Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Remember Obama Saying People With Pre-Existing Conditions Shouldn't Pay More? Yeah, Well...
Independent Journal Review ^ | February 15, 2014 | Mike Miller

Posted on 02/16/2014 8:59:13 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-2021-28 last
To: 2ndDivisionVet

Dang... that kenyan commie lied again... who would have thunk it?


21 posted on 02/17/2014 3:48:21 AM PST by LibLieSlayer (FROM MY COLD, DEAD HANDS! BETTER DEAD THAN RED!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Since (almost) everyone seems to agree that you should still be able to buy “insurance” against sickness even if you are already sick (which is not insurance at all, of course), we might as well nationalize and get it over with.


22 posted on 02/17/2014 3:50:32 AM PST by Jim Noble (When strong, avoid them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise. E)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: steve86

“There is an exceptions process for non-formulary medications based on medical need. The physician has to make a case and justify the use. Then it is covered like a brand name.”

In industry when you want to appear to be cooperating but you don’t want something to happen you kill it by doing “the slow roll.” (Also, “killing it with yes” or “Yessing it to death.”) One method is to create difficult paperwork that you have no intention of processing. There was an article on FR yesterday about doctors quitting private practice and going to work for hospitals because of their increased paperwork. A doctor is going to see many more patients under the ACA. Just the standard paperwork is now tremendous. A nurse once told me my doctor had stopped writing pain medicine prescriptions because the DEA made him write a letter with each one and provide patient records. So his patients were in constant pain. (Yes, there was probably a problem as he left town with no notice.) But the point I his patients suffered as a direct result of DEA required paperwork. So, how many doctors simply won’t even mention medicine that will require them to give up their own time to justify?


23 posted on 02/17/2014 3:52:50 AM PST by Gen.Blather
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: steve86
The physician has to make a case and justify the use

Yeah, sure.

As a sideline, I run a clinic for people going overseas.

Usually, their malaria meds are not covered, unless I "make a case and justify the use".

This process of "making the case" takes between 30 and 120 minutes depending on the insurer, the day of the week, and the time of day.

If I had to do this once every six months, it would be an imposition. Twenty times a week, it is an impossibility.

Of course, the insurers blame me.

24 posted on 02/17/2014 3:54:44 AM PST by Jim Noble (When strong, avoid them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise. E)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: babygene

You and many others will become medical tourists. You’ll probably go to India.


25 posted on 02/17/2014 3:57:03 AM PST by Gen.Blather
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
But didn’t Obama pledge — multiple times — to help those with pre-existing conditions, a: get covered, and, b: control their cost of healthcare? Here’s the reality, according to Dr. Daniel Kantor, who treats MS patients and others with neurological conditions:

Yes, and they even came up with a cute marketing slogan for it too - "job lock" - being locked into your job to keep the insurance. Pelosi mentioned it as recently as last week.

26 posted on 02/17/2014 4:55:19 AM PST by Cyclone59 (Where are we going, and what's with the handbasket?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Noble

I don’t doubt your experiences requesting exceptions but I know that in two recent cases in the family (Fosamax => Prolia for my elderly mother) and (Effexor => Effexor XR) for me, getting the exception was no big deal. The Prolia is $$$$ as you know. In my case the nurse made the phone call and sent the FAX and I suspect the same of my mom’s clinic.

Besides, I was trying to point out to people that a closed formulary isn’t really as closed as the article makes it out to be.


27 posted on 02/17/2014 12:07:34 PM PST by steve86 (Some things aren't really true but you wouldn't be half surprised if they were.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Gen.Blather

Sorry I missed your comment earlier. Yes, the barriers to opiate treatment are really formidable, especially in a state like mine (WA), where the legislature has been gung-ho on this.

But I don’t see where Obamacare (”exchange”) policies are much different from older policies with respect to formulary exceptions.


28 posted on 02/17/2014 12:24:15 PM PST by steve86 (Some things aren't really true but you wouldn't be half surprised if they were.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-2021-28 last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson