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California's Drought Isn't Due To Global Warming, But Politics
IDB ^ | 02/15/2013

Posted on 02/15/2014 6:12:50 PM PST by SeekAndFind

President Obama visited California's drought-hit Central Valley Friday, offering handouts and blaming global warming. But the state's water shortage is due to the left's refusal to deal with the state's water needs.

Following legislative action last month by Speaker John Boehner and California's Central Valley Representatives David Valadao, Devin Nunes and Kevin McCarthy, whose Sacramento-San Joaquin Valley Emergency Water Delivery Act was designed to resolve the long-standing problem of environmental water cutbacks that have devastated America's richest farmland, Obama is grandstanding in California, too.

His aim, however, is not a long-term solution for California's now-constant water shortages that have hit its $45 billion agricultural industry, but to preach about global warming. Instead of blaming the man-made political causes of California's worst water shortage, he's come with $2 billion in "relief" that's nothing but a tired effort to divert attention from fellow Democrats' dereliction of duty in using the state's water infrastructure.

The one thing that will mitigate droughts in California — a permanent feature of the state — is to restore the water flow from California's water-heavy north to farmers in the central and south. That's just what House Bill 3964, which passed by a 229-191 vote last week, does.

But Obama's plan is not to get that worthy bill through the Senate (where Democrats are holding it up) but to shovel pork to environmental activists and their victims, insultingly offering out-of-work farmers a "summer meal plan" in his package.

"We are not interested in welfare; we want water," Nunes told IBD this week.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.investors.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; US: California
KEYWORDS: california; climatechange; davidvaladao; devinnunes; drought; globalwarming; kevinmccarthy

1 posted on 02/15/2014 6:12:50 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Folks, this so called drought in the CA central Valley is PURELY MAN MADE.

Remember this : the Central Valley farmers is that had water taken from them by a federal judge, who put a baitfish ahead of human beings.

Central Valley’s water-management system was designed to deal with droughts that last as long as five years, but the reservoirs that held its lifeblood got emptied into the ocean to rescue the Delta smelt.


2 posted on 02/15/2014 6:14:26 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Here’s an article from 2012:

http://hotair.com/archives/2012/02/29/obama-ill-veto-bill-that-will-provide-water-to-californias-central-valley/

Obama: I’ll veto bill that will provide water to California’s Central Valley


3 posted on 02/15/2014 6:15:33 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...
His aim, however, is not a long-term solution for California's now-constant water shortages that have hit its $45 billion agricultural industry, but to preach about global warming. Instead of blaming the man-made political causes of California's worst water shortage, he's come with $2 billion in "relief" that's nothing but a tired effort to divert attention from fellow Democrats' dereliction of duty in using the state's water infrastructure.
Thanks SeekAndFind.
4 posted on 02/15/2014 6:20:33 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: SeekAndFind

Isn’t southern California a desert naturally?


5 posted on 02/15/2014 6:23:23 PM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: SeekAndFind

We drove down I-5 in the fall of 2009. From Los Banos to Bakersfield we saw numerous yellow signs that said ‘Congress Created Drought’. I hope this story spreads across the country. And it is COMPLETELY UNNECESSARY. Are any Dem Congresscritters affected by it?


6 posted on 02/15/2014 6:26:17 PM PST by originalbuckeye ("A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue;)
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To: SeekAndFind
California's system of aqueducts and storage tanks was designed ...to take advantage of rain and mountain runoff from wet years and store it for use in dry years...."California's forefathers built a system (of aqueducts and storage facilities) designed to withstand five years of drought," said Nunes.

...

Environmental special interests managed to dismantle the system by diverting water meant for farms to...saving delta smelt... [and] the flushing of 3 million acre-feet of water originally slated for the Central Valley into the ocean over the past five years.

7 posted on 02/15/2014 6:27:18 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Well, it’s a naturally arid region; years of drought have always been natural.


8 posted on 02/15/2014 6:27:37 PM PST by eclecticEel ("The petty man forsakes what lies within his power and longs for what lies with Heaven." - Xunzi)
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To: driftdiver

The Big Valley isn’t really desert (also not part of SoCal per se), but it does water for growing the kind of crops it can yield. It is an immensely productive region of our nation — when not being backstabbed by left wing politicians.


9 posted on 02/15/2014 6:30:52 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: SeekAndFind
I heard a climate scientist on the radio the other day, I came on in the middle, so I didn't get his name. He was blaming the drought in California and the cold winter we have been having on global warming. He also said (I kid you not), he said that we can expect either harsh or mild winters from here on in.
10 posted on 02/15/2014 6:31:25 PM PST by fhayek
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To: SeekAndFind

FUBO!!


11 posted on 02/15/2014 6:32:13 PM PST by Jim Robinson (Resistance to tyrants is obedience to God!!)
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To: SeekAndFind

hey! didn’t someone make a big top 40 hit regarding that it never rains in California?


12 posted on 02/15/2014 6:42:33 PM PST by Cruz_West_Paul2016
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To: fhayek
he said that we can expect either harsh or mild winters from here on in.

Yeah, one or the other.

Now that's really a wild-eyed reckless prediction...ain-it.

13 posted on 02/15/2014 6:42:54 PM PST by ROCKLOBSTER (Celebrate "Republicans Freed the Slaves" Month.)
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To: BenLurkin

“California is the nation’s most productive agricultural state, and is home to a $35 billion agricultural industry. Of the ten most productive agricultural counties in the United States, nine are in California, and the San Joaquin Valley is the single richest agricultural region in the world. California produces more than 400 commodities. It is the nation’s sole producer of a dozen crops, including almonds, artichokes, olives, raisins, and walnuts, and is the leading producer of five dozen more. The state employs 27 percent of the nation’s farm workers, and produces nearly half domestically grown fruits, nuts, and vegetables. Almost 22 percent of the nation’s milk and cream is produced in California, and the state is by far the nation’s largest producer of dairy products. “

http://www.epa.gov/region9/ag/ag-state.html


14 posted on 02/15/2014 6:47:41 PM PST by Lurkina.n.Learnin (This is not just stupid, we're talking Democrat stupid here.)
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To: SeekAndFind
Yep -- the water shortage for agriculture is purely man-made in terms of irrigation.

But what I'm seeing in California this year is different than I have ever seen in my lifetime, and I've lived here more than half a century (I've been five years old more than 11 times, if that tells you anything! ;^).

This is the first time in my lifetime, and as well in my mom's lifetime, and she's been here for 85 years, that we haven't seen green hills this time of year.

Spooky.

But it's not the first time it's been this dry, and it won't be the last.

15 posted on 02/15/2014 6:48:54 PM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: SeekAndFind

I wish I could find the famous photo of SOME farmers in the valley who stopped some local diversion...themselves..some years ago.


16 posted on 02/15/2014 6:49:08 PM PST by MeshugeMikey ("When you meet the unbelievers, strike at their necks..." -- Qur'an 47:4)
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To: SeekAndFind

By now it should be cristal clear that or ferral government is a wholly owned subsidiary of the ChiComs ,Mexican drug lords, the Saudis, and international bankers.

And the goal of this cabal is the utter destruction of America’s means of production, confiscation of her wealth, and finally the complete elimination of her people, in order to turn the USA back into a 3rd world colony, never again able to challenge a feual system which has dominated the majority of human history.


17 posted on 02/15/2014 6:51:33 PM PST by SecondAmendment (Restoring our Republic at 9.8357x10^8 FPS)
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To: driftdiver
Isn’t southern California a desert naturally?

It depends on how you define "desert."

I would say more arid, Mediterranean-like. Desert is Arizona, to me, and high desert is Lancaster, Edwards Air Force Base, flat, dry, wind-bitten, baren. Climate, soil, and topography a whole helluva lot different than urbanized and semi-urbanized Southern California, which I know well and know what it was like 50, even 100 years ago, from pictures, etc. Not desert. But people like to say it is, I think because it sounds so dramatic!

Now, Las Vegas. THAT is desert. That is a city carved out of a patch of desert. It's a city that exists because water is shipped to it.

18 posted on 02/15/2014 6:53:55 PM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Cruz_West_Paul2016
hey! didn’t someone make a big top 40 hit regarding that it never rains in California?

The actual title is : IT NEVER RAINS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA.


19 posted on 02/15/2014 6:59:27 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: fhayek

RE: He was blaming the drought in California and the cold winter we have been having on global warming

So, when it’s very hot, it’s global warming.

When it’s very cold, it’s also global warming.

Boy, this term explains everything so well, it really explains nothing.


20 posted on 02/15/2014 7:01:56 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Sounds like Russia to some extent. They were starving with permanent drought since 1920 into late 1990s importing all the grain they could.
Since 2009 or so they are a major exporter, for the first time since 1913.
Is it globull warming or what? /s


21 posted on 02/15/2014 7:04:50 PM PST by cunning_fish
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To: SeekAndFind

There’s nothing wrong with California ten million less foreign gullets wouldn’t fix.

What did they think was going to happen, allowing millions more people to move here in short order, that now need to drink and utilize water we didn’t have back ten to twenty years ago.

And now the Republican GOPe leaders are pumping the same dry well.


22 posted on 02/15/2014 7:10:44 PM PST by DoughtyOne (Immigration Reform is job NONE. It isn't even the leading issue with Hipanics. Enforce our laws.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Here is an email I recently sent a friend in Aptos, CA:

Dear Liberal Friend:

As this situation worsens I would like to remind you that the “uncaring” conservatives were the ones who wanted to conserve CA water.

In addition to liberal groups suing the state to let water from dams flow into the ocean, (google for example “delta smelt” which is NOT a native California species), they killed the Auburn Dam Project in the 70’s and 80’s which would have TRIPLED the amount of reserve water in CA.

Anyone in their right minds would be in favor of the project looking at historical rainfall patterns.

So as you walk into the bathroom and are confronted with toilets that need to be flushed, I would like you to think of the crap that REALLY needs to be flushed in California, which is liberal policies and politicians.

All the best...


23 posted on 02/15/2014 7:20:29 PM PST by ChinaGotTheGoodsOnClinton (Go Egypt on 0bama)
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To: SeekAndFind

When I hear about the things Progressives do, the thought “kill your parents and bemoan the fact that you are an orphan” comes to mind.


24 posted on 02/15/2014 7:39:27 PM PST by RetiredTexasVet (Anything regarding this administration ..... remember I told you so first!)
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To: SeekAndFind

"Never let a good crisis go to waste..."


25 posted on 02/15/2014 7:42:19 PM PST by logi_cal869
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To: SeekAndFind

signs all over the central volley have it right.... the bust bowl that congress created


26 posted on 02/15/2014 7:53:35 PM PST by Nifster
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To: Finny

Yeah, I’m stationed at Travis AFB. Been here since 2010. Really weird this year...


27 posted on 02/15/2014 8:40:06 PM PST by An American in Turkiye
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To: SeekAndFind
Victor Davis Hanson, A Tale of Two Droughts
28 posted on 02/15/2014 8:49:48 PM PST by TChad
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To: driftdiver
I have visited a friend in San Diego, and yes, southern California is considered a desert, due to its lack of rainfall. That's what determines drought, desert etc. Its annual rainfall is (if I remember correctly) about 10 inches a year.. One of the reasons they have canyon fires so often...she has been burned out by those but chose to rebuild in the same area. The side of a canyon. It only happened once is 2 decades...
29 posted on 02/15/2014 9:03:26 PM PST by goat granny (.)
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To: SeekAndFind
This is a kindergarten understanding of what is going on in the Central Valley. Here's what I had to say about this topic in 2009:

George Miller is foisting the setup for his globalist buddies in the real estate business to get cheap water for the cities they're going to build. This will work just like BART did in the Bay Area. You can bet that the first farmers to feel the heat will be those with a site for a potential insta-city near a station for the "maglev" (massive subsidy #2). The goal is a Central Valley that has a large population but grows no food, a chain of Sustained Developments, each with a transportation/utility jugular that is effectively a gun to the people's heads. Oh but they'll get lots of "Nature" all around them (aka "no man's land"). It'll be paradise! (cough!) All they need is customers. No problemo.

The key fact is that water is more valuable for development than it is for agriculture. As long as that is true the crooks in the "investment" business are going to tweak things against farming. They're "investing" in farming overseas in "places more appropriate for farming (see "comparative advantage" and "free trade"). So they get the trade agreements they want, push those annoying owners off their land, so that they come running to cities, including here, looking to be the customer base for their housing. That they'll subsidize exactly the same way they are doing now using your tax dollars to feed, clothe, educate, and medicate their brainwashed children up to speed, you know, until things are "fair." They'll make better slaves because they already know the score. Americans are too deluded with relic ideas of "freedom" to be quite as useful.

You really didn't think that Democrats like Pat and Jerry were going to let the "wrong people" make money did you? They got the farmers to pony up the cash for the construction of this massive investment subsidy, by teasing them into salivating at a profit in real estate. They got the farmers to pay for the infrastructure and let them hold the bag until the big boys saw the right time. They had to wait until they were finished building out the desert anyway. The recession plus the idiot voters wishing up a passenger train boondoggle presents exactly such an opportunity.

Smelt, smelt, oh no, the smelt are dying... uh, the farmers are still hanging on... Oh steelhead, salmon, oh the humanity!!! (they're more photogenic anyway.) So it goes. I'll bet whoever wrote that biological opinion will end up running a lab.

29 posted on 06/09/2009 7:27:54 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (Grovelnator Schwarzenkaiser, fashionable fascism one charade at a time.)
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At the time I forgot to mention Catellus and Richard Blum, and I didn't know about the way they use CalPERS to bankroll the game (and hold the bag if it goes bad), but the rest of it is playing out pretty much as predicted.
30 posted on 02/15/2014 9:35:44 PM PST by Carry_Okie (0-Care IS Medicaid; they'll pull a sheet over your head and take everything you own to pay for it.)
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To: An American in Turkiye

Isn’t Travis up by Sacramento?


31 posted on 02/15/2014 9:42:30 PM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: SeekAndFind; 11B40; A Balrog of Morgoth; A message; ACelt; Aeronaut; AFPhys; AlexW; alrea; ...
DOOMAGE!

Global Warming PING!

You have been pinged because of your interest in environmentalism, alarmist wackos, mainstream media doomsday hype, and other issues pertaining to global warming.

Freep-mail me to get on or off: Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to all note-worthy threads on global warming.

Girl Scouts Instruct Members in 'Girl-Relevant Environmental Thinking'

Global Warming and The Absurd Level of Lying

Dem: 'Climate denier' can't win in 2016

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Latest from Global Warming News

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32 posted on 02/15/2014 9:51:06 PM PST by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (Colorado: the Maryland of the Mountain West)
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To: goat granny; driftdiver
I have visited a friend in San Diego, and yes, southern California is considered a desert, due to its lack of rainfall.

Then Southern California is "desert" only in a most technical sense, and misleading. San Diego is downright tropical, not because of water shipped to it, but because of humidity and climate and more rain than in L.A., I'd wager. It might not be lush, but it would hardly be "desert" without a city there.

Vineyards and agriculture were pretty strong before shipped in water in Los Angeles and surrounding areas. Fountain Valley (in the heart of Orange County -- yes, "the O.C.") is called that because of underground springs that were there (still are), and a lot of produce was grown there before it became citified.

Consider it a "desert" if you want, but ... I've been to deserts. San Diego and L.A., even without the cities, sure looked like they must have been pretty nice and fruitful deserts!

33 posted on 02/15/2014 9:53:20 PM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Finny

Yes, Travis is in Fairfield, right between Sacramento and San Francisco. And while we’ve had a few days of rain, it’s not much, and not like the previous couple of years. The wife and I drove down to Disneyland last Monday snd spent a week there. Saw the dust bowl down south on I-5. Just sad. Saw lots of almond trees ripped out and waiting to be mulched. No water down there.


34 posted on 02/15/2014 10:11:07 PM PST by An American in Turkiye
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To: An American in Turkiye
And that is such a pisser about no water in the Valley. All that land should be, and could be (except for drought, but that's a different issue, really) irrigated. The San Joaquin Valley feeds people. It clothes people (or used to, when a lot of cotton was grown there, don't know if it still is). Agriculture is how we get the meat, dairy, and produce in our grocery stores.

Have you ever seen Mono Lake? I finally saw it for the first time last year. If I remember correctly, a lot of environmentalists are wailing because Mono Lake is that way because of water being diverted to irrigate crops.

Frankly, losing Mono Lake as the price of helping to nourish one of the richest and largest agricultural produce bowls in the world ... WOULD BE WORTH IT. Everything on this planet is temporary, and everything that happens on it is fleeting. We are along for the ride. Five hundred years in our scale is a nanosecond on the real geological scale.

Makes me sick to my stomach to see agriculture taking such a blow. Then again, a shocking number of them vote Democrat.

35 posted on 02/15/2014 10:25:13 PM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Finny

gee, I wonder if the reason for it is good irrigation coming from other parts of the state.


36 posted on 02/15/2014 10:27:12 PM PST by goat granny (.)
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To: goat granny
gee, I wonder if the reason for it is good irrigation coming from other parts of the state.

I don't. Know why?

Because I'm talking about what it was like before the irrigation.

37 posted on 02/15/2014 10:28:34 PM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: SeekAndFind

the problem is that the claims of the central valley farmers and their supporters are only HALF right

it’s true that certain “environmental” concerns are receiving 100% of what the state designated as their portion of water, and the central valley is getting maybe 40% of it’s designated allotment

HOWEVER, even if all water interests in the state got an equal % of their regular allotments, there would still be shortages, because there has been and continues to be drought, in terms of the amount of water California had gotten use to receiving and what it has been getting in recent years.

Yes, the drought is more severe in the southern part of the state - always dryer than the north in good or bad years, in terms of water - but, the state resevoirs are a gage on the drought and a majority are at some stage of drought status and many have been for a number of years.

California has experienced large scale multi-year drought conditions, moderate to severe - 1918-20, 23-26, 28-35, 47-50, 59-62, 76-77, 87-92, 2000-2002, 2007-2009; and in terms of precipitation 2013 was the driest on record. A majority of the state’s resevoirs are at some level of drught status.

Yes - the Liberal ideolgoues and environmental nazis have made the problem for farming worse than it needed to be under the present conditions.

My point is that correcting that will not create the water conditions the state, and the farmers have been used to.

Solutions like desalinization plants are what is needed, or their will never be enough water to satisfy all interests in California, particularly through the dry years. That kind of solution is needed in the southern part of state as well, because the watershed that feeds the Colorado River has not been delivering the kind of quantities that were abundent when the Hoover Dam was built. There is some concern that its hdroelectric generation capacity may be threatened, if drought conditions continue or become more severe.

California has water problems up and down the state.

The pols and ideolgoues have made matters worse for the farmers, worse than needed to be.

But, their actions are not creating the drought, they just make the drought that is worse for some of state’s water interests.


38 posted on 02/15/2014 11:23:27 PM PST by Wuli
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To: SeekAndFind

SoCal liberals cling bitterly to their seldom used pools as the nations food supply goes thirsty.

39 posted on 02/15/2014 11:42:07 PM PST by fella ("As it was before Noah so shall it be again,")
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To: Wuli

Corn is a HUGE user of water compared to other food crops. And is a REAL waste when used for ethanol fuel, so I did a quick search to see if California was stupid enough. Seems that they are, but the article also told of how they were trying to move away from corn for ethanol:

http://www.ewg.org/agmag/2013/09/california-needs-corn-ethanol-reform

Transitioning away from corn ethanol makes sense for California and the rest of the country. From 2008 to 2011, the mandate has contributed to plowing up more than 23 million acres of wetlands and grasslands – an area the size of Indiana – in order to grow crops, largely corn...

Likewise, the National Academy of Sciences found no evidence that corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emissions and may actually increase them, along with boosting air pollutants...

In California, where water shortages are common, it can take more than 3,500 liters of water to produce a single liter of ethanol, according to researchers at UC Berkeley....


40 posted on 02/16/2014 12:01:14 AM PST by 21twelve (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2185147/posts 2013 is 1933 REBORN)
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To: Finny

Good points. The water in the lake will come back. The farmland and the farmers might not, if run out of business due to lack of water.


41 posted on 02/16/2014 9:48:33 AM PST by FBD
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To: ChinaGotTheGoodsOnClinton

What was your friend’s response to this letter?


42 posted on 02/16/2014 9:50:19 AM PST by FBD
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To: SeekAndFind

There should be riots ever this. The solution is easy, short term, and has been done before.


43 posted on 02/17/2014 6:37:54 AM PST by alrea ( By progressive they mean costs.)
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To: Carry_Okie
they'll subsidize exactly the same way they are doing now using your tax dollars to feed, clothe, educate, and medicate their brainwashed children up to speed, you know, until things are "fair."

Makes more sense in 2014.

44 posted on 02/17/2014 6:42:46 AM PST by alrea ( By progressive they mean costs.)
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To: SeekAndFind

new water source in north san diego county

Instead of the high speed train we should be building 5-6 of these plants.

Here’s some info on desalinization

http://www.pacinst.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/desalination_report3.pdf

Carlsbad Cal is building a plant which is slated to open in 2016, 16 years after the proposal was approved by the city. Administrative hearings and court processes in which environmental groups got several bites of the apple trying to shoot it down.

It will suppjy up to 10% of the county’s water.

What happens to the salt?

The desalination plant typically uses three kilograms of seawater to produce 1 kilogram of fresh water. The extracted salt dissolves in the excess sea water used in the process to form so-called brine. The brine is returned to the sea where it is diluted again in its natural medium.

Can salt be recovered?

The usual desalination processes do not provide for such recovery. Whereas they concentrate seawater 1.5 times, recovery of salt would require seawater to be concentrated ten times. Under such conditions the first crystals would appear in the brine. This would require a lot of energy and cannot be justified on an economic standpoint. Today whenever a large surface area is available close to a sunny seashore, salt pans, which make use of solar energy, are still the best method of salt production.


45 posted on 02/17/2014 6:50:27 AM PST by morphing libertarian
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