Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Big-bang-defying giant of astronomy passes away (article)
Creation.com ^ | 12-31-13 | John G. Hartnett

Posted on 01/02/2014 9:11:49 AM PST by fishtank

Big-bang-defying giant of astronomy passes away

by John G. Hartnett

Published: 31 December 2013 (GMT+10)

Halton Arp passed away on Saturday morning 28th December 2013 in Munich, Germany. He will be sorely missed by many but not so much by others because of his challenges to the ruling big bang paradigm.

With Geoffrey Burbidge and others, Professor Halton Arp was a thorn in the side of those who held to the standard story line of the big bang. In many papers and several books1 he promoted the idea that quasars are born from the nucleus of active galaxies—parent galaxies.

In the standard big bang model their very large redshifts are interpreted according to the Hubble Law to mean they are the most distant sources in the universe.

According to Arp’s alternative model, evidence strongly suggests that they are associated with relatively nearby active galaxies and that they have been ejected from those parent galaxies.

One extremely good example of this was reported in the Astrophysical Journal2 in 2004 where a quasar was found embedded in the galaxy NGC 7319 only 8 arc minutes from its centre. See figure 1. The arrow indicates the quasar.

This finding was presented by Margaret Burbidge at the January 2004 AAS meeting in Atlanta. The response, according to Halton Arp, was “overwhelming silence.” It was reported on the University of California, San Diego webpage (10 January 2005).3 The subtitle is “Can A ‘Distant’ Quasar Lie Within A Nearby Galaxy?”, extolling the riddle.

... more at link


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: astronomy; bigbang; catastrophism; creation; giant; haltonarp; obituaries; obituary; stringtheory; xplanets

Halton Arp (1927–2013)

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

1 posted on 01/02/2014 9:11:49 AM PST by fishtank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: fishtank

well now he knows


2 posted on 01/02/2014 9:16:34 AM PST by NonValueAdded (It's not the penalty, it's the lack of coverage on 1 Jan. Think about it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fishtank

Chip Arp will be missed. He was well liked by everyone ion the astronomical community.

Rest in Peace


3 posted on 01/02/2014 9:25:36 AM PST by buffaloguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Ping.


4 posted on 01/02/2014 9:32:13 AM PST by Squawk 8888 (I'd give up chocolate but I'm no quitter)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: buffaloguy

Einstein was right! For the big bang to have happened, all laws of physics and nature would have to be suspended for some time and then have to be reinstated. It happened some other way, but not the big bang.


5 posted on 01/02/2014 9:50:02 AM PST by maxwellsmart_agent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: maxwellsmart_agent

So far, the Big Bang seems to be holding up. There are problems with Arps’s theories which haven’t been resolved to anyone’s satisfaction.


6 posted on 01/02/2014 10:06:31 AM PST by buffaloguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: fishtank

In case anyone wants to know more about quasars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quasar


7 posted on 01/02/2014 10:09:59 AM PST by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fishtank
Arp's book is worth reading. It is accessible to the non-scientist. Even if he's wrong, he presents some strong arguments that must be answered by the proponents of a big bang.
8 posted on 01/02/2014 10:13:51 AM PST by JoeFromSidney
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: buffaloguy

Big Bang is a bunch of flagrant bullshit which should have been rejected on day one on purely philosophical grounds. Having all the mass of the universe collapsed to a point would be the mother of all black holes; nothing would ever “bang(TM)” its way out of that.


9 posted on 01/02/2014 11:59:00 AM PST by varmintman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Moonman62
The old works in a drawer tv set? Yeah I remember those.


10 posted on 01/02/2014 12:05:20 PM PST by xp38
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: xp38

Wow that’s a memory from my youth.


11 posted on 01/02/2014 12:06:56 PM PST by nascarnation (I'm hiring Jack Palladino to investigate Baraq's golf scores.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: varmintman
The Big Bang theory was around in the 1950’s until Einstein got ahold of it. He completely obliterated it. They went silent until after he died in 1956. Then the goofballs started climbing out from under the woodwork again. There is no science behind the theory.
12 posted on 01/02/2014 2:00:54 PM PST by maxwellsmart_agent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: fishtank
Was not aware that Halton Arp had passed.

RIP Mr. Arp.

I enjoy scientific anomalies and he found them, with proof.

13 posted on 01/02/2014 2:10:18 PM PST by The Cajun (Sarah Palin, Mark Levin, Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, Louie Gohmert......Nuff said.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: maxwellsmart_agent
Check out "Hidden in Plain Sight 2" by Dr. Andrew Thomas. 0.99 dollars on Kindle. Fairly radical, and highly thought provoking. Generally, that gravity aims to hold systems of objects (and massive objects) at their Schwartzchild radius. The "big bang" was no bang, no "inflationary" period. The expansion of the universe is speeding up as we see it, now, due to nature's impulse, enforced by gravity, that the size of the universe be its Schwarzchild radius.
14 posted on 01/02/2014 2:25:52 PM PST by Cboldt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: xp38

Here’s a quasar TV commercial, featuring some chick named Welch.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jlk9-NGMrDQ


15 posted on 01/02/2014 2:26:23 PM PST by fishtank (The denial of original sin is the root of liberalism.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: fishtank

Thanks for that :)


16 posted on 01/02/2014 4:37:39 PM PST by xp38
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Squawk 8888; 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; ...

Ouch! Thanks Squawk 8888. R.I.P. to a giant. Three-list ping, four with an extra to APoD.


17 posted on 01/02/2014 8:57:17 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: maxwellsmart_agent

When you got nothing else, just call it a big bang.... everything out of nothing.

There’s no possible way of explaining what everything was even one second before the ‘big bang’.


18 posted on 01/02/2014 9:45:04 PM PST by Bullish (America should yank Obama like a rotten tooth before he poisons the entire body)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: fishtank

Nice picture, oh, and the TV is nice too.


19 posted on 01/03/2014 4:27:23 PM PST by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: fishtank; NonValueAdded; buffaloguy; Squawk 8888; maxwellsmart_agent; Moonman62; JoeFromSidney; ...
I never believed the Big Bang theory, it just didn't feel right to me.

A black hole is a region of spacetime from which gravity prevents anything, including light, from escaping. The existence of black holes allows the compression of all matter into one huge singularity, which allows the Big Bang theory to be a possible truth.

However, the black hole model has been called into doubt by none other than Stephen Hawking, who now says that matter can escape from ‘black’ holes. If Black Holes aren't truly excape-proof, how is the formation of the exploding massive singularity possible?

20 posted on 01/28/2014 5:09:24 PM PST by exodus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: exodus
The big bang seems reasonable to me. I haven't kept up with the current models but the black holes have not been eliminated just yet.

For every astrophysicist there is a different model.n

21 posted on 01/28/2014 5:42:03 PM PST by buffaloguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: buffaloguy
It's not that I'm skeptical about the math. I just can't accept that there is a limit to the universe. It's like a fish bumping into a concrete dam, and saying, “Well, that's it. There's nothing beyond this point.”
22 posted on 01/28/2014 6:31:44 PM PST by exodus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: exodus
The universe came about somehow. Either it materialized in some spread out form, or it started small and got bigger. It appears to be getting bigger now, so the "started small and got bigger" theory seems to have a leg up.

Hawkings shift isn't all that dramatic. Hawking radiation is the escape of energy from a black hole, due to quantum effects. His modified stance is that the event horizon isn't a sharply delineated "surface," but somewhere, at a smaller radius, gravity rules. I would think that the same quantum effect can play at that smaller radius too, so energy has a way to work its way "outward" from the pull of gravity.

23 posted on 01/28/2014 6:57:03 PM PST by Cboldt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Cboldt
Thanks, Cboldt.

I guess that I'm having an Einstien moment, like when he said, “God does not play dice with the universe!” I do not like the limits the Big Bang imposes.

24 posted on 01/28/2014 8:05:00 PM PST by exodus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: exodus

I’ve never been able to fathom how time started moving forward. I mean, what was time even one second before a so called ‘big bang’? How could time even exist without a starting point, and what the heck was time before that point? I don’t believe that can ever be answered by any human being.

It boggles the mind.


25 posted on 01/28/2014 8:11:16 PM PST by Bullish (America should yank Obama like a rotten tooth before he poisons the entire body)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Bullish

My mind boggles too.

What time was it before time began? What did the Big Bang singularity expand into, if there isn’t anything beyond our universe? If things that fall into a black hole can’t come back into our universe when the black hole evaporates, where do they go?

If everything that ever existed, time, space, information, and all, is destroyed with every Big Bang cycle, there’s no point to either the universe or us existing at all.

I just can’t believe that.


26 posted on 01/28/2014 8:57:12 PM PST by exodus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: exodus
I rather like the new theory of ‘grey holes’ where light and other matter can slowly dissipate over time. It would mean light particles and other matter changing into other forms of matter, thereby allowing escape. That, IMO would fit in with string theory and could explain a lot of things that are unexplainable with the current ideas of matter, space and time.
27 posted on 01/28/2014 9:28:19 PM PST by Bullish (America should yank Obama like a rotten tooth before he poisons the entire body)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: fishtank
I was already aware of Arp's passing. I only recently, however, became aware of him and his theories. Here are some iconoclastic books that I think are worth reading.

Lerner, Eric J., The Big Bang Never Happened,Vintage Books, 1991. I'm a bit dubious about his argument, since he appears to propose that the universe is infinite in both time and space. I think he dismisses Olbers Paradox too quickly (the night sky is dark; if the universe were infinite in time and space we would expect the night sky to be as bright as day).

Weintraub, David A., How Old is the Universe, Princeton U. Press, 2011.

Arp, Holton, Seeing Red, Apeiron, 1998. Arp argues that the "red shift" has nothing to do with velocity and the Doppler effect, but instead is a function of the age of the source.

Ratcliffe, Hilton, The Static Universe, Apeiron, 2011. The author argues that the universe is not expanding at all, but the red shift is due to light losing energy as it travels great distances, thus increasing in wavelength.

Obviously these books are at variance with the "standard model" of cosmology, but each points to discrepancies that the "standard model" doesn't explain.

I'm not a cosmologist. The arguments in each of these books sound plausible, and some seem to be supported by evidence. However, it's outside my field, and I can only say it sounds interesting and worth reading about.

28 posted on 01/29/2014 4:35:16 PM PST by JoeFromSidney (itYe)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JoeFromSidney

**** “... he appears to propose that the universe is infinite in both time and space ...” ****

Like you, I’m not a cosmologist, but I believe that both are infinite. It just feels right.


29 posted on 02/03/2014 3:42:40 PM PST by exodus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Bullish
It's been a long time since I've looked at string theory.

As far as grey holes allowing matter to escape after that matter has changed into a different kind of matter, matter is still escaping from the hole. In my understanding that would preclude the formation of the Big Bang singularity, just as escape from a black hole would.

Plainly I don't understand the theories involved, but the subject is fascinating.

30 posted on 02/03/2014 4:50:38 PM PST by exodus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

Galianni, P., Burbidge, E.M., Arp, H.C., Junkkarinen, V., Burbidge, G. and Zibetti, S., “The Discovery
of a High Redshift X-Ray Emitting QSO Very Close to the Nucleus of NGC 7319”, ApJ, 620, 88-94,
February 10, 2005.


31 posted on 06/28/2014 1:41:26 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson