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An Unconventional Desalination Technology Could Solve California's Water Shortage
Business Insider ^ | 03/12/2014 | By Dina Spector

Posted on 03/12/2014 8:25:27 PM PDT by ckilmer

An Unconventional Desalination Technology Could Solve California's Water Shortage

Business Insider
 

View photo.

WaterFX

WaterFX

A parabolic trough collects energy from the sun. The heat is used to evaporate clean water from the salty agricultural drainage water of irrigated crops.

This year, farmers in California's Central Valley likely won't receive any water through the federal irrigation program, a network of reservoirs, rivers, and canals that is normally replenished yearly by ice melt from the Sierra mountains.

Crippling water shortages have made desalination technology more attractive, including a startup, WaterFX, that uses the sun to produce heat. The heat separates salt and water through evaporation.

WaterFX has fewer environmental repercussions than traditional methods of desalination that rely on fossil fuels to generate electricity.

The technology could not have come at a better time.

No end in sight

During a drought-free year, the federally run Central Valley Project provides enough water to irrigate 3 million acres of agricultural land. Last year, farmers only received 20% of their allotment. 

The lack of water is not just worrying for growers. It affects all people who eat food. One third of the nation's produce is grown in the Central Valley — composed of Sacramento Valley in the north and San Joaquin Valley in the south — and the deep water cuts mean that more than half a million acres of crop land will be left unplanted.

Some scientists predict  California's drought could last as long as a century . Going forward, the state is going to need a substantial water supply that doesn't rely on the aqueduct system, says Aaron Mandell, WaterFX chairman and founder. 

However, in order to counter California's drought, the push must be toward renewable desalination plants rather than fossil-fuel dependent facilities that further contribute to climate change.

Making freshwater from sunshine

In WaterFX's system, a solar trough, which looks like a jumbo-sized curved mirror, collects energy from the sun's rays and transfers that heat to a pipe filled with mineral oil. The mineral oil feeds the heat into a system that evaporates the salty water being treated. Steam is produced, which condenses into pure liquid water. The remaining salt solidifies and can be removed, says Mandell. That salts can be used in other industries as building materials, metals, or fertilizers.

In order to operate continuously, the solar trough is very large so that it collects extra heat during the day. The energy is stored and used to run the system at night when the sun isn't shining.

By using sun as the fuel source, WaterFX uses roughly one-fifth of the electricity consumed by traditional desalination plants, according to Mandell. Less electricity means lower operating costs. With conventional desalination, electricity makes up 50-60% of the water costs, says Mandell. A typical desalination plant in San Diego operates at about $900 per acre-foot, while it costs around $450 to produce an acre-foot of water with WaterFX. (An acre-foot is 325,000 gallons, or the amount of water it takes to cover an acre at a depth of one foot).

 

WaterFX

WaterFX

WaterFX chairman and founder, Aaron Mandell.

"Solar desalination is still a very immature technology so there's a quite a bit of room to drive that cost down even further," said Mandell.

Many desalination facilities, including the $1 billion Carlsbad plant set to open in 2016, use a process known as reverse osmosis that forces seawater through billions of tiny holes that filter out salt and other impurities. This method can produce fresh water on a large scale, but has economic and environmental drawbacks. It uses an immense amount of electricity and only about half of the seawater that goes into the system comes out as clean water. The remaining half is dumped back into the ocean as salty brine where it can be harmful to marine plants and animals.

By contrast, Mandell says that WaterFX has a 93% recovery rate, meaning that for every 100 gallons of water that goes in, 93 gallons of usable water are spit out.

WaterFX also helps solve an issue that has long plagued irrigated land. Soils in the arid west of San Joaquin Valley naturally contain a lot of salt as well as high concentrations of metals, like selenium, which can be toxic to humans and wildlife. When the soil is irrigated, the salt, selenium, and other elements become concentrated in the drainage water that collects in a system of drains and pumps under the crops. In the past, harmful drainage water might have been discharged into rivers, wetlands, and aquifers in the San Joaquin Valley. Now, that otherwise unusable water can be diverted to WaterFX and turned into irrigation water again.

The first test

The Panoche Water District in Central Valley is home to the first demonstration plant, a 6,500-square foot system that is capable of producing around 10 gallons of freshwater a minute, or roughly 14,000 of freshwater each day.

When the demonstration plant is operating in commercial mode, running 24 hours a day, it can put out 25 to 30 gallons of freshwater a minute, says Mandell.

 

WaterFX

WaterFX

The pilot project, funded by the California Department of Water Resources, will hopefully prove that the WaterFX system is more reliable (it doesn't depend on the Sierra snowpack) and affordable than other freshwater sources.

The water that's being treated by the pilot plant streams in from a canal that collects salty drainage water from around 200 farms in the area and brings it to a single location. In the pilot phase, the clean water that's produced is blended back in with the drainage water, but a commercial plant would send the water back to farmers through a series of canals that are already in place.

Additionally, small-scale systems could be used by individual farmers on site to recycle their own drainage water.

A bright future

WaterFX is not the first company to experiment with solar desalination. The Sahara Forest project in Qatar and an Australian company called Sundrop Farms are using the technology to grow food in greenhouses. But this is the first time a company has focused on using the sun's energy "to produce a scalable, long-term water supply," Mandell said.

The goal is to eventually be able to treat salty groundwater in addition to drainage water.

The immediate next step for WaterFX is to expand operations in Panoche to produce 2 million gallons of water per day. "From there it's about laying out a pathway for replicating this model all up and down the Central Valley," Mandell said. "We're trying to put a plan in place so that by 2020, we may be in a position to wean ourselves off the aqueduct system entirely."


TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: centralvalley; desalination; solarthermal
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1 posted on 03/12/2014 8:25:27 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

$450@acre foot is world class if they can do it in scale.


2 posted on 03/12/2014 8:26:33 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

Sounds promising, but ... tagline.


3 posted on 03/12/2014 8:32:25 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (Screw the farmers. I can get everything I need at the grocery store.)
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To: ckilmer
mentioned in the article: Sundrop farms--an australian green house operation that uses solar power to desalinate seawater and heat the green house.

News

In the Media

July 2013: ABC’ Gardening Australia visits Sundrop Farms

In the Media

July 2013: ABC Catalyst visits Sundrop Farms

July 2013: Katars Wüste soll Millionen Menschen ernähren

Benjamin Reuter writes for the German magazine Wirtschafts Woche on Sundrop Farms’ participation in Qatar’s mission to become self-sufficient in food production. Full Article

November 2012: Growing Food in the Desert

Miracle in the Desert: Jonathan Margolis, an author and regular Observer contributor, travels to the Australian desert to discover an industrial Garden of Eden. Full Article

4 posted on 03/12/2014 8:32:59 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: MelonFarmerJ

Of possible interest to you.


5 posted on 03/12/2014 8:33:14 PM PDT by Enterprise ("Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire)
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To: ckilmer

California has no choice but to follow Israel’s path in desalination. With almost 40 million people, there isn’t enough fresh water to go around. The only place where there is a limitless supply of potential fresh water is the Pacific Ocean.

As desalination technologies improve and the cost goes down, pumping water from the sea will become increasingly attractive in addressing water shortages caused by drought and surging human, agricultural and industrial needs.

The time when we are dependent on the sea has finally come calling.


6 posted on 03/12/2014 8:34:37 PM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: ckilmer

The lack of water is not just worrying for growers. It affects all people who eat food.
***Yes it does. But there is this contingent of anti-science Luddites who refuse to examine the scientifically established alternatives, such as LENR for cheap desalination.

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/coldfusion/index?tab=articles

Just look at even the latest thread. Where do such skeptopaths even begin to look at the science behind the claims?


7 posted on 03/12/2014 8:41:03 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: goldstategop

Don’t forget, Kalifornia is a Communist state. Once the capital is invested and the infrastructure in place, the state will confiscate it “in the interest of the people.”


8 posted on 03/12/2014 8:48:01 PM PDT by Rembrandt (Part of the 51% who pay Federal taxes)
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To: ckilmer

“The lack of water is not just worrying for growers. It affects all people who eat food.”

Why... that’s almost all of ‘em.


9 posted on 03/12/2014 8:59:38 PM PDT by ArmstedFragg (Hoaxey Dopey Changey)
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To: ckilmer
Kept rereading the article to see if I missed something

When the demonstration plant is operating in commercial mode, running 24 hours a day, it can put out 25 to 30 gallons of freshwater a minute, says Mandell

Now, this is a SOLAR plant, right?

10 posted on 03/12/2014 9:02:07 PM PDT by stormhill
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To: stormhill

Is it possible it incorporates some sort of thermal storage so that it will keep going at night?


11 posted on 03/12/2014 9:03:38 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: ArmstedFragg

Yes, almost all of them.

A few are breatharians, for a few months anyway.


12 posted on 03/12/2014 9:14:00 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

That’s exactly it. The pipes are filled with salt that heats up during the day and cools at night.


13 posted on 03/12/2014 9:14:59 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Kevmo

such as LENR for cheap desalination
..............
LENR if/when it scales will collapse the cost of desalination.

My favorite energy cost killer is lftr thorium reactors. These have actually had demonstration plants in operation. (40 years ago) If/when they scale up, they’ll pull the cost of electricity down to 1/4-1/10 current cheapest cost coal/natural gas plant electrical generator.

LENR looks to make energy costs even cheaper. Which is great if it happens.

Another form of LENR that looks interesting to me is Dense Plasma Focus. http://bit.ly/1fsf7qb

There’s a couple variants of that.

It does look like there’s more interest/excitement in the LENR world. It stands to reason therefor — that articles from more mainstream publications in the next year or so will do pieces on LENR—as has happened with LFTR thorium reactors in the last two years.

LENR tests are not expensive. The work at MIT look pretty impressive. So it stands to reason there ought to be more big science university/government/corporate labs coming out with corroborating tests in the next year. There should be more scientists popping up with positive results. All you have to do is report them telling everyone ...just the facts mam.

In the end the keys to a successful 21st century are cheap water and cheap energy. It doesn’t really matter just how its done. Just that it gets done.


14 posted on 03/12/2014 9:23:26 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ArmstedFragg

I considered becoming a Breatharian for the monetary savings and issues like this thread topic, but I decided to go with something longer term, even though it will be more expensive.


15 posted on 03/12/2014 9:27:31 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Libertarianism offers the transitory concepts and dialogue to move from conservatism, to liberalism)
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To: ckilmer

I’d do something ambitious and radical. Buy up all the land inside the Salton Sea Basin (up to Sea Level) then with Treaty with Mexico, create a large Canal (large enough for cargo and ocean lining ships, along with fishing ships) to go through to the Gulf.

It would serve both as an inland port, an endless supply of water through desalinization + would provide many miles of coastline for tourism, and wildlife coastal refuge.

-J.S. (Of course likely this would never happen especially in CA, but it would give all parties a worth-while resource).


16 posted on 03/12/2014 9:30:51 PM PDT by JSDude1 (Defeat Hagan, elect a Constutional Conservative: Dr. Greg Brannon!)
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To: ckilmer

In the end the keys to a successful 21st century are cheap water and cheap energy.
***That is my view as well. If it is by way of LFTR, then great. But when I look at the 2 technologies, I vastly favor LENR.


17 posted on 03/12/2014 9:38:40 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: stormhill

“Now, this is a SOLAR plant, right? “

If that’s really true, why is there a Natural Gas regulator and gas train attached to the equipment?


18 posted on 03/12/2014 9:44:19 PM PDT by vette6387
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To: Kevmo
***Yes it does. But there is this contingent of anti-science Luddites who refuse to examine the scientifically established alternatives, such as LENR for cheap desalination.

LENR? You mean Cold Fusion? Yeah, it's all the fault of luddites. You'd think if it were a real technology people would have done it by now. If you can do it, do it.

19 posted on 03/12/2014 9:45:34 PM PDT by Alter Kaker (Gravitation is a theory, not a fact. It should be approached with an open mind...)
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To: Kevmo

I vastly favor LENR.
.....
The promise of LENR is the greater of the two. The reality of LFTR is the greater of the two.

We’ll see. Tables could be turned this year or not.


20 posted on 03/12/2014 9:55:42 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: Alter Kaker
Then if Controlled Hot Fusion is so viable, where is my CHF jet pack or car or water heater?
people would have done it by now.

21 posted on 03/12/2014 9:59:21 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: stormhill

Now, this is a SOLAR plant, right?
.....
It doesn’t look like they’re converting solar power to electricity. Rather they’re heating a molton salt solution that vaporizes salt water. The steam is goes through a condenser and comes out as fresh water.

There’s a link up thread — to a sundrop farms green house project in Australia that uses solar thermal to desalinate water and heat green houses.


22 posted on 03/12/2014 9:59:27 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: vette6387

“Now, this is a SOLAR plant, right? “

If that’s really true, why is there a Natural Gas regulator and gas train attached to the equipment?
................
If you read the articles and view the video of the sundrop farms green house experiment in australia, you’ll notice that they also have a back up oil generator. For times when the sun don’t shine.

Its not a complete solution as yet and won’t be until the gas/oil generators are no longer needed.


23 posted on 03/12/2014 10:03:25 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

Corn needs about 1 acre foot of water to grow properly. Of course this is all dependent on soil type and environment and wind and temperature. If you can grow 150 bushels of corn under ideal conditions you are looking at $3.33 dollars of expense per bushel of corn in water that is produced by this method. This puts corn out of the question as a crop to be grown using this method of water production. The point is that this method is only viable for high value crops that need much less water.

I am not against this method of water production but one must always remember what it costs to do it, and what can you sell your crop for.

If you want to know how to utilize limited water resources in agriculture, go to Israel. They have little water and use what they have to the absolute max efficiency.


24 posted on 03/12/2014 10:03:30 PM PDT by cpdiii (Deckhand, Roughneck, Mud Man, Geologist, Pilot, Pharmacist. THE CONSTITUTION IS WORTH DYING FOR!)
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To: Kevmo
Then if Controlled Hot Fusion is so viable, where is my CHF jet pack or car or water heater?

Huh? I'm not at all sure it's viable either. However, I will say this: at least there's no doubt that hot fusion exists. But anybody who says that fusion of any kind is a serious answer to California's near term water woes is delusional.

25 posted on 03/12/2014 10:03:54 PM PDT by Alter Kaker (Gravitation is a theory, not a fact. It should be approached with an open mind...)
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To: ckilmer

Interesting position. We should start a LFTR vs. LENR thread. But how do you stop all the skeptopaths from showing up? The simple fact is, the mods here are not educated enough in energy technology to handle such a thread. It would be needed to be done elsewhere.


26 posted on 03/12/2014 10:05:22 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Kevmo

It’s the bomb.


27 posted on 03/12/2014 10:05:56 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: Kevmo

Even worse the reproducibility of this stuff is fitful at best. Nobody’s been able to come up with a consistent cold fusor, or even a theory why they can’t come up with a consistent cold fusor. We’re back at the level of alchemy, if even that good. Maybe someone didn’t arrange the chicken entrails the right way the previous night at dinner? I am facetious on purpose, but a science this ain’t. Yet.


28 posted on 03/12/2014 10:08:11 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: ckilmer

Another obama pipe dream hoax.

“a 6,500-square foot system that is capable of producing around 10 gallons of freshwater a minute, or roughly 14,000 of freshwater each day.”

The above figure assumes the sun is shinning 23 hours a day: in reality solar only works well for about 8 hours a day. So, in reality, it’s going to take about a 20,000 square foot unit for 14,000 gallons a day. For an acre foot of water per day then, it will take a 47,000 square foot system.

The Carlsbad plant will produce 46,000 acre feet per day, which means the solar system will require 2,162,000,000 square feet of installation of panels, or 274 square miles of solar panels to equal the $1 billion Carlsbad plant. Anybody want to guess how many trillions of dollars it would cost to build 274 square miles of solar panels?


29 posted on 03/12/2014 10:09:24 PM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Vote Republican in 2012 and only be called racist one more time!)
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To: Alter Kaker

near term water woes
***Agreed. I’m talking longer term. Of course, for the last 150 years or so, California’s biggest political battles have been over water.

My favorite plan was to dam up the SF bay.

http://www.amazon.com/Simulation-Similarity-Understand-Studies-Philosophy/dp/0199933669


30 posted on 03/12/2014 10:10:38 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Reproducibility...
Fitful yes, but definitive, all the more.

How many times has the F-P Anomalous Heat Effect been replicated?

31 posted on 03/12/2014 10:14:45 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: ckilmer

Great if it is affordable. But I predict some three striped mud snail will be found in a runoff ditch and the enirostatists will shut it down.

We have 50 year old technology called nuclear power. We also have thousands of years old called reservoirs and canals.


32 posted on 03/12/2014 10:19:09 PM PDT by Organic Panic
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To: Kevmo

“An average of 14 cells”

out of what... what does the statistical distribution actually look like...

At best, it looks like some maddeningly un-pin-downable thing. I’d say why not, out of the contents of every cell or whatever, save a pre-reaction sample. If it looks like it reacted, then analyze the sample. Or how about putting the samples of the successful cells together, and then you should get near 100% reliable reaction? It ain’t rocket science. But it does look like farting around.


33 posted on 03/12/2014 10:20:28 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: ckilmer
It affects all people who eat food.

As opposed too...?

34 posted on 03/12/2014 10:23:58 PM PDT by Doomonyou (Let them eat Lead.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

It’s about thousands of experiments going from 45% reproducibility to 85% in 5 years. And others have gotten 100% reproducibility since this report.

http://newenergytimes.com/v2/library/2004/2004Krivit-The2004ColdFusionReport.pdf

Page 48.


35 posted on 03/12/2014 10:34:21 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

“An average of 14 cells”

out of what...
***Dolly the Sheep was loudly proclaimed as a success and that was 1 out of more than 100,000 failures. LENR is past the 50% reproducibility mark and FReepers act as if that’s somehow scientifically invalid.


36 posted on 03/12/2014 10:36:51 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Kevmo

I think they did prove genetically that Dolly was what Dolly was claimed. That counted for a lot. You get heat. Heat from what? Artifact of processing the powder?


37 posted on 03/12/2014 10:40:18 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: Kevmo

If some people are getting it near perfect that’s where the cutting edge research is. Wonderful. Everybody else ought to be imitating them.

Something needs to rule out physico-chemical effects though.


38 posted on 03/12/2014 10:42:09 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

You get far, far more heat than can be accounted for by adding Deuterium gas to Palladium, or H1 atomic gas to Nickel. Like 3 or 4 orders of magnitude more heat. So all of this focus on error bars of 1% or milliwatts is a bunch of horse manure when the heat measured is ten thousand times more than that.


39 posted on 03/12/2014 10:42:54 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Eventually, that will be the case. But when you spend your time hunting big game, you tend to ignore rabbits.


40 posted on 03/12/2014 10:43:58 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Think about it: What if there was an entrenched set of real smart scientists who would have their funding DRASTICALLY reduced when Dolly was produced? They would have pulled out ALL the stops in their welcome of this new cloning technology that only works 1/1000th % of the time, wouldn’t they?

So... why don’t we have a bunch of clamor surrounding Dolly the Sheep? Because there is no such entrenched competition for resources, that’s why.


41 posted on 03/12/2014 11:03:42 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Kevmo

Nobody wise sees science as a zero sum game as long as it is truthful.


42 posted on 03/12/2014 11:10:43 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: Kevmo

And competition conspiracy games?

Who wouldn’t WANT a cold fusion battery that you could count on? But they aren’t going to jump at the chance to do it until someone shows it isn’t smoke and mirrors.

Too often, hoaxes HAVE driven scientists astray.

This is like saying doctors don’t want cancer cured because now what happens to cancer treatment profits... forgetting that if what is a myriad of conditions could be cured in one fell swoop then that would leave a lot of surviving people that need OTHER kinds of health care still. If it isn’t cancer it’s Alzheimer’s. Or whatever. This mortal coil is guaranteed to come with sickness and death risk of some kind.


43 posted on 03/12/2014 11:14:51 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

We cannot even assume MIT nor Caltech to be wise nor truthful in this pursuit.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CDsQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.infinite-energy.com%2Fiemagazine%2Fissue66%2Fexposing.html&ei=ZE8hU_S3HM_goATinYHQAw&usg=AFQjCNFRScKNeCRHamaXgbWO8W-zTvaSMg&sig2=BhWJlQZzGCU-lF0QfQtqJg


44 posted on 03/12/2014 11:26:31 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Kevmo

So ignore them, they are not the whole world of science as if they could force it into a bottle.

Nonetheless if you ultimately want the big players to pay attention, then you got to get your reliability pretty well up there. Your choice on how to do it, but mad science to mainstream science is not going to happen if the mad scientists don’t try to make it happen.


45 posted on 03/12/2014 11:35:58 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

And competition conspiracy games?
***No comprehende, senior.

Who wouldn’t WANT a cold fusion battery that you could count on?
***The guys who have been paid for decades NOT to produce such progress.

But they aren’t going to jump at the chance to do it until someone shows it isn’t smoke and mirrors.
***Of course, anyone who drew their salary from CHF would KNOW that the solution is 50 years off, so they would be utterly dismissive of a claim, even when it is clear for everyone else to see.

Too often, hoaxes HAVE driven scientists astray.
***Then those idiot scientists need to suck it up and learn something. LENR is littered with former skeptics such as Levi, Focardi, Kowalski, Essen, Tsakiris, Duncan, and even Storms (plus plenty others).

This is like saying doctors don’t want cancer cured because now what happens to cancer treatment profits...
***No, it isn’t like that at all. This is a suppressed science, where the work is done under the radar until the convincing demo like the Wright Brothers did, which threw all of current aeronautical science on its ear.


46 posted on 03/12/2014 11:37:53 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

True enough, until crowd sourcing catches on.


47 posted on 03/12/2014 11:39:03 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Kevmo

So get your convincing demo. Soon everyone was building replicas of the Wright machine if not buying it from the Wrights.

I’m just saying what that demo will look like. And it won’t look like black magic where the demons have to be in a good mood.


48 posted on 03/12/2014 11:39:55 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

The thing to keep in mind is: The Wright brothers were no frauds. They kept their demo locked up for 5 friggin years while a stream of lookieloos came by asking about it, but none of those lookieloos would agree to buy their airplanes if it were demo’d. Those lookieloo A@@#0|e$ were just trying to steal the secret, figuring that if a couple of bicycle mechanics could unleash the amazing secret, it couldn’t be that hard. It took 5 friggin years before the Wrights had a contract they could demo to. The same dynamic operates today, but on a bigger scale with players that have $billions in their pocket and can STRONGLY influence the patent process and others involved.


49 posted on 03/12/2014 11:46:40 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: catnipman

Well done. Also, if they put the plant near the farms they’ll be using farm land to produce water instead of food. Solar technology isn’t as advanced as the desalination seems to be. And, being California I have no doubt the eco-nazis will find a reason why it can’t be used. I’m hearing stories of entire towns with dry wells where water is being trucked in every day and towns along I-5 running out of water for several hours a day requiring businesses to close. We are the new dust bowl and most of it is man made. This idea is not the solution. Too little too late.


50 posted on 03/12/2014 11:51:03 PM PDT by athelass (Proud Mom of a Sailor & 2 Marines - Clinging to my Bible and my guns for dear life.)
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