 ( At least Nixon had the good grace to resign!)
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To: CedarDave

There is evidence that New Mexico and surrounding areas experience a 300-year drought cycle, and that we may be headed into that cycle again. Tell me again, who was responsible for the greenhouse gasses 300 years ago?


32 posted on 12/13/2013 5:59:37 AM PST by IYAS9YAS (Has anyone seen my tagline? It was here yesterday. I seem to have misplaced it.)
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To: IYAS9YAS

The first time I saw the Rio Grande in El Paso was over 30 years ago. The great news minds reported, “Illegal immigrants were swimming the Great River in the North to escape from Mexico into the US.” Well, little children waded waist high in the mighty river.
It’s dry now. The Rio Grande curves north to Colo at Las Cruces, NM. There’s been no water in it for two or three years.


33 posted on 12/13/2013 1:55:24 PM PST by jayrunner
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To: jayrunner
The Rio Grande curves north to Colo at Las Cruces, NM. There’s been no water in it for two or three years.

In the Albuquerque metro area, it's flowing about how you describe Las Cruces from 30 years ago.

34 posted on 12/13/2013 6:23:02 PM PST by IYAS9YAS (Has anyone seen my tagline? It was here yesterday. I seem to have misplaced it.)
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