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The Selling of Attention Deficit Disorder
New York Times ^ | 14 December 2013 | ALAN SCHWARZ

Posted on 01/17/2014 6:33:22 PM PST by Lorianne

After more than 50 years leading the fight to legitimize attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Keith Conners could be celebrating.

.

Severely hyperactive and impulsive children, once shunned as bad seeds, are now recognized as having a real neurological problem. Doctors and parents have largely accepted drugs like Adderall and Concerta to temper the traits of classic A.D.H.D., helping youngsters succeed in school and beyond.

But Dr. Conners did not feel triumphant this fall as he addressed a group of fellow A.D.H.D. specialists in Washington. He noted that recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that the diagnosis had been made in 15 percent of high school-age children, and that the number of children on medication for the disorder had soared to 3.5 million from 600,000 in 1990. He questioned the rising rates of diagnosis and called them “a national disaster of dangerous proportions.”

“The numbers make it look like an epidemic. Well, it’s not. It’s preposterous,” Dr. Conners, a psychologist and professor emeritus at Duke University, said in a subsequent interview. “This is a concoction to justify the giving out of medication at unprecedented and unjustifiable levels.”

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: adhd

1 posted on 01/17/2014 6:33:22 PM PST by Lorianne
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To: null and void
“This is a concoction to justify the giving out of medication at unprecedented and unjustifiable levels.” — Dr. Keith Conner, who led the fight to legitimize attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Conspiracy talk!
(And rather ironic/amusing, too!)

2 posted on 01/17/2014 6:38:43 PM PST by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: Lorianne

IIRC, I read that once you start on these drugs...because they have messed up your brain...you will need meds for life.


3 posted on 01/17/2014 6:38:58 PM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: Lorianne

I understand there is a communications company that does nothing but create previously unheard of names for every new drug that the pharmaceutical industry brings to market. This communications company receives exceptionally large sums of money for successfully naming each new drug. Just looking at the proprietary (as opposed to chemical) names of the drugs mentioned in the article is a cause for wonder. The names are truly unique and ingenious by any measure. I wonder why we as a country are so talented at these types of tasks yet have succeeded in selling out the rest of our middle-class-sustaining economy to the Far East and South and Central America?


4 posted on 01/17/2014 6:49:00 PM PST by 4Runner
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To: Lorianne
Autism is similar. It used to be a fairly exotic diagnosis. Now, almost everyone is autistic or has asperger's syndrome.

I do see the possibility that modern changes in diet and "advances" in food science (GM food, hormones, etc) may increase the percentage of people having certain disabilities, but largely this is just medical professionals over-diagnosing people and creating larger marketplaces for their services.

Depression is another. It's real. It exists. Medicine can help some people. But a lot of the people on the medicine could get better help without the medicine. But Zoloft is easy, and it's profitable. So there you go.

5 posted on 01/17/2014 7:12:28 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Anti-Complacency League! Baby!)
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To: ClearCase_guy

And the Prozac generic is $4.00 at Wal*Mart.


6 posted on 01/17/2014 7:15:38 PM PST by upchuck (Stop this abuse now! Get behind Convention of States: http://bit.ly/1ak1Iz9)
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To: ClearCase_guy
A diagnosis of ADHD and such will at some near future date will make you ineligible to own a fire arm.

CC

7 posted on 01/17/2014 7:19:43 PM PST by Captain Compassion
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To: Lorianne

If it has the word disorder in it, it’s fake.


8 posted on 01/17/2014 7:30:08 PM PST by lurk
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To: Sacajaweau
I took Ritalin for several years as a kid. Hey, it was the 80's, we didn't know any better then. I went from being free-spirited and emotional to cold and calculating. I'm still cold and calculating today, because I learned that by embracing it, I could get ahead. I went from being a classic extrovert to being the exceptional-strong-INTJ I am now. Not that I'm complaining - I like who I am, and think most emotional extroverts are weak. The point is, though, that Ritalin makes permanent changes to the brain's functions - terrifying changes. Children go from being happy carefree fun machines to being criminal masterminds under the effects of the chemicals contained in that particular product. Several other people I grew up with that took it in larger doses for longer periods developed OCD tendencies later in life, a few were involved in some of the case studies on the drug. My sister did a paper on it in college using me as her inspiration. Her findings were downright frightening, to say the least.

Consequently, I had an employer who found out I used to be a Ritalin taker, and he decided he wanted me back on it to keep working for him. I told him to lay me off or I was calling the law. I found a new job the next week.
9 posted on 01/17/2014 7:57:31 PM PST by arderkrag (An Unreconstructed Georgian, STANDING WITH RAND.)
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To: lurk; Sacajaweau

Not fake, just not nearly as widespread as it looks. There are no doubt a lot of false diagnoses, and there probably *is* a negative effect to the medication for those who don’t need it. But, there are people who genuinely have the problem, and for whom the medication is warranted. Like me.

I was diagnosed with ADD (non-hyperactive) back in the 80s as a junior in high school. I had been getting Cs and Ds (and more than a few Fs), despite being far more capable than many of my peers. After more than 6 months of evaluation at Umass Medical Worcester, I was put on Ritalin, and almost immediately saw results. I was diagnosed halfway through junior year, with a GPA in the 2.5 range, and was getting all As by the end of that year. I made honor roll my senior year, and my SAT qualified me for Mensa. I stopped taking the medication once I finished college, and have so far not needed it since. I even managed to get a Masters Cum Laude through distance learning without it, due to the learning skills I was able to internalize back when I had been taking medication.


10 posted on 01/17/2014 7:57:48 PM PST by Little Pig (Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici.)
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To: lurk
Umm...really?
11 posted on 01/17/2014 7:59:06 PM PST by arderkrag (An Unreconstructed Georgian, STANDING WITH RAND.)
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To: Lorianne

The government at work to dumb down and drug all the active and thinking children of America so that they will be drug addicts by their teen years and thereby destroyed by the evil DC monsters using uninformed to do their will.


12 posted on 01/17/2014 7:59:54 PM PST by kindred (Conservative third party or America is dead, the golden goose has been stabbed to many times)
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To: arderkrag; lurk; Sacajaweau

And to address the INTJ thing, I was always INTJ, and while I did notice a bit less creativity while I was on medication, I found that losing it was not permanent. When not taking it, I am emotionally back to how I was before I started. I’m not saying it isn’t a bad thing, for some people, but I don’t feel it has had any negative effects on me.


13 posted on 01/17/2014 8:01:11 PM PST by Little Pig (Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici.)
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To: Captain Compassion

Thank god for Armslist, then.


14 posted on 01/17/2014 8:02:50 PM PST by Little Pig (Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici.)
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To: Little Pig

Everyone’s chemistry is a little different. It may have been great for you, and that’s fine. But I would rather just be me on pure air. I don’t think the world needs to see me pushed even further down the INTJ line when my percentages average at 80% in all categories.


15 posted on 01/17/2014 8:04:41 PM PST by arderkrag (An Unreconstructed Georgian, STANDING WITH RAND.)
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To: arderkrag

[I took Ritalin for several years as a kid. Hey, it was the 80’s, we didn’t know any better then. I went from being free-spirited and emotional to cold and calculating.]

Most parents are fools and allow their children to be drugged so they do not have to be parents to them. And it is the male children who are largely overdosed and most wind up using drugs, over 80% become addicts and many commit suicide and yet most American homes are full of ritilan boys.


16 posted on 01/17/2014 8:06:51 PM PST by kindred (Conservative third party or America is dead, the golden goose has been stabbed to many times)
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To: ClearCase_guy

There have always been people trying to diagnose kids who don’t fit in.

A classmate of mine would have been classic Asperger’s syndrome. It was really because he was uniquely brilliant. He didn’t have a lot of social skills because he was teaching himself college level science when he was in second and third grade.

Our teacher tried to have him sent out to a “special” school but failed.

Now, he’s a college professor doing cutting edge research. I’m sure the meds would have made him more normal in grade school, but what would they have done with the rest of his life?


17 posted on 01/17/2014 8:11:42 PM PST by MediaMole
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To: MediaMole

They tried to put my kid on drugs for ADD or ADHD back in the 80’s and I refused to allow it. My kid was extremely smart and was bored in class but they failed to stimulate his mind and earn his respect. He could spot a fake and a hippocrite in a NY second.

I am so glad I didn’t allow them to destroy his body along with his mind. I took him home and home schooled him and he soared.

They were so adamant that he HAD to have some hyperactivity disorder that they called me a liar when I informed him that he slept like a rock. The kid was flat out bored. He was also an awesome multitasker so he could be playing with his cars under his desk, talking to the kid beside him, and listening to his teacher all at once and not loose a beat. They couldn’t comprehend that. Today, he’s a drummer.

They insisted he was going to end up in prison for murder when he reached puberty...he became a prison guard instead. He was non violent. He just didn’t put up with injustice nor would he allow himself to be downtalked to.

I know there are some very good eduators out there, I met some in my own life, but I’m sorry to say that the majority are idiots who never grew up.


18 posted on 01/17/2014 8:29:07 PM PST by PrairieLady2
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To: ClearCase_guy

Oh it’s not just the medical field to blame here. Parents want a quick chemical fix. I can’t tell you how often the kids I see on these drugs have no daddy and and a mom with zero parenting skills. Parents have also learned that to get their kid labeled can mean a check (SSI), and even middle class parents learn it can be an advantage, special tutors and classes, ability to get special perks on standardized tests, and Precious Snowflake is immune to discipline in the school. And the schools push for as many kids as possible to be on the drugs because it means more money, special ed teachers psychologists, learning labs etc etc. Lots of people profit and share the blame here.


19 posted on 01/17/2014 8:30:49 PM PST by Kozak ("Send them back your fierce defiance! Stamp upon the cursed alliance! To arms, to arms in Dixie!)
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To: Little Pig

I had my school problems starting in the first grade in the early 50s. By Junior high I was spending as much time in the headmistress’s office as in class. Threats did no good. I could be good for a couple weeks and then go off my trolly. I never did anything really bad, but The woman told my parents that I was like a fly buzzing around her head. She said I should see a Dr. Unfortunately, ADHD had not been discovered yet. I was an introvert and had few friends. I didn’t want anyone to know what condition I was in—they would think I was crazy . This is real, but I would say it affects about one per cent or less of the population. It is rare for a female to have ADHD. I am 70 and still disorganized and spend much of my time doing unproductive tasks.


20 posted on 01/17/2014 9:11:08 PM PST by RightLady
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To: Lorianne

And we put them and their young brains on speed pills.

THIS is the absolute source of all the spree shootings and school shootings. They are almost all speed freak pill poppers. It isn’t guns.


21 posted on 01/17/2014 9:44:26 PM PST by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office.)
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To: Lorianne

I have ADHD.

I take 12 year old Scotch to level out....

/s

maybe

I dunno

Not really

Bi-Polar?


22 posted on 01/17/2014 10:40:49 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: Lorianne

total BS it’s nothing more than dumbing down inteligent kids to the lowest dumb shit in the class!


23 posted on 01/17/2014 10:50:33 PM PST by dalereed
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The overlooked common denominator (cough) is of course public education.

Stop drugging those Absolutely Disinterested & Dissatisfied with the prison of Public Education.


24 posted on 01/17/2014 11:04:22 PM PST by Gene Eric (Don't be a statist!)
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To: Little Pig
I was put on Ritalin, and almost immediately saw results.

Long ago, back in my former life as a teacher, I saw that same thing several times. I had a kid who was pretty bright but never accomplished anything. Not hyper but never attentive. Never completed assignments, test, homework. One day, he started volunteering answers in class, taking notes, and his grades quickly shot up. No, he didn't seem stoned, he seemed alive finally.

I had several just like him over the years. I see less like that, so I am sure the meds are doing well for them.

I talked to his mother a few weeks later and she mentioned that he was on the med and asked me how he was doing. I was able to tell tell her when he began.

I had another kid who was just like him a couple years later who didn't want to take any medicine. He accomplished little in his classes.

25 posted on 01/17/2014 11:58:18 PM PST by Right Wing Assault
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To: Right Wing Assault

Exactly. My senior year, I ended up with the two most dreaded teachers in the school, in English and Math. I was the top student in both classes, and for me the work was nearly effortless. After a while the math teacher even had to tell me to stop answering so many of the questions he posed in the classroom, so other students might have a chance to catch up (I usually ended up having to answer anyway, because so few others in the class were able to keep up with the level of work he demanded).

In college, the discussion days for my History course usually devolved into me vs the TA, with everyone else staring blankly, and I lost at least two roommates because I never had to study extensively even for difficult courses, and they couldn’t manage their studies with me relaxing around the house.

It always drives me crazy when people start spouting off about how the whole ADD thing is a scam or con and a way just to push unneeded drugs on kids. It’s not, or at least not only that. Some of us really need them.


26 posted on 01/18/2014 12:43:55 AM PST by Little Pig (Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici.)
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To: Little Pig

My son was diagnosed with ADD at age 6. Medication got him through high school, although we still had a few rough patches. He quit taking it in his mid 20s and is now married, has a daughter (who has also been diagnosed as ADD), a steady job, and a mortgage. My 2 daughters were diagnosed with it but since it was mild and not causing problems in school, they never took medication for it before. My husband was diagnosed with it 20 years ago and takes daily medication, and I was informally diagnosed with the inattentive form, which I self treat with copious amounts of caffeine, lol.

I can spot an ADD person immediately after meeting and talking with them. It’s very apparent, and if medication helps their condition, I won’t begrudge them taking it. ADD is very real, and the people who claim it isn’t are full of it!


27 posted on 01/18/2014 4:10:42 AM PST by Prince of Space (Be Breitbart, baby. LIFB.)
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To: Lorianne

In other news.....researchers have found a cure for ADHD.

They found that cellulose has a dramatic effect upon the prevention and cure for the dreaded disease.

This amazing product can be found in wooden paddles wielded by men (dads) and applied to the backsides of little brats.

Isn’t this an amazing discovery?


28 posted on 01/18/2014 4:37:36 AM PST by DH (Once the tainted finger of government touches anything the rot begins)
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To: MediaMole

Love this story. They kept trying to send my very high IQ son to vocational school in high school. He took the GED his sophomore year and his lowest score was 96 percentile. It sort of rocked them a bit and he went off to college. He worked on his social and warrior skills in college. He realized he needed to expand his skill sets. I see it over and over again, square peg round hole.

Which is why my grandson is in private school. We all pitch in on tuition. At that they had him take two years in one and are still adding more material.

Public school system has no place for those students who fall outside of a narrow band or who don’t fit in the “learning disabled” category. My son has said that if he were in school today, they would drug him.

I sometimes think that the school system actually kills the drive to learn.


29 posted on 01/18/2014 6:05:30 AM PST by Roses0508
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