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There's A Huge Bullish Story On Energy And The Economy And It's Sitting Right Below The Radar
businessinsider ^ | 1/9/2014 | Rob Wile

Posted on 01/09/2014 10:46:29 PM PST by ckilmer

There's A Huge Bullish Story On Energy And The Economy And It's Sitting Right Below The Radar

Rob Wile Yesterday at 9:34 AM
Williston North DakjotaWilliston, North Dakota

Economists have recently been scrambling to crank up there U.S. GDP growth forecasts.

“What’s going on here?” asked Potomac Research Group’s Greg Valliere. “In a word, it’s energy.”

In a note today, Valliere called this a huge story that’s below most people’s radar.

As Bloomberg’s Bob Ivry said this morning about the Great American Shale Boom: “Nobody Expected U.S. Oil Boom to Be This Boomy.”

It’s basically true — there have been lots of doubters who’ve argued it was all just a flash in the pan.

But energy has been an amazing growth story in the U.S. for the past few years. And continues to be so today.

Now, economist Ed Yardeni believes a “fracking dividend,” much like the “peace dividend” that followed World War II, is about to take hold and lift the U.S. economy. He writes:

The Fracking Dividend has already narrowed this US petroleum trade deficit from a recent peak of $US359 billion (saar) during January 2012 to $US182 billion during November 2013. The deficit could go to zero over the next couple of years. That would provide a big dividend to real GDP growth, as well as more purchasing power for Americans. Building the infrastructure to export crude oil would be another benefit, especially for capital goods manufacturers.

On Wednesday, we learned oil had helped cut the U.S. trade deficit to a four-year low. Petroleum product exports climbed to an all-time high of $US13.3 billion. Meanwhile, crude imports declined to $US28.5 billion, the lowest since November 2010. The petroleum deficit thus shrank to $US15.2 billion in November, the lowest since May 2009.

This chart from Yardeni documents these phenomena. The units are in barrels, not dollars, and thus shows an even greater magnitude:

Fracking dividend

Those gains are all because domestic production continues to boom. Oil output is at 25-year highs:

Eia oil production

Natgas production is at all-time highs:

Eia natgas

And the EIA now projects the boom will remain mostly steady into 2020 for oil and well beyond for natural gas.

Eia poutlook

Oil and gas firms are now making a strong push to allow for raw crude exports, which have been banned since the ’70s oil crisis. Reuters saysthey’re not facing much opposition, andsome analyststhink it could help lower gas prices in the long term by releasing more supply onto the market, though it would likely raise prices in the short term.

Even if that were that to occur, they’d merely be rising back to levels we’ve seen before — not to new highs. That’s because gas prices have been drifting lower for the past few years, leading to an outcome we’ve called “plateau oil.”

Deutsche Bank’s Joe LaVorgna has said every $US0.01 change in gasoline prices is worth $US1 billion in the economy. Prices have declined more than $US0.50 since 2011 highs. Chart:

Gas prices jan 14

Most importantly, the boom has created jobs. Although the overall numbers remain modest, payrolls in the oil and gas sector have grown faster than most other parts of the economy. Here’s a chart from Bloomberg economics editor Vince Golle chronicling the trend:

Bloomberg oil gas jobs

We have to mention that there remain concerns about the environmental effects of fracking. Evidence continues to mount that activity associated with fracking has caused earthquakes in Oklahoma to spike, and an AP report showed the number of water quality complaints in areas with fracking activity has surged, although not all of these can be linked directly to fracking, which involves sending hundreds of thousands of gallons of water and chemicals into the ground to free up resources.

But we’ll give the last word to Potomac’s Valliere, who agrees with Yardeni’s sentiment that energy will tip the U.S. into overdrive. In a note this morning he writes:

With Washington staying out of the way (no crises, no major new fiscal headwinds), when was the last time we could say this: the risks on the economy are upside risks. This is a major reason why Fed tapering will continue — and it’s still another reason why the budget could get close to a surplus within two years.



TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: energy; fracking; gas; oil; shale

1 posted on 01/09/2014 10:46:30 PM PST by ckilmer
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To: thackney; SunkenCiv

ping


2 posted on 01/09/2014 10:47:03 PM PST by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

I followed Yardeni throughout the 2000 rollover problem. Guy sees a long way out.


3 posted on 01/09/2014 10:50:14 PM PST by txhurl
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To: ckilmer

Whaaaat?


4 posted on 01/09/2014 10:57:09 PM PST by Bullish (America should yank Obama like a rotten tooth before he poisons the entire body)
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To: ckilmer

The post-obama era could be very prosperous for America.


5 posted on 01/10/2014 12:01:12 AM PST by clearcarbon
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To: ckilmer

With all of this oil I’m still paying $3.50 a gallion for gasoline and $2.89 for propane. We’ve become comfortable with the price and I don’t believe it’ll go below the pre Obama years no matter how much of a glut we have. It’s price fixing.


6 posted on 01/10/2014 2:41:38 AM PST by lucky american (The Democrats will follow the big "D"even if it means going over a cliff.)
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To: ckilmer

Ironic that the nation’s independent oil men and oil companies have been the one bright spot in the Obama Depression. Thanks to them, there are some parts of the U.S. that are creating jobs for thousands.

Absolutely NO credit should be given to Obama and the rest of the enviro-nazis, who have done everything they could to stand in the way of this energy boom. They wasted billions of tax dollars funneling money to their cronies in green energy scams at the same time. If life were fair, they should have all frozen to death last week.


7 posted on 01/10/2014 3:06:16 AM PST by txrefugee
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To: ckilmer
Amazing.

But imagine how much worse our economy would be without this.

8 posted on 01/10/2014 3:22:19 AM PST by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: lucky american
It’s price fixing.

Puhleeeeeez. How would that work?

9 posted on 01/10/2014 3:23:34 AM PST by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: ckilmer
Economists have recently been scrambling to crank up there U.S. GDP growth forecasts.

Hmmm. Maybe they should "crank up" their spelling first.

10 posted on 01/10/2014 3:48:55 AM PST by Standing Wolf (No tyrant should ever be allowed to die of natural causes.)
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To: Standing Wolf

Their/there, loose/lose. I even see where/were. Pathetic.


11 posted on 01/10/2014 4:40:03 AM PST by petercooper ("I was for letting people keep their health insurance, before I wasn't". --- Barack Obama)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
It’s price fixing.

Puhleeeeeez. How would that work?

Easy, here in PA the price of gas dropped so they raised taxes hoping no one would notice.

12 posted on 01/10/2014 4:41:52 AM PST by Ramcat (Thank You American Veterans)
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To: Ramcat

That I believe.


13 posted on 01/10/2014 4:42:36 AM PST by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: ckilmer

How will this increase in production yield measurable profits? The increased supply at cheaper prices have lowered the price. Lower unit sales price means less profit.

How can I invest to benefit from the change?


14 posted on 01/10/2014 4:48:25 AM PST by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... History is a process, not an event)
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To: clearcarbon

Let’s hope US Economy does not follow Saudia Arabia’s petroleum enabled welfare model.


15 posted on 01/10/2014 4:51:44 AM PST by Tugo (O5)
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To: bert

“How can I invest to benefit from the change?”

Look into power generation capacity investments. Heck, the UK government just set a strike price of £155 per megawatt hour for offshore wind farm energy production. That’s three times the price of wholesale electricity.

I also expect that the UK will be importing gobs of gas from the US in the near future. The Brits are not happy with Russian gas imports and the clunky Norway gas pipeline can no longer be relied on. In addition, North Sea production is in decline.

You might look into gas export facilities here in the US for investment plays.

Do your own research. Have fun.


16 posted on 01/10/2014 6:28:08 AM PST by sergeantdave
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To: bert

How will this increase in production yield measurable profits? The increased supply at cheaper prices have lowered the price. Lower unit sales price means less profit.
...........
correct. it ain’t as easy as it looks to invest in the right companies.


17 posted on 01/10/2014 10:34:37 AM PST by ckilmer
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas

Amazing.

But imagine how much worse our economy would be without this.
..................
all the terrible things we’ve heard from the gold bugs about federal fiat money would be true if it were not for the incredible money miracle that increased oil production is performing.


18 posted on 01/10/2014 10:44:01 AM PST by ckilmer
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To: txrefugee

Absolutely NO credit should be given to Obama and the rest of the enviro-nazis, who have done everything they could to stand in the way of this energy boom. They wasted billions of tax dollars funneling money to their cronies in green energy scams at the same time. If life were fair, they should have all frozen to death last week.
..............
agree. they still may well succeed in throttling production by making agreements with Iran that result in that country bringing a couple million barrels onto the market and killing the price of oil prematurely.

(I’m in favor of killing the price of oil but not until the USA is full oil independent. Some of the prolific fields have break even in the 80-90 dollar range. A drop in the price of oil would throttle their production.


19 posted on 01/10/2014 10:46:51 AM PST by ckilmer
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To: clearcarbon

The post-obama era could be very prosperous for America.
............
Yes. That’s the bottom line. There’s a great tide of money coming the way of the USA. Its a tide that first receded back in the 1970’s with the first OPEC oil strike.

One result of the incoming tide of money is that federal budgets will balance and social security will be solvent for the next 40 years.


20 posted on 01/10/2014 10:49:44 AM PST by ckilmer
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To: txrefugee

It’s pretty funny. If you believe that Obama is trying to tank the US economy and cloward-piven us into socialism, God just threw a big monkey wrench in his machinery.


21 posted on 01/10/2014 1:35:28 PM PST by ez (Muslims do not play well with others.)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas

Puhleeeeez. How would that work?

So tell me how capitalism’s supply and demand works again?
Get smart.


22 posted on 01/10/2014 2:27:58 PM PST by lucky american (The Democrats will follow the big "D"even if it means going over a cliff.)
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To: ckilmer

North Dakota has more oil than Saudi Arabia. Why are we importing any oil. The converion of coal to natural gas means that we have about 100 years of coal gas.


23 posted on 01/10/2014 5:50:30 PM PST by Young Werther (Julius Caesar said "Quae cum ita sunt. Since these things are so.".)
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To: ckilmer

Looking at the chart showing oil and gas production
booming one can only guess what coal would be doing
if we were still building coal facilities, not shutting
them down.


24 posted on 01/10/2014 5:57:48 PM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: lucky american

Too bad there is no way to get natural gas out to the rural consumers and put the propane ripoff artists out of work.


25 posted on 01/10/2014 6:02:51 PM PST by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: ckilmer; AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

Thanks ckilmer.


26 posted on 01/11/2014 4:27:59 AM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: thackney; EERinOK

thackney, I put the question below on the Permian basin to EERinOK who sounded knowledgeable.
.............................
Maybe you know the answer to this question.

Why is that production is not just exploding in the Permian basin.

There are so many stacked pay streaks one on top of the other that you would think they would be able to zoom up volumes and push down costs fairly rapidly. That sure is the case in the Baaken where they have a third the number of pay formations. But its not happening in the permian. costs remain high and volumes move up only incrementally.
.......................

I am not certain since I don’t work the Permain, but did just read an interesting article in Jour. Petroleum Technology about it.

the Permian is legacy oilfields, land positions are established and there is far less land competition since leases are held by production. so no rush by 100s of operators from majors to mom and pops, to punch a 1000 holes in the next 1-2 years.

operators are taking a slower measured approach to locate the best of many geographic and stratigraphic targets. in a sense still exploratory, not large scale development yet.

another reason that might have to take a more diligent quality over quantity approach is that it is oil in the rock, not gas with 50 times gas viscosity in low permeability. a bust well is true bust, total loss. at least in the gas shales and eagleford there is some gas cash flow even on marginal wells.

once the geology is better understood, identifying where the permeability is located, it could go nuts like the eagleford & bakken. a lot of the horizontal activity is on the basin fringes, not in existing 50-60 year old depleted fields, so again, today it seems more exploratory rather than field development phase.


27 posted on 01/11/2014 8:06:35 AM PST by ckilmer
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