Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Scrap TV license or public support for BBC will ‘fall off a cliff’ warns ex-Crimewatch host…
Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 15:09 EST, 3 February 2014 | Matt Chorley

Posted on 02/04/2014 3:22:05 PM PST by Olog-hai

The BBC license fee should be scrapped and replaced with a voluntary subscription service, TV presenter Nick Ross has claimed.

The former host of Crimewatch warned support for the BBC would “fall off a cliff” if the mandatory charge for all owners of a television set is not axed, but the Corporation hit back saying the change would mean fewer people paying much more each year to maintain a quality service.

Viewers must buy a TV license for £145.50 if they want to watch live broadcasts, but they can legally avoid paying by waiting until their favorite show is available on BBC iPlayer instead. …

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: bbc; governmentmedia; nickross; tvlicense
Full Daily Mail title:
Scrap the TV license or public support for the BBC will ‘fall off a cliff’, warns ex-Crimewatch host Nick Ross
Public ownership ought to be done away with too.
1 posted on 02/04/2014 3:22:05 PM PST by Olog-hai
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Yep. The BBC is state-owned.


2 posted on 02/04/2014 3:26:39 PM PST by familyop (We Baby Boomers are croaking in an avalanche of corruption smelled around the planet.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

In Britain, can you get an AppleTV and not have to pay the TV tax? Don’t know why anyone would pay the tax.


3 posted on 02/04/2014 3:38:27 PM PST by Defiant (Obama is The Bard of Canard.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

It would almost be worth it for more of this.

Top gear - Set fire to Piers Morgan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onjPdHUa13w


4 posted on 02/04/2014 3:45:17 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Defiant
In Britain, can you get an AppleTV and not have to pay the TV tax? Don’t know why anyone would pay the tax.

The tax only applies to over-the-air broadcasts. You pay it because the British government has a huge bureaucracy including roaming vans checking for TV reception and matching hits against the roll of taxpayers.

We can laugh but ...

5 posted on 02/04/2014 3:55:56 PM PST by BfloGuy ( Even the opponents of Socialism are dominated by socialist ideas.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: BfloGuy

Is the tax 145 pounds every year?


6 posted on 02/04/2014 4:03:04 PM PST by GunsareOK
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek

All three of the petrol-heads are the best on TV anywhere!


7 posted on 02/04/2014 4:09:22 PM PST by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: BfloGuy
I stayed at a B&B in Cardiff, Wales that advertised a "fully licensed TV & bar". That's a big draw. I don't drink alcoholic beverages or watch TV. Perhaps there is another B&B without that nonsense and a lower rate...yup! Worth the effort to offset the ghastly price of gasoline.
8 posted on 02/04/2014 4:10:16 PM PST by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: familyop

Don’t you mean Labour Party owned?


9 posted on 02/04/2014 4:10:21 PM PST by JSDude1 (Defeat Hagan, elect a Constutional Conservative: Dr. Greg Brannon!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: GunsareOK

Yes. Every year. We lived there 11 years and witnessed those vans looking for people with unpaid TV tax frequently. You keep your tax receipt from one year to the next just in case. Ours was always taped to our TV.


10 posted on 02/04/2014 4:15:16 PM PST by leapfrog0202 ("the American presidency is not supposed to be a journey of personal discovery" Sarah Palin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: wally_bert

I’d fix the American version by getting rid of Rutlidge and the comedian and replacing them with Jay Leno and Kenny Wallace. I’m not thrilled with Tanner Foust but he at least knows cars.


11 posted on 02/04/2014 4:16:54 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

In Canada, CBC is supported by general tax revenue, and commercial advertising; rather than a tax on TV viewing. A few decades ago, the British funding model was probably fairer, because not everyone watched TV. Also, you could only receive stations within broadcasting range. The license fee was a form of user-pay. A lot has changed since then, and the British model no longer makes sense.


12 posted on 02/04/2014 4:25:49 PM PST by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: leapfrog0202
I thought those were cat detector vans from the Ministry of Ousinge. I never seen so many bleeding aerials. The man said that their equipment could pinpoint a purr at four hundred yards!
13 posted on 02/04/2014 4:27:35 PM PST by mikey_hates_everything
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek

I tried watching an episode but after a couple of minutes I couldn’t stand the coy, vance, and vance show that someone on here called it.

Jay Leno would be a good choice or Adam Corolla.


14 posted on 02/04/2014 4:34:12 PM PST by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: GunsareOK
Yes, and ironically that’s just for color TV. They still have a cheaper black & white TV license for £49 per year; they may get rid of it in 2016 once they do their charter review.
15 posted on 02/04/2014 6:31:41 PM PST by Olog-hai
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: mikey_hates_everything
Reading about the vans, I thought the exact same thing, getting a license for "Eric, the Fish!" "Eric, the Cat" was very happy, they'd get Eric in an instant!

Mark

16 posted on 02/04/2014 8:27:02 PM PST by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: mikey_hates_everything
"Hello. It’s just gone 8 o’clock and time for the penguin on top of your television set to explode."


17 posted on 02/04/2014 8:30:47 PM PST by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

When I lived in Northern Ireland about 40 years ago the fee was 50 quid a year. 50 or 145 quid a year...we all pay a hell of a lot more than that for satellite or cable...and we get less...


18 posted on 02/04/2014 9:07:24 PM PST by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

We pay for PBS whether we watch it or not.


19 posted on 02/04/2014 9:09:26 PM PST by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: mikey_hates_everything

That’s great!


20 posted on 02/04/2014 10:35:36 PM PST by leapfrog0202 ("the American presidency is not supposed to be a journey of personal discovery" Sarah Palin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai
Public ownership ought to be done away with too.
”Liberals” - socialists - continually use euphemisms to pretty up their tyrannical scheme. This has a double effect - first the evasion of what they actually mean, and secondly to subvert the language in a newspeak sense. The use of the term “liberal” is a classic of the genre; in 1919 nobody would have understood you if you inveighed against “liberals” - they would have taken you to be against the very things you are for.

FA Hayek learned English as a teen in America before 1920, moved to Britain, and subsequently wrote his classic The Road to Serfdom in 1944. In his preface to the 1956 edition Hayek wrote:

The fact that this book was originally written with only the British public in mind does not appear to have seriously affected its intelligibility for the American reader. But there is one point of phraseology which I ought to explain here to forestall any misunderstanding. I use throughout the term "liberal" in the original nineteenth-century sense in which it is still current in Britain. In current American usage it often means very nearly the opposite of this. It has been part of the camouflage of leftist movements in this country, helped by the muddleheadedness of many who really believe in liberty, that "liberal" has come to mean the advocacy of almost every kind of government control. I am still puzzled why those in the United States who truly believe in liberty should not only have allowed the left to appropriate this almost indispensable term but should even have assisted by beginning to use it themselves as a term of opprobrium. This seems to be particularly regrettable because of the consequent tendency of many true liberals to describe themselves as conservatives.

It is true, of course, that in the struggle against the believers in the all-powerful state the true liberal must sometimes make common cause with the conservative, and in some circumstances, as in contemporary Britain, he has hardly any other way of actively working for his ideals. But true liberalism is still distinct from conservatism, and there is danger in the two being confused. Conservatism, through a necessary element in any stable society, is not a social program; in its paternalistic, nationalistic, and power-adoring tendencies it is often closer to socialism than true liberalism; and with its traditionalistic, anti-intellectual, and often mystical propensities it will never, except in short periods of disillusionment, appeal to the young and all those others who believe that some changes are desirable if this world is to become a better place. A conservative movement, by its very nature, is bound to be a defender of established privilege and to lean on the power of government for the protection of privilege. The essence of the liberal position, however, is the denial of all privilege, if privilege is understood in its proper and original meaning of the state granting and protecting rights to some which are not available on equal terms to others.

Safire’s New Political Dictionary dates the the inversion of the meaning of the term “liberal” - in America but not elsewhere - to the decade of the 1920s; that agrees with the fact that by 1933 FDR unselfconsciously referred to himself as a liberal.

All of this is to make the point that when socialists use the term “public” when they mean nothing other than government, we should reject that nomenclature. Were I the Speaker of the House of Representatives I would make it a House Rule that anyone could object to any speech with used the euphemism “public” or “society” when they mean nothing other than government. The phenomenon of which I complain here is hardly new:

Common Sense
by Thomas Paine

SOME writers have so confounded society with government, as to leave little or no distinction between them; whereas they are not only different, but have different origins. Society is produced by our wants, and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness POSITIVELY by uniting our affections, the latter NEGATIVELY by restraining our vices. The one encourages intercourse, the other creates distinctions. The first is a patron, the last a punisher.

Society in every state is a blessing, but Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one: for when we suffer, or are exposed to the same miseries BY A GOVERNMENT, which we might expect in a country WITHOUT GOVERNMENT, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer. Government, like dress, is the badge of lost innocence; the palaces of kings are built upon the ruins of the bowers of paradise. For were the impulses of conscience clear, uniform and irresistibly obeyed, man would need no other lawgiver; but that not being the case, he finds it necessary to surrender up a part of his property to furnish means for the protection of the rest; and this he is induced to do by the same prudence which in every other case advises him, out of two evils to choose the least. Wherefore, security being the true design and end of government, it unanswerably follows that whatever form thereof appears most likely to ensure it to us, with the least expense and greatest benefit, is preferable to all others.


21 posted on 02/05/2014 12:09:11 AM PST by conservatism_IS_compassion ("Liberalism” is a conspiracy against the public by wire-service journalism.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: conservatism_IS_compassion

Thanks for posting that Hayek quote, which I hadn’t seen before. The transatlantic confusion over the connotations of the term ‘liberal’ is as acute now as it was when he wrote it. In political debate across the pond between like-minded people it continues to cause fundamental mutual misunderstanding. But I’m grateful that here in Britain it’s still possible to use ‘liberal’ in its original, true, non-pejorative sense


22 posted on 02/05/2014 12:50:17 AM PST by Winniesboy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson