Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Putin's War in Crimea Could Soon Spread to Eastern Ukraine and nobody can stop him
The New Republic ^ | March 1, 2014 | Julia Ioffe

Posted on 03/01/2014 9:12:13 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet

Vladimir Putin has asked the Federation Council—the upper chamber of Russia's dummy parliament—to authorize the use of force not just in Crimea, but "on Ukraine's territory until the socio-political situation is normalized." And though American spies and the Washington Post categorically ruled this out just days ago, this was not entirely unexpected. The situation is changing rapidly, but here are some initial thoughts.

Why is Putin doing this? Because he can. That's it, that's all you need to know. The situation in Kiev—in which people representing one half of the country (the Ukrainian-speaking west) took power to some extent at the expense of the Russian-speaking east—created the perfect opportunity for Moscow to divide and conquer. As soon as the revolution in Kiev happened, there was an unhappy rumbling in the Crimea, which has a large Russian population and is home to the Russian Black Sea Fleet. It was a small rumbling, but just big enough for Russia to exploit. And when such an opportunity presents itself, one would be foolish not to take it, especially if one's name is Vladimir Putin.

We didn't think Putin would do this. Why, exactly? This has often puzzled me about Western analysis of Russia. It is often predicated on wholly Western logic: surely, Russia won't invade [Georgia, Ukraine, whoever's next] because war is costly and the Russian economy isn't doing well and surely Putin doesn't want another hit to an already weak ruble; because Russia doesn't need to conquer Crimea if Crimea is going to secede on its own; Russia will not want to risk the geopolitical isolation, and "what's really in it for Russia?"—stop. Russia, or, more accurately, Putin, sees the world according to his own logic, and the logic goes like this: it is better to be feared than loved, it is better to be overly strong than to risk appearing weak, and Russia was, is, and will be an empire with an eternal appetite for expansion. And it will gather whatever spurious reasons it needs to insulate itself territorially from what it still perceives to be a large and growing NATO threat. Trying to harness Russia with our own logic just makes us miss Putin's next steps.

Pessimism always wins. One of the reasons I left my correspondent's post in Moscow was because Russia, despite all the foam on the water, is ultimately a very boring place. Unfortunately, all you really need to do to seem clairvoyant about the place is to be an utter pessimist. Will Vladimir Putin allow the ostensibly liberal Dmitry Medvedev to have a second term? Not a chance. There are protests in the streets of Moscow. Will Putin crackdown? Yup. There's rumbling in the Crimea, will Putin take advantage and take the Crimean peninsula? You betcha. And you know why being a pessimist is the best way to predict outcomes in Russia? Because Putin and those around him are, fundamentally, terminal pessimists. They truly believe that there is an American conspiracy afoot to topple Putin, that Russian liberals are traitors corrupted by and loyal to the West, they truly believe that, should free and fair elections be held in Russia, their countrymen would elect bloodthirsty fascists, rather than democratic liberals. To a large extent, Putin really believes that he is the one man standing between Russia and the yawning void. Putin's Kremlin is dark and scary, and, ultimately, very boring.

Remember the U.N.? Russia loves the U.N. Anytime the U.S. or Europe want to do anything on the world stage, Russia pipes up, demanding the issue be taken to the U.N. for the inevitable Russian veto. As Steven Lee Meyers, Moscow correspondent for the New York Times, pointed out, Russia does not seem to even remember that the institution exists today. Ditto for all that talk of "political solutions" and "diplomatic solutions" and "dialogue" we heard about in Syria. In other words, what we are seeing today—Russia's unilateral declaration of war—is the clearest statement yet of Russia's actual position: Putin empathizes with Bashar al-Assad as a fellow leader holding his country back from the brink and doing the dirty work that needs to be done to accomplish that, and the U.N. is just a convenient mechanism for keeping nay-sayers with large armies at bay.

As I wrote earlier this month, Russia, like the U.S., projects its own mindset onto the rest of the world. So when you hear Putin and his foreign minister Sergei Lavrov and the talking heads on Russia Today crowing about American cynicism and machinations, well, keep in mind whom they're really talking about.

.

Speaking of America. Today's meeting of the Federation Council was an incredible sight to behold. Man after Soviet-looking man mounted the podium to deliver a short diatribe against...you name it. Against Ukrainian fascism, against Swedes, and, most of all, against America. One would think that it wasn't the illegitimate government in Kiev occupying Russian Crimea—which, lordy lord, if we're going to get ethnic, let's recall who originally lived there—but the 82nd Airborne. The vice speaker of the Council even demanded recalling the Russian ambassador to Washington. America was amazingly, fantastically behind events in Kiev and proved utterly inept at influencing them, and yet none of that seemed to matter. America, the old foe, was everywhere, its fat capitalist fingers in every Slavic pie. Watching the Federation Council, where few of the speakers seemed to be under the age of 60, I couldn't escape the feeling that this was an opportunity for Russia not just to take back some land it's long considered its rightful own, but to settle all scores and to tie up all loose ends. You know, while they're at it.

Double standards. This is another howl you often hear rending the skies over Moscow: Western double standards. But let's get real for a second. We've spoken already about the U.N., but what about the holy Russian mantra of non-interference in a nation's internal affairs? When it comes to Syria, to take a most recent example, the fight between Assad and the rebels is something only the Syrians can sort out. Ditto every other country in the world—unless it's in Russia's backyard, where Russia still experiences phantom limb syndrome. The internal issues of former Soviet republics, you see, are not truly internal issues of sovereign nations. This is because, by Stalin's very conscious design and very deliberate border drawing and population movement, most former Soviet republics are ethnic hodgepodges. So Ukraine has a sizable Russian population. Ditto Estonia, ditto Georgia, ditto Kazakhstan. And, according to Putin's unspoken doctrine, anywhere Russian citizens are determined to be at risk, Mother Moscow can intercede with force on their behalf.

.

In other, blunter words, Russian ethnicity and citizenship trump national sovereignty. At the very least, they provide a convenient pretext for territorial expansion, as they did in South Ossetia and Abkhazia, where Russia was also ostensibly protecting Russian citizens—also newly minted for the occasion. Just this week, for instance, Russia introduced a law to make it easier for Ukrainians to get Russian citizenship—you know, to give Russia someone to protect.

Russia manufactured this crisis to create a pretext for a land-grab. There are now protests swinging Russian flags and hailing Russia's glory not just in Crimea but all over the Russian-speaking east of Ukraine. I was just in Donetsk, Yanukovich's hometown, on Monday. It was calm, calmer than calm. There were a couple dozen people guarding the Lenin statue in the center of the city from vandals, but that was it. A muckety-muck in the city's administration told me, "If they send new people in to replace us, we'll leave peacefully, we won't try to hang on." The same was the case in Simferopol, in Crimea. And then, out of nowhere, men with unmarked uniforms were taking over government buildings and airports, and huge demonstrations were pumping on town squares all over the regions. The Kremlin often refers to "a well-organized informational war" when their enemies broadcast something they don't like on repeat. And now, looking at the alarmist, blanket coverage on Russian television—now all loyal to the Kremlin—about fascists and radicals staging a coup in Kiev, it's hard to think of a better term. This was indeed a well-organized informational war.

Neither America nor NATO can stop this. They've shown they won't in Georgia, because nobody wants to start a war with nuclear-armed Russia, and rightly so. So while Washington and Brussels huff and puff about lines and sovereignty and diplomacy, Russia will do what it needs to do and there's not a thing we can do about it.

Russia's next target is eastern Ukraine. Because pessimism conquers all, don't bet that Putin is going to stop once he wrests Crimea from Kiev's orbit. Eastern, Russian-speaking Ukraine—and all its heavy industry—is looking pretty good right now. And if you're thinking "Why would Putin take eastern Ukraine?," well, you haven't been reading very carefully.


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Russia
KEYWORDS: crimea; energy; gas; obama; putin; russia; ukraine; viktoryanukovich; war; yuliatymoshenko
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-60 next last

1 posted on 03/01/2014 9:12:14 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

What war?


2 posted on 03/01/2014 9:12:52 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

I wonder what other former eastern-bloc countries that Putin might be desiring a piece of???


3 posted on 03/01/2014 9:14:08 PM PST by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Meanwhile, Obama and Reggie are cuddling at a dance recital.


4 posted on 03/01/2014 9:14:43 PM PST by Viennacon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

When one country invades a section of another, I think you’ve got a war. Adolf Hitler was lucky with the Österreich Anschluss, but that is unusual.


5 posted on 03/01/2014 9:15:42 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet (I will raise $2M for Sarah Palin's next run, what will you do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Isn’t Crimera in east Ukraine?


6 posted on 03/01/2014 9:16:29 PM PST by stuck_in_new_orleans
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

“What war?”

You took the words right out of my mouth.

He’s having an easier time than when Hitler waltzed into Vienna.


7 posted on 03/01/2014 9:18:16 PM PST by aquila48
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
Putin has the Russian Army behind him...and he IS unstoppable.
Just an opinion.
8 posted on 03/01/2014 9:19:58 PM PST by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL
I wonder what other former eastern-bloc countries that Putin might be desiring a piece of???

PERHAPS, whatever takes his fancy.

9 posted on 03/01/2014 9:20:41 PM PST by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

What is the Russian word for Anschluss?


10 posted on 03/01/2014 9:21:39 PM PST by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Eastern Ukraine is already on Putin’s side... no need for war other than to tell western Ukraine to buzz off and go to EU on their own.


11 posted on 03/01/2014 9:22:34 PM PST by Cementjungle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

exactly....


12 posted on 03/01/2014 9:23:03 PM PST by Nifster
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Where are the human shields?


13 posted on 03/01/2014 9:24:04 PM PST by Steely Tom (How do you feel about robbing Peter's robot?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin
It is just an "uncontested arrival" of "undocumented immigrants".

Nothing to see here folks. Move along.

14 posted on 03/01/2014 9:24:15 PM PST by Moorings
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

I don’t understand why anyone is surprised. If I were Putin, I’d do the same thing: send in military to provide security to national assets that are protected by treaty amid unrest and tensions along the border. I wish my gd government did the same, but I digress. And as mentioned before, that’s their warm water port and lifeline. It’s a no-brainer. Now is the time to stop hyperventilating over every development, and watch the major chess pieces.


15 posted on 03/01/2014 9:26:13 PM PST by SpaceBar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL
"I wonder what other former eastern-bloc countries that Putin might be desiring a piece of???"

The Ukraine would be prize enough. It has both industry and a vast agricultural economy.
16 posted on 03/01/2014 9:26:18 PM PST by Steve_Seattle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

When are liberals going to step-aside and let a man or an iron lady like Margaret Thatcher run this country? Time to step off, you dope smoking liberals! We need a man with a pair or leader who does not have a pair but acts like she does. If we could reincarnate Reagan or Thatcher right now, we would have most of these problems solved in short order.


17 posted on 03/01/2014 9:26:41 PM PST by 3Fingas (Sons and Daughters for Freedom and Rededication to the Principles of the U.S. Constitution)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 3Fingas

First the sheeple would have to be too distracted to vote


18 posted on 03/01/2014 9:28:19 PM PST by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

This reminds me of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus. How was that finally resolved?


19 posted on 03/01/2014 9:30:36 PM PST by Cowboy Bob (They are called "Liberals" because the word "parasite" was already taken.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

Well, there’s one good thing about all the pot ballot initiatives. Liberals will be stoned to register and vote. There’s an effective distraction.


20 posted on 03/01/2014 9:31:13 PM PST by 3Fingas (Sons and Daughters for Freedom and Rededication to the Principles of the U.S. Constitution)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: 3Fingas

21 posted on 03/01/2014 9:33:02 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet (I will raise $2M for Sarah Palin's next run, what will you do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

That would be wonderful, 2ndDivisonVet. But, you know the Republicans are going to nominate some rino like Jeb Bush or Paul Ryan. Scott Walker might be the best candidate they will tolerate. My favorites Allan West and Olly North will never be given a chance or will never run.


22 posted on 03/01/2014 9:38:11 PM PST by 3Fingas (Sons and Daughters for Freedom and Rededication to the Principles of the U.S. Constitution)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

The flower of Russian youth is buried in Crimea and Ukraine. The Russians sacrificed enormously to defeat the Germans. It was not wise to dance on their graves. Russian nationalists were always aghast that Crimea was not formally a part of Russia. Russia will incorporate Crimea into Russia the way the Chinese incorporated Tibet. The West cannot stop them. However if Putin overplays his hand and seizes large amounts of Eastern Ukraine, it would badly frighten the Germans and the economic consequences would be punishing.


23 posted on 03/01/2014 9:39:36 PM PST by allendale
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cloudmountain

Nobody’s unstoppable. The current POTUS is easily resettable and transmittable, though, never mind utterly apathetic.


24 posted on 03/01/2014 9:39:58 PM PST by Olog-hai
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: cloudmountain
...and he IS unstoppable

BS! But Obozo will never commit troops to stop him. But the US military "could". But Russia does have Nukes, and we certainly do, unless Obozo silently killed them.

25 posted on 03/01/2014 9:39:59 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Texas is not where you were born, but a Free State of Heart, Mind & Attitude!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Lots of red in that poster, and a star.


26 posted on 03/01/2014 9:40:51 PM PST by Olog-hai
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

I didn’t come up with it. If you can find me a better one on the same subject (I’ve looked) I’ll be glad to use it, of course.


27 posted on 03/01/2014 9:42:24 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet (I will raise $2M for Sarah Palin's next run, what will you do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: SpaceBar

Exactly the way I see it. Putin’s just taking advantage and doing what any strong leader would do, securing his nation’s interests. And he has an open liscense to do so, thanks to a laughably impotent America, saddled with pathetic, weak, and morally degenerate leadership.


28 posted on 03/01/2014 9:43:25 PM PST by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: greene66

Putin is settling a question that should have been settled years ago at the negotiating table.


29 posted on 03/01/2014 9:44:46 PM PST by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: allendale
"However if Putin overplays his hand and seizes large amounts of Eastern Ukraine, it would badly frighten the Germans and the economic consequences would be punishing."

I think he can get away with it if he limits himself to the pro-Russian eastern half.
30 posted on 03/01/2014 9:44:49 PM PST by Steve_Seattle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Texas Fossil
BS! But Obozo will never commit troops to stop him. But the US military "could". But Russia does have Nukes, and we certainly do, unless Obozo silently killed them.

I agree that he is "STOPPABLE"--but NOT, I think with the coward fool current POTUS.

Do YOU have confidence and faith in Obama? I don't. PUTIN will have a green light until Obama gets off the pot, so to speak. Obama is the Commander-in-Chief of the military. If he WON'T stop Putin, then Putin wins. The military will not act on its own.

I hope Obama LISTENS to the people and his military.

31 posted on 03/01/2014 9:48:06 PM PST by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: cloudmountain

If there had been the slightest indication that Obama was a President not to be trifled with, this would not have happened.


32 posted on 03/01/2014 9:49:34 PM PST by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

I glanced at the headlines and sub-headlines on the MSNBC banner web page and my local newspaper web page , and I saw no protest of Putin’s actions by the UN, European leaders, or “world opinion.” Obama’s tepid warning was about it. Can you imagine the world outcry if the US had invaded northern Mexico to quash uprisings caused by drug overlords or some such thing?


33 posted on 03/01/2014 9:51:09 PM PST by Steve_Seattle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL
If there had been the slightest indication that Obama was a President not to be trifled with, this would not have happened.

MAN, did you hit the nail on the head!!

34 posted on 03/01/2014 9:58:44 PM PST by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Steve_Seattle

You don’t even need to create a hypothetical invasion of Mexico since there are regions along the border that lie within US territory that are no-mans-lands controlled by drug cartels.


35 posted on 03/01/2014 10:01:12 PM PST by SpaceBar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

This article is an attempt by the New Republic to create a “we can’t stop this” meme as a cover for Obama’s incompetence. All the rest is window dressing.


36 posted on 03/01/2014 10:02:32 PM PST by Kennard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai
Nobody’s unstoppable. The current POTUS is easily resettable and transmittable, though, never mind utterly apathetic.

An "easily resettable and transmittable, though, never mind utterly apathetic" POTUS makes Putin unstoppable.

WHERE, O WHERE is a General George Smith Patton, Jr. when we need one?!?!

37 posted on 03/01/2014 10:02:48 PM PST by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: cloudmountain

A more full thought:

If there had been the slightest indication that Obama was a President not to be trifled with, this would not have happened. It would have made the Russians think long and hard about acting out in such a blatant manner. Instead we have a weak, pansy POTUS pretender who is probably jealous of this invasion and partition of another country.

Weakness invites violence.


38 posted on 03/01/2014 10:08:08 PM PST by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
I was just in Donetsk, Yanukovich's hometown, on Monday. It was calm, calmer than calm. There were a couple dozen people guarding the Lenin statue in the center of the city from vandals, but that was it. A muckety-muck in the city's administration told me, "If they send new people in to replace us, we'll leave peacefully, we won't try to hang on." The same was the case in Simferopol, in Crimea. And then, out of nowhere, men with unmarked uniforms were taking over government buildings and airports, and huge demonstrations were pumping on town squares all over the regions.

As was reported in the Ukrainian media, the clown who hoisted a Russian flag in Kharkiv is a Russian from Moscow. http://m.vk.com/venoru
I's almost, but not quite, the opposite of the protests in Kyiv.

In Crimea, it's even more ridiculous. At the beginning if the week, leader of Crimea, Mogilev, was telling that it's all mostly quiet, no discussions of separating. Next, a group of Russian soldiers storms the parliament and government buildings, new Crimean leader is selected, practically a nobody with a criminal past and a 5% share in the Crimean parliament.

39 posted on 03/01/2014 10:18:49 PM PST by Ivan Mazepa
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FReepers; Patriots; FRiends





PLEASE Make YOUR Donation Tonight.
It's Time to Get This One Done!

40 posted on 03/01/2014 10:23:11 PM PST by onyx (Please Support Free Republic - Donate Monthly! If you want on Sarah Palin's Ping List, Let Me know!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

Being an overseas vet of WWII and with my only brother killed on Okinawa I probably see things differently than many other people. As such if the USA has no compelling self interest in the Ukraine/Russia we should be ready to protect our interests with as great a force as we can muster but not use such assets unless needed for our own interests. I see no inherent USA interest in what goes on with Russia and Ukraine. That western Europe financial interests cannot get/take from Russia oil and gas deposits or set up their own lines through the contested areas is not compelling enough for loss one USA life,overtly or covertly.


41 posted on 03/01/2014 10:45:58 PM PST by noinfringers2 ( /*)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: noinfringers2

I have not advocated the US send one soldier to Ukraine.


42 posted on 03/01/2014 10:46:59 PM PST by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: allendale

“However if Putin overplays his hand and seizes large amounts of Eastern Ukraine, it would badly frighten the Germans and the economic consequences would be punishing.”

If Germany gets feisty, doesn’t Russia just turn off the natural gas?


43 posted on 03/01/2014 11:09:55 PM PST by ModelBreaker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: noinfringers2

“Being an overseas vet of WWII and with my only brother killed on Okinawa I probably see things differently than many other people. As such if the USA has no compelling self interest in the Ukraine/Russia we should be ready to protect our interests with as great a force as we can muster but not use such assets unless needed for our own interests. I see no inherent USA interest in what goes on with Russia and Ukraine. That western Europe financial interests cannot get/take from Russia oil and gas deposits or set up their own lines through the contested areas is not compelling enough for loss one USA life,overtly or covertly.”

Yes.


44 posted on 03/01/2014 11:11:15 PM PST by ModelBreaker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin; aquila48; 2ndDivisionVet; SpaceBar; Steve_Seattle

That's what I was thinking...

But there is this, dated March 2 Russian armed forces seize Crimea as Putin threatens wider military invasion of Ukraine including what we could guess comes next, as outlined;

Members of the Russian Federation Council said that their nation's troops are needed to protect the safety of millions of ethnic Russians in Ukraine and that the soldiers should stay until "the constitutional order is restored in Ukraine," which hints at a possible Russian attempt to return to power Viktor Yanukovych, ousted as Ukraine's president on Feb. 22, or install another Kremlin-friendly leader.

It's been so far a limited occupation, limited to some forces in the Crimea, with a fig leaf covering of approval by the Crimean region's political head --- with Moscow disavowing legitimacy in Kiev presently, to make up for lack of invite from those in Kiev. Now the Russians seem to be threatening settling the matter firsthand -- with their own hands. (ok, while they're busy there we can invade Mexico, draft it's young men into an army firmly under U.S. control, then go take out the trash in Venezuela, eh? jez kidding...)

Those in Kiev need to get their ducks in a row as to charges of corruption, including specifically Yanukovych family placements within government department positions, along with his and his mob's pressuring of judges. If a few of those judges would come forward, it could be yet more dynamite to demand extradition of Yanukovych, rather than some Kremlin-backed heroic return. Frog march time, line the charges up carefully, but don't tip one's hand as to the most sure and deadliest and solid of allegations against Yanukovych until the last possible micro second. Crucify the (rich as Croesus) criminal bum. Throw him under the jail. After a fair trial, of course. ;^')

But Russia has other outcomes in mind. This looks like it's could get very nasty, with once again it being a heart-breaking things of evil warfare, to have been born in Ukraine. Will those people ever get a real break?

Kremlin minded backers are being fed the lies that those who oppose this [expletive deleted] Yanukovych, are Fascists. Uh-huh. yeah right. The Russians are lying sacks of "it" --- but they believe their own stinking piles(!) which is what makes them dangerous.

Here's some more on Yanukovych [below].

Yanukovych Leaks sheds light on Ukraine’s high-living ex-leader

Ukrainian journalists are going through thousands of papers, some of them partly burned, others fished out of a lake.

Some reports say they include plans for the use of even deadlier force than was unleashed on protesters last week. Yet most of the documents had to do with spending.

Journalist Oleksandr Akymenko said: “The documents are very valuable. They could help prove corruption schemes used by Yanukovych personally, his team and his inner circle. They contain lots of data linked to various companies close to the residence and to him.”

Ukraine: Corruption Doesn’t Capture It
First paragraph from link
Since it became an independent state 23 years ago, Ukraine has been looted by its structure of government at all levels and those close to it. The word “corruption” is not adequate to describe present-day Ukraine, and in fact, distorts reality. Western listeners, often aware of corruption in their own countries, and certainly it exists everywhere else, shrug their shoulders and remain unimpressed. But what has taken place in Ukraine all these years, and accelerated rapidly under the current government, goes far beyond corruption. It is a policy of looting the country, transformed over the last several years into systematic and institutionalized extortion that reached all the way down into society, after not much was left to be stolen at the top.

Further down in the same article;

To understand what led to the current protests in Ukraine, it helps to rewind the tape of history and to start with perhaps the most “politically incorrect” question for the West: how privatization took place in Ukraine (as well as in the other post-Soviet states) in the early 1990s and what role international institutions and Western experts played in it. I believe that, in its rush to shatter the existing centrally planned economy, to push free market reforms, and to make irrevocable the departure from socialism, the West made a fundamental misjudgment. It acted as if democratic societies can be built starting with economic changes even when institutional and governmental reforms are lacking.

The post-Soviet countries received a massive impetus from the West for the economic changes and reallocation of property rights reflected in privatization while they lacked the traditions and habits of accountable, transparent governance or any experience with grassroots democracy. In these conditions, privatization meant that state assets and natural resources landed firmly in the hands of those close to power, leaving the rest of the country in both financial and moral turmoil.

All that accelerated during the Yanukovych presidency, and was extended all the way down through the society. I was told in one government ministry that in each department, employees were forced to contribute part of his or her monthly salary, the money flowing up through the pyramid to those on top. This became generalized through government institutions. Any small business owner in Ukraine who hasn’t lost their company outright to physical threats or shady financial maneuvers ratified by corrupt courts, knows the necessity of paying large bribes to government officials just to keep the doors open.

From June 8, 2012 Yanukovych, the luxury residence and the money trail that leads to London

April 9, 2012 In Ukraine, scales of justice often imbalanced

45 posted on 03/01/2014 11:16:04 PM PST by BlueDragon (Where there is no vision, the people perish: but he that keepeth the law, happy is he.Proverbs 29:18)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

well it was Ottoman before the Russians took it in 1783.


46 posted on 03/02/2014 12:00:22 AM PST by RitchieAprile
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

Ukraine has always been the most significant economic and strategic possession of Russia. Putin is a 20th century person. Russia for centuries has desired buffer zones to protect against invasion from Western Europe

Russia’s real problem will be China but Putin doesn’t see it that way

I am afraid all of Ukraine will soon be lost


47 posted on 03/02/2014 2:50:59 AM PST by Jimmy Valentine (DemocRATS - when they speak, they lie; when they are silent, they are stealing the American Dream)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
We didn't think Putin would do this. Why, exactly? This has often puzzled me about Western analysis of Russia.

Because with "The Won" in the WH, the whole world would love us and respect us and be nice to us and be nice to each other and the White Christians would be eradicated and the world would be a really really nice place so "The Won" could sit on his golden and bejeweled throne and wield his vibrating scepter forever after?

48 posted on 03/02/2014 5:25:35 AM PST by trebb (Where in the the hell has my country gone?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cloudmountain

Obama listens to nobody in the US except possibley ValJar and George Soros.

And NO he will not commit troops anywhere to oppose an enemy of the US. And all the enemies of the US know this. That is why this is so bad.

But, Putin and the Russian Army are not unstoppable.

But Obama will never stop him. Or allow anyone to stop him. He has already told Putin this.


49 posted on 03/02/2014 5:38:45 AM PST by Texas Fossil (Texas is not where you were born, but a Free State of Heart, Mind & Attitude!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Texas Fossil
Obama listens to nobody in the US except possibley ValJar and George Soros.
Agreed.

And NO he will not commit troops anywhere to oppose an enemy of the US. And all the enemies of the US know this. That is why this is so bad.
Agreed,

But, Putin and the Russian Army are not unstoppable.
Agreed. EVERYone is stoppable. One needs only a "bigger stick."

But Obama will never stop him. Or allow anyone to stop him. He has already told Putin this.
So, WHO will stop him? You've got all the answers but the BIG one. WHO will stop him??
Putin IS unstoppable if WE don't stop him. Don't you GET it? You expect WHOM to stop him?
**You've given me good logic so far, but NOW answer the question if you can. WHO WILL STOP HIM?

Maybe we have to wait for a GOP president who has some cajones. Unfortunately it may be too late for Ukraine.

50 posted on 03/02/2014 6:04:34 AM PST by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-60 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson