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Company involved in W.Va. chemical spill files for Chapter 11
Yahoo news ^

Posted on 01/18/2014 1:34:39 PM PST by djf

Freedom Industries, the unfortunately named company whose chemical leak contaminated the water supply for parts of West Virginia, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Friday.

The company voted to pursue bankruptcy protection during a voluntary board meeting on Friday, according to WVNS-TV. The Wall Street Journal reports official company papers from the meeting estimate their debt at roughly $10 million, which does not include the impending clean-up costs and lawsuits, which will no doubt be immense.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bankruptcy; chemicalspill; westvirginia

1 posted on 01/18/2014 1:34:39 PM PST by djf
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Comment #2 Removed by Moderator

To: djf

Freedom Industries is incorporated in WV. It’s owned by a PA corporation. This a real example of astute lawyering for the despicable.


3 posted on 01/18/2014 1:38:29 PM PST by meatloaf (Impeach Obama. That's my New Year's resolution.)
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To: meatloaf

So, will this filing make paying any proceeds impossible from the up and coming class action lawsuits?


4 posted on 01/18/2014 1:41:43 PM PST by berdie
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To: berdie
There are so many things wrong here that it's hard to count them.

The last time this place had an inspection from either the state or federals was 1991. During that inspection, the air quality was examined, not the tanks, berm, drains, etc.

5 posted on 01/18/2014 1:46:49 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Very smart. Blame Bush.


6 posted on 01/18/2014 1:51:59 PM PST by DIRTYSECRET (urope. Why do they put up with this.)
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To: berdie

From what I’ve read the owner set up a corporation to lend money to Freedom Industries which put the lender first to claim any money under bankruptcy. There’s nothing there for proceeds. Unless there’s a smarter lawyer out there, the plaintiffs are screwed from the git go.


7 posted on 01/18/2014 1:52:17 PM PST by meatloaf (Impeach Obama. That's my New Year's resolution.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

The reality is that the chemical is not a toxic substance/hazardous material. There’s no way to change the law unless you have the gazillions to start inspecting lots of other stuff nationwide. WV can’t pay people what they’re worth now. Good luck affording more of them.

While it was a mess, it wasn’t a catastrophe. If anything, I’d look at the water company who didn’t know the stuff had bypassed their carbon filters. That may be an issue nationwide. If I was a terrorist that would be my take away from the incident. The water treatment plant is the weak point.

Inspect everything you want as far as chemical storage, but until every water treatment plant is instrumented to know they’ve been attacked either deliberately or accidentaly, we’re vulnerable.


8 posted on 01/18/2014 1:59:08 PM PST by meatloaf (Impeach Obama. That's my New Year's resolution.)
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To: djf
not quick enough, I reckon.
you know litigation lawyers
(5% of the bad spoils give the other 95% bad name)

9 posted on 01/18/2014 2:01:18 PM PST by skinkinthegrass (The end move in politics is always to pick up a gun..0'Caligula / 0'Reid / 0'Pelosi :-)
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To: meatloaf

Thanks for your reply. I figured that might be the case.


10 posted on 01/18/2014 2:16:40 PM PST by berdie
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To: meatloaf
If anything, I’d look at the water company who didn’t know the stuff had bypassed their carbon filters.

Most water plants would be able to handle a chemical spill. Not all water plants even have carbon filters and most water plants are only secondary systems, not tertiary. Plus as you noted the chemical is not considered hazardous, so there is no reason the water plant would even be screening/filtering for it.

Activated carbon (AC) is generally used in water treatment for removing free chlorine and / or organic compounds. Removal of organics from potable water could be to prevent common organic acids such as humic or fulvic from reacting with chlorine to form trihalomethanes (a class of known carcinogens) or, to treat waste water to remove any number of organic compounds to make the water suitable for discharge. Similar to other types of water treatment, however, AC filtration is effective for some contaminants and not effective for others. AC filtration does not remove microbes, sodium, nitrates, fluoride, and hardness. Lead and other heavy metals are removed only by a very specific type of activated carbon water treatment and this would typically only be feasible for point-of-use household filters. Activated Carbon Filters

11 posted on 01/18/2014 2:31:06 PM PST by EBH ( The Day of the Patriot has arrived.)
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To: djf

The timing of hatred for coal is too much. No one can convince me there isn’t some laundered deal inside and payoff to leak the chemical. 0bvmmer and his commies are involved.


12 posted on 01/18/2014 2:59:09 PM PST by CincyRichieRich (Pajama-boy-in-chief's beatings continue until morale improves.)
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To: meatloaf
I'd challenge the “not toxic” designation. I don't buy into the suggestion that this material is benign or that the river is a sewer anyway, as another poster put it.

I mined coal in my younger years. We improved the land by surface mining the coal.

Conservatives shouldn't identify with despoiling the environment.

13 posted on 01/18/2014 3:17:10 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: djf

Wow...West Virginia is really under assault.


14 posted on 01/18/2014 4:05:35 PM PST by what's up
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To: EBH

The issue in mind is how would a treatment plant know if a toxic substance had entered and wasn’t removed by treatment.


15 posted on 01/18/2014 4:48:42 PM PST by meatloaf (Impeach Obama. That's my New Year's resolution.)
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To: meatloaf

input and output sensors.


16 posted on 01/18/2014 5:04:36 PM PST by SgtHooper (If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.)
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To: SgtHooper

“...input and output sensors....”
-
Sensors that sense “what”?


17 posted on 01/18/2014 5:10:37 PM PST by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: meatloaf

They wouldn’t until people started dropping dead or showing up in ER’s.


18 posted on 01/18/2014 7:00:58 PM PST by EBH ( The Day of the Patriot has arrived.)
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To: SgtHooper

There is no such thing as sensors that ‘sense’ every contaminate.


19 posted on 01/18/2014 7:01:54 PM PST by EBH ( The Day of the Patriot has arrived.)
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To: EBH

Agreed. But water treatment plants typically monitor output for the chems they are obligated to monitor.

From GE Systems:

“Because of the many technological developments in electronics and microprocessor technology over the last decade, there is a wide range of instrumentation available to monitor water treatment systems. The following sections address the systems available to monitor conductivity. pH, corrosion rate, turbidity, dissolved oxygen. sodium, fouling, biological activity, and halogens.”

These are only a few characteristics that can be auto-sensed.


20 posted on 01/18/2014 9:34:03 PM PST by SgtHooper (If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.)
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To: SgtHooper

Yes, but if a chemical...as in this case is not considered hazardous, then they won’t be monitoring for it.

Also note the excerpt you posted does not include ...chemicals.


21 posted on 01/19/2014 6:04:11 AM PST by EBH ( The Day of the Patriot has arrived.)
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To: EBH

As I indicated previously, they will only monitor what they are required to monitor. Chemicals have properties that may, just may, affect the readings on the sensors. Look, I’m not going debate nits over this. Hell, given it’s WV, they prolly only ensure that a liquid exits the plant.


22 posted on 01/19/2014 10:53:58 AM PST by SgtHooper (If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.)
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To: SgtHooper
A man who spent several hours trapped in a pipe at a United Water facility on Wilson Avenue was rescued Friday morning and then promptly arrested.

Capt. Michael Fountain of the Manalapan Police Department said the man was 26-year-old township resident Asaf Mohammad, who was arrested for fourth-degree criminal trespass

United Water spokesman Rich Henning said that workers “heard cries for help” coming from an area that has a wellhead with a storage tank when they arrived at the facility on Friday morning.

Jim Mastrokalos, director of operations for United Water, said the man was found in a decommissioned pipe that is 20 inches in diameter.

“He must have traversed through a basin and climbed up into a pipe for reasons unknown at this time,” Mastrokalos said.

United Water is investigating surveillance video to determine how Mohammed was able to get into the facility, which is surrounded by barbed wire fencing, Mastrokalos said.

After sections of the pipe were dismantled, emergency responders were able to get a harness around the man and pull him out of the pipe.

Mohammed was reportedly flown to Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center after being removed from the pipe


23 posted on 01/20/2014 12:44:01 PM PST by EBH ( The Day of the Patriot has arrived.)
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To: EBH

LOL, Ok, so they do check for actual $hit in their system as well. Is this for real?


24 posted on 01/20/2014 12:47:32 PM PST by SgtHooper (If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.)
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To: SgtHooper

Wow, it is. Now how suspicious is that!? Future terroristic act.


25 posted on 01/20/2014 12:49:15 PM PST by SgtHooper (If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.)
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