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Roger Goodell's NFL Compensation Exceeds $44M In 12-Month Period
SportsBusinessDaily ^ | February 14, 2014 | Daniel Kaplan

Posted on 02/14/2014 3:13:32 PM PST by xzins

The NFL paid Commissioner Roger Goodell $44.2M in the 12-month period that ended March 31, 2013, the league told SportsBusiness Journal earlier Friday. That figures include $9.1M of deferred pension and bonus earned the previous year. The league expects to file its tax return, which will include the pay figures, with the IRS on Tuesday. That return will show Goodell earned a $3.5M salary and a $40.36M bonus, though $5M of the bonus was earned the prior year. Disclosure of Goodell’s nearly $30M compensation at this time last year reverberated through the industry. Sean Gilbert, a contender for the top spot at the NFLPA, penned a book called the “The $29 Million ‘Tip,’” arguing Goodell’s pay was gratitude from owners for what the former player contends is a pro-management labor deal struck in ‘11. Even Congress has brought up Goodell’s pay as part of attacks on the league’s non-profit status. Prior to the '11 labor deal, Goodell’s top pay was $11.5M.

The league stressed that $9.1M of Goodell’s pay came from deferred bonus and pension from the ‘11 lockout period and that his true pay is around $35M. “Goodell’s compensation reflects our pay-for-performance philosophy and is appropriate given the fact that the NFL under his consistently strong leadership continues to grow,” NFL owners Arthur Blank, Robert Kraft and Jerry Richardson wrote in a letter to their fellow owners that is scheduled to be e-mailed friday afternoon. The three owners comprise the league’s compensation committee.

The pay almost assuredly makes Goodell the highest-paid sports exec. MLB in recent years changed its tax status to for-profit, so it no longer is required to make public its return, but when Commissioner Bud Selig signed his latest two-year contract in ‘12, ESPN reported the final year would pay him $22M, though other sources placed the figure north of that in the $30M range.


TOPICS: Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: nfl; nonprofit

1 posted on 02/14/2014 3:13:32 PM PST by xzins
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To: All

Normally, I wouldn’t care what some executive makes.

But the NFL is officially a “not for profit” enterprise.

All the belly-aching about “the rich” during the last campaign. I’m no fan of Romney’s, but this non-profit commissioner will make in 6 years what Romney’s made in a lifetime.


2 posted on 02/14/2014 3:13:58 PM PST by xzins ( Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who truly support our troops pray for victory!)
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To: xzins

Which Fox (or ex-Fox) news babe is Goodell married to?


3 posted on 02/14/2014 3:22:03 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Jane Skinner


4 posted on 02/14/2014 3:25:06 PM PST by xzins ( Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who truly support our troops pray for victory!)
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To: xzins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KKXektRX3Y

Married to Jane Skinner. She had a rather infamous blooper moment on Fox News back when she was anchoring.


5 posted on 02/14/2014 3:27:54 PM PST by Snickering Hound
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To: xzins

Roger Goodell is a despicable man who is trying to turn the NFL into the XFl. The NFL won’t be worth watching at all very soon.


6 posted on 02/14/2014 3:29:51 PM PST by nickcarraway
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To: xzins

That is a name from the past. Whatever happened to her?


7 posted on 02/14/2014 3:36:01 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: xzins
I don't understand anything about any of that. I don't watch football, never have, never will.

I take it back. I went to a High School football game in 1968 because my girlfriend wanted to.

8 posted on 02/14/2014 3:38:44 PM PST by elkfersupper
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Housewife and Mother.


9 posted on 02/14/2014 3:39:30 PM PST by John W (Viva Cristo Rey!)
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To: elkfersupper

If you don’t care for football, then even more unnerving should be the fact that the US government allows them non-profit status.


10 posted on 02/14/2014 3:41:10 PM PST by xzins ( Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who truly support our troops pray for victory!)
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To: xzins
If you don’t care for football, then even more unnerving should be the fact that the US government allows them non-profit status.

I dislike the US government even more than I dislike football.

11 posted on 02/14/2014 4:03:41 PM PST by elkfersupper
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To: xzins
It's not an unusual business arrangement, from what I understand. The NFL teams are separate business entities, and all of the league's revenues are reported on their tax returns.
12 posted on 02/14/2014 4:30:36 PM PST by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: xzins

And he enables owners to steal taxpayer dollars for their game factories. I care.


13 posted on 02/14/2014 4:31:22 PM PST by DManA
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To: xzins
The NFL is missing a huge revenue opportunity by not charging viewers to watch games at home. Yes, I know they get hundreds of millions of dollars from the networks but just think how much they would make if they charged people $25 a regular season game to watch it at home.

Now remember that the people at home have better seats than anybody in a stadium. Therefore they deserve to pay a premium to watch an NFL game at home.

The average football fan watches three games a week. That's $75 times 80,000,000 viewers and that equals $2 billion dollars in pure revenue.

Now multiply that over a 17 week NFL season (remember bye week) and you have $34 billion.

Now for the playoffs, you will want to charge $100 a game for the Wild Card week and given that 100,000,000 people will watch all four games, now you have $10 billion right there.

Ditto for the Divisional playoffs - another $10 billion

Now for the AFL and NFL title games, you will want to charge $250 a game and 150,000,000 will watch and you rake in $37.5 billion.

Finally the Super Bowl. Some 250,000,000 around the world will be watching. Charge $500 per person and that's a Super $125 billion.

So with me in charge, I will bring in a total of $216.5 billion in TV revenue.

14 posted on 02/14/2014 4:58:17 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: xzins

The League sure isn’t getting much for its money.


15 posted on 02/14/2014 7:55:48 PM PST by Arm_Bears (Shoot cops that shoot dogs.)
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To: Snickering Hound

Love that clip, because you could swap Shep and Jane and still make all the same jokes.


16 posted on 02/14/2014 9:20:36 PM PST by Dr.Deth
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To: xzins

“But the NFL is officially a “not for profit” enterprise.”

The NFL itself. Not the teams. “Not for profit” does not mean it is a charity, but rather that it nets zero. Anything “left” is not kept, but passed on to the teams where it is taxed...so there is nothing to tax except money passing through, which would be unreasonable.


17 posted on 02/15/2014 11:07:22 AM PST by lepton ("It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into"--Jonathan Swift)
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To: lepton

They get the lions share of their money by sales and not by donations. They negotiate deals and contracts for money, they sell merchandise and/or license merchandise for sale, they research means of greater revenue, and they take a portion of the proceeds for their personal and organizational funding.

Just because they spend all their profit doesn’t make them a non-profit.


18 posted on 02/15/2014 12:59:31 PM PST by xzins ( Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who truly support our troops pray for victory!)
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To: xzins

It has nothing to do with donations, unless you mean the revenue sharing between teams which goes through the NFL shell.. It has to do with the structure, and the structure is that the NFL shell retains nothing upon which to pay taxes on, and the funds are transferred to teams which do pay taxes on net earnings. Are you trying to argue that they should pay taxes on the money twice or more?


19 posted on 02/15/2014 8:07:29 PM PST by lepton ("It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into"--Jonathan Swift)
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To: lepton

I’m trying to argue that the corporate headquarters of a corporation comprised of many different businesses is playing a shell game if it pretends it isn’t trying to make a profit. Non-profit means something in the minds of normal people, and it means those who are exempt from taxes because its purpose is some kind of social benefit, and because it is not merely a cover for a money-making operation.


20 posted on 02/16/2014 2:48:19 AM PST by xzins ( Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who truly support our troops pray for victory!)
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To: SamAdams76

I think you will need different economic times to accomplish that.


21 posted on 02/16/2014 2:54:45 AM PST by John W (Viva Cristo Rey!)
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To: xzins

The difference between the for profit and not for profit designations is in paperwork they fill out, and in whether some funds are subject to double taxation if they follow certain paths. They aren’t illegitimately evading taxation by the designation.


22 posted on 02/16/2014 8:34:53 AM PST by lepton ("It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into"--Jonathan Swift)
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To: lepton

Crony capitalism at its worst protected by government.

Someone being paid 44 million in a “non-profit” job is rubbing the nation’s nose in his little corner of cronyland.


23 posted on 02/16/2014 4:48:11 PM PST by xzins ( Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who truly support our troops pray for victory!)
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To: SamAdams76

Interesting perspective. Part of the problem is that very few people would pay $25 to watch an NFL game at home. And once the number of viewers declines, the television advertising revenue will decline, too.


24 posted on 02/17/2014 10:28:44 AM PST by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: SamAdams76

Your proposal is interesting, but that’s $3000 per year to watch the games that you propose. I doubt the average fan would be willing (or able) to pay that. I am a casual fan; I usually watch at least part of a game on Sunday, but there is no way I would pay $25 to watch a game.

A pay-per-view option is interesting, but it needs to be set in the more $2.99-$5.99 price range, and it should only be out-of-market games. But the network affiliates wouldn’t like that, so it’s probably a non-starter.


25 posted on 02/17/2014 10:38:38 AM PST by Publius Valerius
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To: Alberta's Child
Part of the problem is that very few people would pay $25 to watch an NFL game at home. And once the number of viewers declines, the television advertising revenue will decline, too.

I think otherwise. Maybe that was true years ago when TV was crappy and you had to bang on the TV and bend a coat hanger to get the signal to come in halfway decent. Even with a decent signal, you had to deal with cheesy graphics and second-rate audio. Check out these highlights from a 1978 game and you get the picture of how awful it was. And this was a playoff game!

In recent years, the technological advances in televising football are simply astonishing. You are practically part of the action on the field now and soon you will have ability to control your own camera angles and rewind and replay whatever angle you choose. Then you have add-ons like the NFL Redzone experience - that allow you to automatically switch to games when a scoring opportunity presents itself. I saw this feature at my brother-in-laws house and words cannot describe how awesome that was. If I wasn't cutting my cable, I'd be signed up for it already. (BTW, I would pay $25 a game as a pay-per-view.)

People are giving up season tickets because the best seat in the house is now in their own living rooms. So you see, the very business model of televised football would change if it was no longer offered for free (along with that incessant barrage of obnoxious commercials).

I do think enough people would pay $25/game to not only make it feasible but to earn the NFL and networks even more revenues than they ever made before.

And yes, they could do it without commercials.

Sure, you would initially get a lot of outraged fans who would vow to never watch another game again. But slowly, they will come around and decide that $25/$50 for an afternoon of football is not such a bad deal after all. Especially when you can invite your friends over to split the cost and take advantage of all the technology you will have at your fingertips (ability to control camera angles with unlimited replays.)

26 posted on 02/17/2014 10:46:00 AM PST by SamAdams76
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To: Publius Valerius
Well yes, the pricepoint would probably have to be lower, at least to start. I was just using those numbers to make my point about the potential.

By the way, I think pay-per-view should extend to everything, not just sports. True a la carte audio programming. Not only would it make us be more selective with what we choose to watch (we might pick up a book a little more) but all the crap that we see on the 200+ channels will start to disappear. Quality programming will be directly rewarded.

27 posted on 02/17/2014 10:54:09 AM PST by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

If it were that strong a business opportunity I think the NFL would have done it by now. One big flaw I see in that model is that some games will generate hardly any revenue at all. Who — including die-hard fans of the teams themselves — would pay $25 to see a game between the Cleveland Browns and the Carolina Panthers?


28 posted on 02/17/2014 10:55:52 AM PST by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: SamAdams76
One big advantage of "free" television is that the NFL captures a lot of casual viewers who are very unlikely to pay $25 to see a game on TV. Heck -- the Super Bowl has become such a joke in recent decades that many long-time NFL fans consider the conference championship games to be the last "real" games of the season.

Pay-per-view is more likely to take hold in a sport that simply doesn't have much appeal to casual viewers. The NHL would probably be ideal for it, since it is much more of a "cult" sport than a "popular" sport.

29 posted on 02/17/2014 10:58:52 AM PST by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: Alberta's Child
Unless I am mistaken, I believe that the network revenue is pooled equally between the 32 NFL teams. Well they could do the same with the pay-per-view money. So even if most fans of the Cleveland Browns and Carolina Panthers choose to watch a Patriots-Jets game instead, it should not affect the revenues of their home teams.

So long as they choose to watch a game, the dollars will roll in!

30 posted on 02/17/2014 11:00:21 AM PST by SamAdams76
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