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CNN Poll: Rand Paul goes where his father never went
CNN ^ | 16 Mar 2014

Posted on 03/16/2014 10:38:49 AM PDT by mandaladon

Washington (CNN) - Rand Paul has done something his father never did - top the list of potential Republican presidential candidates in a national poll.

According to a new CNN/ORC International survey, 16% of Republicans and independents who lean toward the GOP say they would be likely to support the senator from Kentucky for the 2016 nomination.

Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the 2012 Republican vice presidential nominee, garnered 15%, with longtime Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who's considering another bid for the White House, at 11%.

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, a 2008 GOP presidential candidate, is the only other Republican tested in the survey to crack double digits.

The poll's sampling error means that statistically it's not a win for Paul, but his finish is a breakthrough for his family.

A national Quinnipiac poll found Paul tied with Ryan in January for the top spot. That appears to be as close as either Rand Paul or his father, Ron Paul, has ever come to nabbing first place all by himself in any national poll.

Among the other potential presidential hopefuls in the new CNN survey, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is at 9%, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas each at 8%.

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida registered 5% and former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, who battled eventual GOP nominee Mitt Romney deep into the 2012 GOP primary and caucus calendar, polled 3%.

(Excerpt) Read more at politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Extended News; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: 2016gopprimary; 2016polls; agitprop; cruz; demagogue; obama; paul; paul2016; pearlharbor; randsconcerntrolls; randspimppatrol; tedcruz; texas
Paul,Cruz,Perry...I could support any of them...my first choice is Cruz.
1 posted on 03/16/2014 10:38:49 AM PDT by mandaladon
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To: mandaladon

I agree


2 posted on 03/16/2014 11:00:03 AM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied .. the economy died.)
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To: mandaladon

As Ernest Hemmmingway wrote; The Son Also Rises. In this case higher than those before him. My top choices include; Cruz, Paul, Rubio (I forgive you Marco!), and Gov. Walker. Santorum may want to get on the ‘On Call” list for Firing Line, in case Newt gets a tummy ache.


3 posted on 03/16/2014 11:00:42 AM PDT by lee martell
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To: mandaladon
Texas Gov. Perry throws support behind McConnell
4 posted on 03/16/2014 11:05:04 AM PDT by TomGuy
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To: mandaladon
Rand comes across as more down to earth than his dad. He doesn't allow himself to zing off into outer space about foreign policy matters, even though I think foreign policy is a weakness with Rand. Well we know everybody, ESPECIALLY politicians, have their faults no matter how much people want to align with them. We shouldn't give politicians so much power in out attitudes. If you like somebody, great, but don't fool yourself into thinking he's perfect, especially when you give him POWER over you. Electing a politician is like making a treaty with a potential enemy, you must TRUST BUT VERIFY and make them accountable by kicking them out if they build government and their bureaucray rather than cut taxes and government.

I like Rand because he seems like the strongest proponent for seriously cutting government and taxes and seems to best understand the alternative - the free market.

5 posted on 03/16/2014 11:09:49 AM PDT by PapaNew
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To: mandaladon

“Washington (CNN) - Rand Paul has done something his father never did - top the list of potential Republican presidential candidates in a national poll.”

That will change once it becomes widely known what the Liberaltarian turd stands for.

The fact that Ron Paul in now defending Putin’s invasion of the Ukraine, and Rand is just like his old man, but in better camo, will sink in long before 2016.


6 posted on 03/16/2014 11:11:31 AM PDT by Beagle8U (Unions are an Affirmative Action program for Slackers! .)
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To: Beagle8U

lol, he’s not defending it. He’s pointing out that Obama has been outmaneuvered by Putin, which, unfortunately, is true.


7 posted on 03/16/2014 11:18:16 AM PDT by NYCslicker
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To: mandaladon

I really, really, like Rand Paul, but his stance on Illegal Immigration is disturbing, to say the least.

How can he not realize how destructive another onslaught would be?


8 posted on 03/16/2014 11:21:05 AM PDT by NH Liberty ("For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men, the Man Christ Jesus..." [1 Timothy 2:5])
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To: NH Liberty
How can he not realize how destructive another onslaught would be?

Not to him.

9 posted on 03/16/2014 11:24:40 AM PDT by Balding_Eagle (Over production, one of the top 5 worries for the American Farmer every year.)
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To: NYCslicker

Wrong!...

“The former Republican congressman and three-time presidential candidate Ron Paul has launched a scathing attack on what he calls a US-backed coup in Ukraine, insisting the Crimean people have the right to align their territory with Moscow and characterising sanctions against Russia as “an act of war”.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/15/ron-paul-crimea-russia-sanctions-act-of-war


10 posted on 03/16/2014 11:37:20 AM PDT by Beagle8U (Unions are an Affirmative Action program for Slackers! .)
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To: NYCslicker

There isn’t a dimes worth of difference between Ron and Runt Paul.


11 posted on 03/16/2014 11:40:59 AM PDT by Beagle8U (Unions are an Affirmative Action program for Slackers! .)
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To: Beagle8U

Rand sounds like a moron


12 posted on 03/16/2014 11:42:19 AM PDT by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
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To: NH Liberty

Could someone sensibly point out what there is about Rand Paul to like as a politician?


13 posted on 03/16/2014 11:43:34 AM PDT by stanne
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To: lee martell

I think Rand is in the wrong party, I would never vote libtardian


14 posted on 03/16/2014 11:45:01 AM PDT by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
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To: NYCslicker; Beagle8U

You are correct. Beagle8U is incorrect.


15 posted on 03/16/2014 11:48:23 AM PDT by entropy12 (If you did not vote, you helped elect the community organizer from south side of Chicago.)
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To: NH Liberty

I spent several days in Singapore last week trying to figure out why it is so prosperous. My findings were, low taxes, few government benefits, and 2 year work permits to foreign workers. The work permits help them track who is there and utilize labor help as needed. We should do similar policy.


16 posted on 03/16/2014 11:51:48 AM PDT by entropy12 (If you did not vote, you helped elect the community organizer from south side of Chicago.)
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To: mandaladon

Ditto for me. All good men.


17 posted on 03/16/2014 11:54:14 AM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose o f a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: mandaladon
Sorry Rand. You stand with unlimited immigration and I don't.
18 posted on 03/16/2014 11:57:00 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: stanne
Could someone sensibly point out what there is about Rand Paul to like as a politician?

I am convinced that 90% of Rand Paul's appeal is that he is demonstrably not GOP-e.

19 posted on 03/16/2014 12:02:58 PM PDT by okie01 (The Mainstream Media -- IGNORANCE ON PARADE)
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To: okie01

He supports McConnell, attacks Cruz.

He’s not GOPe? OK, how is he better?


20 posted on 03/16/2014 12:19:24 PM PDT by stanne
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To: mandaladon

I do not trust Rand Paul. I think he’s changeable and we already have a man in the White House who said one thing prior to the election, .. then did the opposite after being elected.


21 posted on 03/16/2014 12:26:27 PM PDT by frnewsjunkie
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To: okie01

Actually Rand does appear more and more to be GOPe, for instance he is embracing social liberalism, and to make him even more rino, he is showing that he has been conning us for years on his politics as he starts his move left.


22 posted on 03/16/2014 12:27:32 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Libertarianism offers the transitory concepts and dialogue to move from conservatism, to liberalism)
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To: mandaladon
Rand is a charlatan.
23 posted on 03/16/2014 12:33:59 PM PDT by right way right (America has embraced the suck of Freedumb.)
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To: mandaladon

Funny, something about this guy says he’s not to be trusted.


24 posted on 03/16/2014 12:34:00 PM PDT by kenmcg
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To: mandaladon

CNN is salivating.


25 posted on 03/16/2014 12:35:42 PM PDT by right way right (America has embraced the suck of Freedumb.)
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To: entropy12

You’re wrong also...see post 10.


26 posted on 03/16/2014 1:03:58 PM PDT by Beagle8U (Unions are an Affirmative Action program for Slackers! .)
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To: GeronL

He is a moron, all Liberaltarians are.


27 posted on 03/16/2014 1:06:54 PM PDT by Beagle8U (Unions are an Affirmative Action program for Slackers! .)
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To: mandaladon

he’s no Dr Ron Paul...but he IS among the top tier of lessers of evil...but who’s willing to settle for that...especially at this stage of the game...

Semper Watching !
Dick.G: AMERICAN !!!!!!
*****


28 posted on 03/16/2014 1:08:58 PM PDT by gunnyg ("A Constitution changed from Freedom, can never be restored; Liberty, once lost, is lost forever...)
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To: stanne
He’s not GOPe? OK, how is he better?

Did I say he was?

No, I said that 90% of his support came from folks who thought he was anti-GOP-e.

I'm on your side...

Frankly, I think Rand is a lot like his dad. He likes stirring things up. But, having done so, Rand will retreat to the "big tent" -- while his dad would continue circling the fire, beating his drum.

29 posted on 03/16/2014 3:14:34 PM PDT by okie01 (The Mainstream Media -- IGNORANCE ON PARADE)
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To: Beagle8U

>>That will change once it becomes widely known what the Liberaltarian turd stands for.

In my opinion, Ron and Rand appear to me to be very honorable men, despite the smears, mocking, and insults directed against them. I have found the usual onslaught of attacks on both of them not to be substantiated by fact. You, of course, are entitled to your opinion, as am I.

As it pertains to Putin, I found this article to be personally enlightening:

Sorry, Putin Isn’t Crazy
Why Russians have good reason to suspect the West’s motives in Ukraine.
BY JEFFREY TAYLER MARCH 11, 2014

While discussing the Russian invasion of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula on CBS’s Face The Nation recently, Secretary of State John Kerry remarked: “You just don’t in the 21st century behave in 19th-century fashion by invading another country on [a] completely trumped-up pretext.” He also warned that President Obama “has all options on the table” — including the use of military force, though he said that option would “not serve the world well.” In speaking with Obama last weekend, German chancellor Angela Merkel reportedly opined that the Russian head of state may have lost “touch with reality” and appeared to be “living in another world.”

Obama himself has accusedPutin of viewing the Ukraine crisis as part of a “some Cold War chessboard,” and of “keeping one foot in the old [Cold War] ways of doing business.”
Obama himself has accused Putin of viewing the Ukraine crisis as part of a “some Cold War chessboard,” and of “keeping one foot in the old [Cold War] ways of doing business.”

Criticisms of Russia’s military action have been coming from all quarters. Nonetheless, these comments by western leaders merit special examination. They seem to be based on a shared conclusion: In taking over the Crimea, President Putin has behaved irrationally, operating on a set of erroneous, perhaps even crazed, assumptions. Chief among these is the notion that the West, and the United States in particular, backed the “Euromaidan” street protests that recently overthrew Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych. Farfetched as it may seem to Western leaders, a recent Levada Center opinion poll shows that a plurality — 43 percent — of Putin’s compatriots agree with him.

It should surprise no one that Putin has concluded that the United States was behind the Euromaidan protests. He famously blamed the 2011 eruption of opposition demonstrations in Russia on meddling American NGOs. Moreover, in February, Victoria Nuland, a State Department official, declared that since Ukraine achieved independence in 1991, the U.S. government has spent more than $5 billion to “assist” it in building “democratic skills,” “civic participation,” and “good governance.” Aid has been provided, as far as is known, under the Freedom Support Act passed in 1992 to help stimulate former Soviet economies using American funds. But to Russians, Nuland’s words have been interpreted to mean that the United States fomented the Euromaidan, paid its participants, and instructed them in the use of weapons. “Western instructors” Putin said last week in a press conference, did their best to train the Euromaidan’s “armed brigades.”

In suspecting the United States’ involvement in the Euromaidan, has Putin taken leave of his senses? Kerry and Merkel seem to have forgotten, or chosen to ignore, the numerous aggressive steps the United States has taken since the end of the Cold War to reduce Russia’s influence, to say nothing of American-backed military interventions and invasions across the globe. As the nuclear standoff between the two superpowers waned, the West’s most powerful military alliance, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), has expanded three times, despite President George H. W. Bush’s apparent promise to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev not to enlarge the group. NATO inducted the Baltic states in 2004, and laid the groundwork for the membership of Ukraine and Georgia. Yanukovych scuppered such plans relating to Ukraine in 2010, but deputies of the new Ukrainian parliament have just introduced a bill proposing the country again seek membership.

The Soviet Union is no more, but the entity created specifically to counter its military might thrives, as has the Pentagon’s budget, which increased relentlessly until 2011, topping $700 billion. Furthermore, in 2002, the United States withdrew unilaterally from its treaty with Moscow banning anti-ballistic missiles and plans to station such missiles in Eastern Europe. The conclusion Putin has drawn? The United States is bent on maintaining and increasing its hegemony — at Russia’s expense.

Are invasions a “19th-century” means of dealing with unpalatable regimes? A survey of post-Cold War history gives reason to think otherwise. In 1994 the U.S. military embargoed Haiti and sent troops in to reinstate ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. That same year, President Clinton began deploying the military (under NATO’s aegis) in the Balkans in operations that culminated in 1999 with a 78-day bombing campaign against Serbia that led to the secession of Kosovo and, eventually, to the imprisonment and extradition (to The Hague) of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic. In 2001, the United States invaded Afghanistan, drove the Taliban from power, and oversaw the election of President Hamid Karzai. Two years later, the George W. Bush administration orchestrated a “Coalition of the Willing” to invade Iraq and depose President Saddam Hussein, whom it eventually handed over to the Iraqi government for trial and execution. The Iraq War’s casus belli — weapons of mass destruction — was never found. (If there ever was a “trumped-up pretext,” that was it.) In 2011, under the guise of enforcing a no-fly zone in Libya, the United States provided critical military support to Western coalition forces in Operation Odyssey Dawn, which ended with the overthrow, hunting down, and brutal extrajudicial execution of Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi.

Far from being “19th-century” behavior, bombing, invading, and toppling regimes remain options the United States has been willing to deploy against its adversaries.
Far from being “19th-century” behavior, bombing, invading, and toppling regimes remain options the United States has been willing to deploy against its adversaries. Qaddafi’s execution in particular is known to have disturbed Putin. In 2011, Putin repeatedly and angrily denounced NATO for using the no-fly zone it imposed on Libya as a pretext for allowing Qaddafi’s killing. A similar fate may have awaited Yanukovych had he not managed to flee to Russia. Swift Western recognition of Ukraine’s new interim government, which came to power via mass demonstrations afterYanukovych had ceded to opposition demands for new parliamentary and presidential elections (in which he surely faced defeat), can only have reinforced Putin’s conviction that not only was the United States working to undermine his allies, it even sanctions regime change that might threaten his own physical survival.

The West, and especially the United States, needs to acknowledge that the invasions and changes of regime they have carried out have done nothing to dispel notions that they seek world hegemony, and have convinced Putin that he is locked in a struggle not only for Russian dominance in its near-abroad, but for the future of his government — and even, possibly, for his life. They have targeted authoritarian rulers in the past, and suspecting them of doing so now makes eminent sense; Putin is taking history’s lesson to heart. This is no mere call for a reexamination of the U.S. history of robust interventions across the globe, interventions of which the Russian leader is no doubt a student. President Obama and his hectoring Secretary of State should take as a given the rank cynicism these interventions have long generated outside America’s borders and formulate their addresses — and policies — to take it into account.

It would also behoove Obama in particular to come clean to the American people and fess up to what has become painfully obvious during his two terms: there are problems abroad, bloody and tragic as they may be, that the United States simply cannot solve through military intervention or otherwise. It has little leverage to counter Russian influence in Ukraine or dislodge Russian forces from the Crimea. The Cold War is over, to be sure, but the “chessboard” on which Russia and the United States play is much reduced — reduced, in fact, to Russia’s back yard. Putin can be expected to care what happens there and work hard to steer events in his country’s favor. And Putin is not the only one to see responses to crises as plays on a “chessboard.” If Obama owns up to this, he might well end up averting a potentially catastrophic challenge match.

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/03/11/sorry_putin_isnt_crazy


30 posted on 03/16/2014 4:21:58 PM PDT by Right-wing Librarian
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To: Beagle8U

Crimea does have the right to align itself with who it wishes.

That statement has nothing to do with defending Putin. It has to do with the right of Crimea to determine its own fate.

Stop assuming that everything in which the U.S. is not the policeman of the world is bad.


31 posted on 03/17/2014 4:27:39 PM PDT by NYCslicker
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