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Louisiana's Longest-Serving Death Row Prisoner Walks Free After 30 Years
CNN ^ | Wed March 12, 2014 | Dana Ford

Posted on 03/12/2014 6:27:02 PM PDT by nickcarraway

There are many ways to measure 30 years, but for Glenn Ford, the yardstick is simple.

"My sons -- when I left -- was babies. Now they grown men with babies," he said, speaking as a free man for the first time in nearly three decades.

Ford, Louisiana's longest-serving death row prisoner, walked free Tuesday after spending nearly 30 years behind bars for a murder he did not commit.

"My mind's going all kinds of directions, but it feels good," Ford, 64, told reporters outside the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, according to CNN affiliate WAFB.

(Excerpt) Read more at cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Extended News; US: Louisiana
KEYWORDS: amnestyinternational; cnn; deathpenalty; louisiana; playtheracecard

1 posted on 03/12/2014 6:27:02 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

Glenn Ford
2 posted on 03/12/2014 6:27:46 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

If they ever do a remake of Blackboard Jungle, I hope he gets a part. It would be quite a comeback.


3 posted on 03/12/2014 6:30:59 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: nickcarraway

Put the prosecutor on death row. I hate the rules of evidence for capital cases.


4 posted on 03/12/2014 6:36:15 PM PDT by Salvavida (The restoration of the U.S.A. starts with filling the pews at every Bible-believing church.)
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To: ClearCase_guy

We see far too many cases of prosecutorial and police misconduct. Find the easiest target and get a conviction.

I should know as I worked for several years in a prosecutors office as an investigator.


5 posted on 03/12/2014 6:36:46 PM PDT by rstrahan
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To: nickcarraway

One of the reasons I turned against the death penalty. I’m sorry that it took 30 years to clear him but it’s still better than the alternative.


6 posted on 03/12/2014 6:36:54 PM PDT by Incorrigible (If I lead, follow me; If I pause, push me; If I retreat, kill me.)
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To: nickcarraway
A different Glenn Ford I would suspect :-)

I wonder if they caught the real killer?

7 posted on 03/12/2014 6:41:44 PM PDT by Mark17 (Chicago Blackhawks: Stanley Cup champions 2010, 2013. Vietnam Vet 70-71 Msgt US Air Force, retired)
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To: Incorrigible
The fault is not with the death penalty, but with the people empowered to enact the "justice" system.
8 posted on 03/12/2014 6:46:14 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: Incorrigible
One of the reasons I turned against the death penalty. I’m sorry that it took 30 years to clear him but it’s still better than the alternative.

Same here. I' still be for the death penalty if there were no corrupt prosecutors or law enforcement officers. The problem is there are way too many of them an virtually nothing happens to them when caught because they have so much dirt on the others. Kind of an unspoken mutual extortion society.

9 posted on 03/12/2014 6:53:22 PM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: rstrahan

Hey! Hi, my sister works as an
investigator to this day. (Not on
this case, but, of course, she was
ecstatic to have this outcome.)

If the man is innocent, I am thrilled
to have justice done-—a just outcome!


10 posted on 03/12/2014 6:58:40 PM PDT by krunkygirl (force multiplier in effect...)
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To: SeaHawkFan
The problem is there are way too many of them an virtually nothing happens to them when caught because they have so much dirt on the others.

Yup, that's the problem, but then, why punish any crime because the perp might be falsely accused?

11 posted on 03/12/2014 7:21:33 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (ObamaCare is Medicaid: They'll pull a sheet over your head and send you the bill.)
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To: nickcarraway
Absolutely no details about the facts. I'm not about to take CNN's word on this one.

Too many of these "exonerations" are the results of legal shenannigans .

Had a case here a while back where a killer was given a new trial on a technicality. After 25 yrs one witness, victim's wife had died, another witness had dementia and blood evidence was lost.

Prosecutor decided not to retry. naacp paraded the guy around as a victim.

That being said, if someone is wrongly convicted by prosecutorial misconduct those responsible should go to jail for a long time. I would also like to see them held financially responsible rather than the taxpayer.

12 posted on 03/12/2014 7:22:03 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux)
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To: Salvavida
Put the prosecutor on death row. I hate the rules of evidence for capital cases.

Notice they never mention who the prosecutor was.

13 posted on 03/12/2014 7:22:45 PM PDT by aimhigh ( Self defense - a human right.)
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To: Salvavida

Exactly! I had an employee convicted and sentenced to 7 years probated. He’s in his 4th year of a horrible experience. Now, he wishes he had just gone to prison because he would have been out in about 18 months.

Worst of all, most of the past 4 years, he has not been able to see his two young sons even though they are in town.

The courts are horribly incompetent and legislatures and county probation people are bureaucratic vacuous naughts.

The judge in his case was very inexperienced and she made horrible rulings. His own lawyers were disloyal to him and sat on exculpatory evidence. There was no interest by the prosecutor in the truth. The incident itself was incredibly minor. After reading the transcript, I just said to myself OMG, if his life was at stake they would have killed him and would not have given a damn. And, oh by the way, the cops sat on the stand and told bald face factual lies and got away with it.

Based upon his experience as a very poor defendant, and after 65 years on the planet being very pro death penalty, I no longer support it in MOST cases.

Basically, absent a video tape of the crime, OR NOT one scintilla of doubt, I’m against it. Juries are incompetent too. They mostly are awed by the judges and lawyers and can be convinced that God is in the parking lot.

I think determining the truth by 12 citizens in an incompetent give a damn courtroom with about 6 lawyers on all sides that don’t give a damn either has, in this society, become an impossible task. We can no longer govern ourselves and we are, as a society, incompetent to put people to death.


14 posted on 03/12/2014 7:23:14 PM PDT by Cen-Tejas (it's the debt bomb stupid!)
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To: nickcarraway

Where does this poor guy go to get his life back. A third to a half of it gone!


15 posted on 03/12/2014 7:24:09 PM PDT by Flick Lives ("I can't believe it's not Fascism!")
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To: nickcarraway
walked free Tuesday after spending nearly 30 years behind bars for a murder he did not commit.

Looking sharp Louisiana...

16 posted on 03/12/2014 7:26:44 PM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: Flick Lives

Dunno (sometimes state legislatures will pass special relief bills) but you can bet that for as long as he does still live, he’s going to be making the circuits earning beaucoup $$ doing nothing harder than talking about it all.


17 posted on 03/12/2014 7:28:06 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: nickcarraway; a fool in paradise

The former inmate is reported to have taken the 3:10 train to Yuma.


18 posted on 03/12/2014 7:29:00 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious! We reserve the right to serve refuse to anyone!)
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To: Eagles6
Here's more details about the case.

Freedom After 30 Years on Death Row
19 posted on 03/12/2014 7:35:10 PM PDT by Girlene (Hey, NSA!)
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To: nickcarraway

It is harder everyday to support Death Penalty. Too much corruption within the legal system and police force. I still kinda support it, but definitely don’t blame states that get rid of it.


20 posted on 03/12/2014 7:40:51 PM PDT by napscoordinator ( Santorum-Bachmann 2016 for the future of the country!)
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To: nickcarraway

It’s not like he lost his important years, just the 30 years between the time he was 34 and 64.


21 posted on 03/12/2014 7:45:38 PM PDT by Oliviaforever
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To: Cen-Tejas

I used to be very pro-death penalty. I now have zero faith in the legal system after years of stories involving innocent death row people, and frustrating stories like yours. Just one more rotting part of our nations corpse.


22 posted on 03/12/2014 8:03:35 PM PDT by catbertz
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To: Cen-Tejas

Maybe if everybody did believe God was in the parking lot they’d be more careful about not putting on circuses in court rooms. Good grief cubed.


23 posted on 03/12/2014 8:07:39 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: nickcarraway

I hope the guy gets a big check quick enough to enjoy it for a few years.


24 posted on 03/12/2014 8:15:35 PM PDT by Mike Darancette (Do The Math)
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To: napscoordinator
It is harder everyday to support Death Penalty.

I've decided that it is not cost effective. Lock 'em up and forget 'em.

25 posted on 03/12/2014 8:18:54 PM PDT by Mike Darancette (Do The Math)
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To: catbertz

Agreed


26 posted on 03/12/2014 8:34:45 PM PDT by Cen-Tejas (it's the debt bomb stupid!)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Excellent point!


27 posted on 03/12/2014 8:35:18 PM PDT by Cen-Tejas (it's the debt bomb stupid!)
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To: nickcarraway

I’m so glad there is a group that actively supports guys who claim innocence and, as it turns out, they are innocent of the crime involved.

Of course, most of those who claim innocence are probably lying. But there are some who really were not guilty of the crime. It makes me think that DNA evidence is a good thing.


28 posted on 03/12/2014 9:17:16 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Girlene

Still very little in the way of facts in this case. Does appear that Ford was in possession of items stolen in the robbery and his claim was that “a friend gave it to me” and that others were involved and at least one person testified against him. Appears that this woman may have changed her story. Is she lying now or then? Also the author makes sure that we know that he was convicted by an all White jury. We all know Whitey can’t be trusted to examine the evidence and render an impartial verdict.


29 posted on 03/12/2014 9:49:01 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux)
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To: Incorrigible
as a former death penalty person myself, I have also changed my mind due to sloppy or agenda work by both prosecutors and cops..
30 posted on 03/12/2014 10:08:48 PM PDT by goat granny (.)
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To: Eagles6

Could be, but it sounds like they have an “informant” that convinced them he was innocent of any murder. I doubt they would let him off death row after all this time unless they were forced to do so with the informant’s evidence or testimony.

The withholding evidence during trial should be a pretty big deal, especially in a death penalty case.


31 posted on 03/12/2014 10:24:04 PM PDT by Girlene (Hey, NSA!)
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To: Girlene

Sure. Sounds like these were all people who knew each other. The woman was the girlfriend of on of the brother’s that were implicated. I don’t know what happened to them. From what I’ve read the girlfriend changed her story and there is a jailhouse informant. Both hugely problematic and suspicious. Sounds like the prosecutors don’t want to retry the case and are cutting their losses. Maybe he had nothing to do with it and everyone lied.


32 posted on 03/12/2014 10:52:17 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux)
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To: dragnet2

Come on, this guy got to watch a kick ass rodeo twice a year.


33 posted on 03/12/2014 11:04:16 PM PDT by Rome2000
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To: Girlene

http://www.shreveporttimes.com/article/20140311/NEWS01/103110001/New-evidence-1983-homicide-case


34 posted on 03/12/2014 11:07:29 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux)
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To: Eagles6
The link that I just posted has more facts than any others. The facts show that rather than being railroaded by a racist prosecutor and jury it appears that he was involved in the murder. He just happened to be in the shop just before the murder, supposedly to ask for work. He just happened to pawn jewelry from the robbery given to him by someone he barely knew.

it sounds like he was at least involved in casing the shop and pawning the proceeds which makes him guilty of first degree murder.

Otherwise he went there to look for work. Shortly thereafter someone that Ford didn't know coincidentally entered the same shop, robbed the owner, murdered him and then, through a convergance of planets and stars met ford, gave a complete stranger jewelry stolen in the robbery and asked him to pawn it. Hmm...

35 posted on 03/12/2014 11:26:16 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux)
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To: nickcarraway

Around 100 people have been released from Death Row since 1990.

It’s very curious that, afterwards, the real murderer is NEVER identified and brought to trial.

Here in Washington state, every year investigators solve one or two cold case murders.

But no one ever solves the cold case murders where an innocent man was imprisoned, at least not that I’ve heard about, anyway.


36 posted on 03/12/2014 11:56:49 PM PDT by zeestephen
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To: Girlene

Someone else confessed to the crime. It was on my local news station. They didn’t specify whether or not DNA evidence was involved, but they said he would be paid $35,000 for every year incarcerated, up to $250,000, by the State of LA. Not enough for all he’s been through, in my opinion.

Just think of all he’s missed out on. I would not be as kind as he was on TV in the interview. Unbelievable.


37 posted on 03/13/2014 12:01:13 AM PDT by ASouthernGrl (BHO sucks - literally or metaphorically, you decide.)
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To: nickcarraway

For someone to say they are conservative but support capital punishment is to say they think the Government screws up everything it touches.....except the death penalty.


38 posted on 03/13/2014 10:51:51 AM PDT by gdani
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To: Carry_Okie

“Yup, that’s the problem, but then, why punish any crime because the perp might be falsely accused?”
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Unfortunately it seems that we may have reached the point at which that is a question to be seriously considered. We now have a criminal government at the national level and seem to be developing the same sort of government at state and local levels. We have a united states department of “justice” headed by an arch criminal. We have state and local law enforcement doing incredible things like shooting a one armed, one legged man who is in a wheelchair in a nursing home because he “cornered an officer and threatened him” WITH A BALL POINT PEN IN THE ONE HAND HE HAD LEFT.” That is just one example out of all too many. Maybe the wrong people are on the outside of the bars.

Now it seems that South Carolina lawmakers want to pass a law forbidding umbrellas of any size on the beach! I think I might prefer no law enforcement to the kind of insanity that is becoming so common. The current inclination seems more and more to be to punish the innocent and harmless and ignore the real criminals.


39 posted on 03/13/2014 11:43:08 AM PDT by RipSawyer
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To: RipSawyer
I think I might prefer no law enforcement to the kind of insanity that is becoming so common. The current inclination seems more and more to be to punish the innocent and harmless and ignore the real criminals.

That is a very different thing than 'ceasing punishment for criminals.' This nation was founded upon citizen law enforcement and I'm totally with you there. The key is to deal with liability laws.

40 posted on 03/13/2014 11:47:27 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (The tree of liberty needs a rope.)
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To: Cen-Tejas

“Juries are incompetent too.”
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

My one experience on a jury resulted in my being made foreman on a jurty trying a civil case. After witnessing the amazing incompetence of most (not all but the majority) of the jury members on that case I trembled at the thought that I might ever face a criminal charge. That was thirty plus years ago and I am sure the situation is far worse now. The only place you are likely to find justice is in the dictionary somewhere between jurisprudence and Jutland.


41 posted on 03/13/2014 11:59:03 AM PDT by RipSawyer
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To: Eagles6

I don’t know that that makes it first degree murder.

A reliable informant came forward and said the Robinson guy had admitted to shooting the store owner.

I’d say after 35 years, he has paid his price for involvement in trying to sell stolen goods.


42 posted on 03/13/2014 12:16:25 PM PDT by Girlene (Hey, NSA!)
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To: Girlene
If he was involved in a conspiracy,i.e., casing the store and disposing of the loot then he is as guilty as if he had pulled the trigger.

The informant says that Jake Robinson, who is right handed, supposedly admitted to shooting the victim while holding the gun in his left hand. Why would be do that?

Ford is left handed and expert testimony showed the shooter was probably left handed. It's just a little too pat.

Did Ford just happen to visit the victim's shop and then the owner was robbed and murdered shortly after and then a man that he didn't know just happened to give him stuff to pawn that just happened to be loot stolen in the robbery?

Maybe but highly unlikely.

If a complete stranger comes up to you on the street and asks you to pawn some valuable merchandise for him I would suggest you decline.

43 posted on 03/13/2014 3:21:10 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux)
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To: RipSawyer

I think the “jury” concept was born hundreds of years ago when people were different than they are now (putting it nicely).

There really should be an IQ test to be on a jury, among other things but I will stop here.


44 posted on 03/13/2014 3:34:38 PM PDT by Cen-Tejas (it's the debt bomb stupid!)
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To: Eagles6
If he was involved in a conspiracy,i.e., casing the store and disposing of the loot then he is as guilty as if he had pulled the trigger.

If you are speaking legally, I believe different states have different laws on the culpability of other people involved in the crime besides the shooter. In some states, it doesn't matter whether you are the shooter, if you are with them, you are just as guilty. If you are talking morally, I would agree if the plan was to murder the store owner. If the plan was to rob him and one person decides to shoot him instead of leaving, then no, I would say the shooter is guilty of first degree murder, not the other guy with him.

You could be right about the case, but the prosecution seemed confident enough in the informant to release Ford.

But, again, your theory could be right.

If a complete stranger comes up to you on the street and asks you to pawn some valuable merchandise for him I would suggest you decline.

lol, I will keep that in mind.
45 posted on 03/13/2014 7:29:07 PM PDT by Girlene (Hey, NSA!)
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To: Girlene
Too many of these cases turn out to be not what they seem and many, even some FReepers don't look past the agenda written articles.

Never know, he might be just a dumb, unlucky guy but...we'll see.

46 posted on 03/13/2014 9:08:05 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux)
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