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The Kids Are All Right
Townhall.com ^ | March 24, 2014 | Mark Baisley

Posted on 03/24/2014 9:41:41 AM PDT by Kaslin

Growing up in the 60’s, my older brother, Wayne, made certain that I was properly schooled in the fine art of psychedelic rock. He was generous with his sophisticated collection of vinyl and kindly tolerated my tagging along to live concerts by The Who, Blues Magoos, and Fever Tree. We even saw Sam the Sham & the Pharaohs once.

My friends and I followed musicians like baseball card athletes as they migrated between The Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin, Cream, Buffalo Springfield, and Blind Faith. I came to understand that Frank Zappa was equal parts profound & bananas and that the best version of Summertime Blues was recorded by Blue Cheer. In that explosively creative era, popular music evolved rapidly in the wake of the innovative leadership of the Beatles.

But as the decade was wrapping up, the Vietnam War was escalating. I remember how depressing CBS News sounded every evening, a nightly drumbeat of American casualty numbers accompanied by unsettling images from the front lines. The closest that my friends and I approached an understanding of the war was that it was morose, no end in sight, and that we were approaching draft age.

Even our favorite bands felt the impact. A local group known as The Moving Sidewalks lost their keyboard and bass players to the U.S. Army. The two remaining members added another talent and reorganized the band as ZZ Top.

In time, musicians began to unify the nation’s growing discontent with Washington by producing a list of “protest songs” initiated by Stephen Stills’ very civil For What It’s Worth. The cleverness of pop lyrics increasingly focused on poking Congress and President Nixon in the eye, leading up to the Woodstock music festival in August of 1969. The most undisguised slight came from Country Joe & The Fish singing their original rag with a chorus ending in, “Whoopee! We’re all going to die.”

Counterculture suddenly became serious business in 1970 when members of the Ohio National Guard overreacted to a student protest on the Kent State University campus. Skittish guardsmen fired 67 rounds into the crowd, killing four students and injuring nine others. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young immediately released a responsive song with the lyrics, “Tin soldiers and Nixon coming, We're finally on our own. This summer I hear the drumming,Four dead in Ohio.”

America matured immensely in the decade that followed. The war was brought to a terrifically awkward end, Richard Nixon resigned the presidency, and the United States military transitioned into a respected volunteer profession. While much was gained in the transformation, the musical voice of antiestablishment was somehow lost.

Out of curiosity, I read the lyrics to all the songs on the current American Top 40 this week. Most are readily forgettable complaints about dysfunctional relationships. There are a few unique and thoughtful scripts, two brief and repetitive ditties, and one libretto with a contrived reference to Jeffrey Dahmer. I believe that we can surmise the reason that the weapons of sheet music have gone silent is that the worldview of Washington leadership is now in synch with the majority of traditions-rejecting songwriters. Nowadays Clancy can’t even sing a protest song.

It is often said that suffering emotes the most powerful music. And while there is certainly no shortage of performing talent in America, there is no Vietnam provoking their collective objection. Rather, there is a gradual social seduction being masterfully orchestrated directly from the White House. Even 70’s folk rocker James Taylor recently threw in all his chips with the surrendering statement, “we need to make some sacrifices to our freedoms.”

Dissent from younger, creative folks does exist. It is simply not concentrated in response to a single threat. When clever videographer Caleb Bonham recently interviewed college students at George Mason University, he received the following prioritization of political issues that are on the minds of students: (1) Benghazi?(2) Obama’s “If you like your plan, you can keep your plan” promise?(3) DOJ spying on AP reporters?(4) The Fast and Furious gun-running scandal?(5) IRS targeting conservative groups?(6) The botched rollout of Healthcare.gov?(7) Obama bypassing Congress to delay elements of Obamacare, and?(8) NSA collection of citizens’ email and phone data. Encouraging.

Millions of American left brains have been exercising the OODA process for a long time; Observe, Orient, Decide, Act. It is time for a complementary renaissance from those whose gifts lie in the right brain. We need bigger music and meaningful words, someone who can call out the statists and sound a call to action for citizens. Where are those artists who will renew the soul of the nation in song? Where have all the flowers gone?


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: civildisobedience; counterculture; hippies
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1 posted on 03/24/2014 9:41:41 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin
Merle Harrard:

"you talk bad about the USA, you're steppin on the fightin side of me"

2 posted on 03/24/2014 9:45:02 AM PDT by atc23 (The Confederacy was the single greatest conservative resistance to federal authority ever)
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To: atc23

Haggard! not Haddard


3 posted on 03/24/2014 9:45:30 AM PDT by atc23 (The Confederacy was the single greatest conservative resistance to federal authority ever)
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To: Kaslin

Two things.

1. This reads like some nostalgic liberal wrote this but it’s from Town Hall, a supposedly conservative source.

2. His little walk down memory lane well illustrates the emptiness of the baby boomer lives and indicates one reason we are in this mess.


4 posted on 03/24/2014 9:51:26 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: Kaslin

I’ve been unhappy about this for quite awhile. From Dylan to Buffalo Springfield to the Clash, musicians used to be an angry bunch and I think that is not such a bad thing. But today, musicians just seem complacent and supportive of the establishment. They bore me.


5 posted on 03/24/2014 9:53:26 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: ifinnegan

So conservatives are not supposed to be fans of rock music? I guess I don’t get your point.


6 posted on 03/24/2014 9:54:37 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: ClearCase_guy

Exactly, even if The Clash were bigtime lefties, their lyrics were such that anyone with a streak of rebelliousness could relate to them, be it on the Left or Right.

The song “Working for the Clampdown” is a perfect example....

What are we gonna do now?
Taking off his turban, they said, is this man a Jew?
’Cos working for the clampdown
They put up a poster saying we earn more than you!
When we’re working for the clampdown
We will teach our twisted speech
To the young believers
We will train our blue-eyed men
To be young believers

The judge said five to ten but I say double that again
I’m not working for the clampdown
No man born with a living soul
Can be working for the clampdown
Kick over the wall ‘cause government’s to fall
How can you refuse it?
Let fury have the hour, anger can be power
D’you know that you can use it?

The voices in your head are calling
Stop wasting your time, there’s nothing coming
Only a fool would think someone could save you
The men at the factory are old and cunning
You don’t owe nothing, so boy get runnin’
It’s the best years of your life they want to steal

But, you grow up and you calm down and
You’re working for the clampdown
You start wearing the blue and brown and
You’re working for the clampdown
So you got someone to boss around
It makes you feel big now
You drift until you brutalize
You made your first kill now

In these days of evil presidentes
Working for the clampdown
But lately one or two has fully paid their due
For working for the clampdown
Ha! Gitalong! Gitalong!
Working for the clampdown
Ha! Gitalong! Gitalong!
Working for the clampdown

Yeah I’m working hard in Harrisburg
Working hard in Petersburg
Working for the clampdown
Working for the clampdown
Ha! Gitalong! Gitalong
Begging to be melted down
Gitalong, gitalong
Work
Work
And I give away no secrets – ha!
Work
More work
Work
Work


7 posted on 03/24/2014 9:58:32 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Kaslin

“Mommies alright, daddies alright, they just seem a little weird ...”


8 posted on 03/24/2014 9:59:03 AM PDT by 11th_VA (Decrimminalize Tax Evasion)
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To: atc23

Very cool someone else saw the Who in the early days. I saw them perform at a small venue in Lake Geneva Wisconsin. They destroyed their guitars on stage at the end of the show.


9 posted on 03/24/2014 10:00:48 AM PDT by UB355 (Slower traffic keep rigsupreme Splasht)
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To: SamAdams76

Not bad rock music.

Sam Sham, of this he mentioned are legit.

But, it is not about being a fan of rock music or not. It’s about buying in to and accepting, still to this day, the liberal ethos that was generated at that time.

No one with a brain should worship at the altar of the 60’s hippie scene

The music wasn’t that good and the self mythologizing was and is over the top.

He’s an old man now and should give up his rosy eyed view of the 60s.

When I was young I liked rock more than I do now (I’m younger than the writer), but over time we grow up and find out there are so many things better.


10 posted on 03/24/2014 10:04:13 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: ifinnegan

“...His little walk down memory lane well illustrates the emptiness of the baby boomer lives and indicates one reason we are in this mess.”

Seriously? What do you know about baby boomer lives? Are you one? I’m guessing not.


11 posted on 03/24/2014 10:05:01 AM PDT by beelzepug (if any alphabets are watchin', I'll be coming home right after the meetin')
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To: dfwgator

Joe Strummer had passion. With passion, you can be misguided but you can’t be part of the sheeple. We have too many sheep now.


12 posted on 03/24/2014 10:07:02 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: dfwgator

Clampdown is not one of their best songs.

Clash were great and their music holds up (not all songs).

Unlike the boring music mentioned in the article.

The worst music was from these hippies of the 60 s it was also pure statism fall in line with the groupthink.

Media still uses it to this day to pacify the populace.


13 posted on 03/24/2014 10:07:52 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: Kaslin
The war was brought to a terrifically awkward end

And why, pray tell, was that??? Could it have possibly been the 'Rat Congress of 1974, which started the grand 'Rat tradition of backstabbing of American allies for politically expedient reasons?

The Vietnam War was essentially won when the Paris peace accords were signed: the South Vietnamese were promised continued military assistance following the withdrawal of US troops. Thanks to the 'Rats, that lifeline was pulled and in less than 2 years, the Communists marched into Saigon while American helicopters evacuated the US Embassy.

And the tradition continues to this day with the lack of a status-of-forces agreement before the Iraq withdrawal and a timetable for Afghanistan withdrawal that Taliban forces have penciled in on their calendars.

FUBO and FAD!

14 posted on 03/24/2014 10:08:36 AM PDT by bassmaner (Hey commies: I am a white male, and I am guilty of NOTHING! Sell your 'white guilt' elsewhere.)
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To: ifinnegan

It’s always been one of my favorites by them.


15 posted on 03/24/2014 10:09:16 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: beelzepug
"His little walk down memory lane well illustrates...

You might also add the illustration of the realization of pending mortality for those of that generation. The vigor of one's lost youth versus the reality of the infirmities of today. Repeating the County Joe quote from earlier in the thread: "Whoopie, we're all going to die!"

16 posted on 03/24/2014 10:12:31 AM PDT by buckalfa (Tilting at Windmills)
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To: beelzepug

Seriously.

That even a writer at a supposedly conservative site would spew such nostalgic emptiness means we are in bad shape and helps explains the spineless RINO phenomenon.

Garbage in garbage out and the ethos associated with “The 60’s” that he buys in to is garbage, empty at best, liberal leftist in longterm effect.

It’s not about the music, per se, but the ethos surrounding it.


17 posted on 03/24/2014 10:13:35 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: Kaslin

He missed out on something important: where the music came from in the first place.

After WWII, there was enormous growth in suburbia, especially around the new western cities. Very family friendly places, they were also intensely boring. The few recreations were things like drive-in movie theaters. But they had one big thing.

Instruments and music. All public schools had music programs, and at least a basic introduction to music for anyone who wanted it. Musical instruments were relatively cheap enough for most families to afford, and so the logical outgrowth were garage bands.

There wasn’t much of a local music scene, so young people had to go to the coasts if they were to have a chance at success. And the competition was fierce. Successful groups had to practice all day and perform for much of the night, in any venue they could get, to make a name for themselves.

And if you weren’t practicing or performing, they were listening to other groups.

95% of them never went anywhere, and 3-4% of the rest were one hit wonders, with only 1-2% getting any degree of mid-term success.

There is an Internet free streaming audio website that plays a lot of the “also-rans” of the time, as well as some of the commercials aired back them, and it is fun to listen to.

http://www.beyondthebeatgeneration.com/


18 posted on 03/24/2014 10:14:16 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (WoT News: Rantburg.com)
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To: Kaslin

I believe his account of Kent State has been seriously challenged, if not discredited—as in the Guard Soldiers were fired upon and they returned fire.


19 posted on 03/24/2014 10:16:49 AM PDT by Future Snake Eater (CrossFit.com)
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To: dfwgator

I liked it when it came out. It seemed hard hitting. But musically I think it’s weak.

Now I more appreciate Brand New Cadillac (a cover) and Jimmy Jazz.

I think London Calling and Clampdown both share the same sort of weakness in that they aren’t all that melodic. Same with Koka Kola on another side.

Just my opinions, of course.


20 posted on 03/24/2014 10:18:15 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: Kaslin

like the title of Elmer Keith’s book

“Hell, I Was There.”

Not going to apologize for my excesses back from ‘68 through the early 70s...but a lot of the music was GREAT.

in concert in those times saw Zeppelin, Cream, The Stones, Procol Harum, The Byrds, the Dead, The Who, Janis Joplin(with and without Big Brother), The Band, Jefferson Airplane, Alvin Lee and TYA, Ray Charles, Randy Newman, Sly and the family Stone, Mothers of Invention, Blood Sweat and Tears.

there are more I cant remember...

but much of the music was GREAT.(and like all eras, much was crap.)
I reformed my excesses way back when....but I still love much of the music....


21 posted on 03/24/2014 10:20:07 AM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: buckalfa

The contemptuous Joe McDonald meant by “whoopee were all going to die” that we were all going to die in Vietnam.

So don’t go, don’t fight communisms is fine, America is bad etc.....


22 posted on 03/24/2014 10:20:49 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Good analysis.

Then the drugs came and these kids became degenerate.


23 posted on 03/24/2014 10:22:17 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Then the young hipsters became the record execs and music went downhill.

Zappa was right when he said they were better off with the old guys with cigars going, “Who knows what it is? Let’s give it a shot and see if it sells.”


24 posted on 03/24/2014 10:24:57 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Vaquero

Excepting Ray Charles (rather out of place for that list), Sly, Joplin — those artists were horrible, with exceptions for some good songs.

They were boring. They were well produced and sound good, but ultimately empty and dull and, metaphorically, non-nutritious.

Thinking this is somehow the best music, classic, or even all that good, is the mythology and ethos I am talking about.

It is commensurate and part and parcel of the liberal immoral ethos that has descended on our society.


25 posted on 03/24/2014 10:27:20 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: Kaslin

It was a magic time. If you weren’t part of it, you will never understand. And I could care less. Enjoy your gaga.


26 posted on 03/24/2014 10:27:41 AM PDT by bigbob (The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly. Abraham Lincoln)
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To: ifinnegan
but over time we grow up and find out there are so many things better

I grew up in the 80s. Hair Metal ruled the day. Guys with bigger hair than the girls, and more lipstick and mascara, as well.

Thankfully, I grew up and got over it. A Committed Marriage, Job, Kids, House, etc etc etc do that to you. The author of the piece should do the same, rather than wistfully pining over selective memories of a long ago and best forgotten era. :-) How's that for cynical? :-) :-)

And, FWIW, "Kiss" and "Def Leppard" are coming out on tour soon. This weekend, Mrs WBill said "I know that you liked both those groups. Interested in tickets?"

"Nah."

Besides, I saw them back in the day, with their original lineups. Now, all they are is a lead singer, one other member, and a buncha guys who know how to play their hits.

27 posted on 03/24/2014 10:27:42 AM PDT by wbill
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To: 11th_VA

“Mommies alright, daddies alright, they just seem a little weird ...”

Great song. And, one of my all time favorite albums (live that is). The studio version of the songs on the live album aren’t near as good.

As to the music scene today, it reflects society in general, as I believe it always has. From rock (at least that’s what they call it) to rap, in my opinion most of it is crap.


28 posted on 03/24/2014 10:29:35 AM PDT by mark3681
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To: Kaslin

29 posted on 03/24/2014 10:30:44 AM PDT by Hoodat (Democrats - Opposing Equal Protection since 1828)
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To: dfwgator
The Clash were sold as lefties in rebellion against Dame Thatcher's reforms. But I wonder:

Career Opportunities

"The offered me the office, offered me the shop
They said I'd better take anything they'd got
Do you wanna make tea at the BBC?
Do you wanna be, do you really wanna be a cop?
Career opportunities are the ones that never knocked
Every job they offer you is to keep you out the dock...

What "dock" are they referring to? Was it the union controlled ports, or the welfare roles? It might be the first of these and the song may be refer to a stratified union economy and welfare state.

30 posted on 03/24/2014 10:31:04 AM PDT by tsomer
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To: mark3681
“Mommies alright, daddies alright, they just seem a little weird ...” Great song. And, one of my all time favorite albums (live that is). The studio version of the songs on the live album aren’t near as good.

Rick Nielsen is a big-time conservative from what I hear.

31 posted on 03/24/2014 10:32:25 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: ifinnegan
Then the drugs came

My Dad graduated from college in the mid 60s. Not only did he never use drugs, he didn't even *know* anyone who had used them. (Beer, however, was a whole 'nother story.....)

Contrast that with his siblings who graduated in the late 60s and early 70s.

Or, with myself. Even counting myself as "One", I'd still have a hard time filling up one hand with the number of people I knew in college who *hadn't* tried something illicit.

32 posted on 03/24/2014 10:33:39 AM PDT by wbill
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To: wbill

What’s the saying, “If you remember the 60s, you weren’t there.”


33 posted on 03/24/2014 10:34:09 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: wbill

Hair Metal was so much worse. ack.

Those guys were more my contemporaries.

I did not listen to it. I know the 60’s music, but not that. I find it disconcerting to hear songs from thus era, these bands on the oldies or jack format stations.

These are the first I’ve ever really heard the songs.

I see why it was popular. They recycled the best punk licks and riffs in a package that, for some reason was safe and comfortable to the American consumer.

Punk was not played on radio, not signed to major labels not commercial, not heard.

But these guys recycled it and in that manner it got heard, although not neatly as good as the original.


34 posted on 03/24/2014 10:36:36 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: tsomer
Every job they offer you is to keep you out the dock...

The "Dock" referred to is the court system, I think.

From dictionary.com....noun: place in a courtroom where a prisoner is placed during trial.

idiom: in the dock, being tried in a court, especially a criminal court; on trial.

35 posted on 03/24/2014 10:39:08 AM PDT by wbill
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To: dfwgator

Rick Nielsen is a big-time conservative from what I hear. “

I have heard that as well. And, he’s one hell of a guitar player.
Saw them in Towson, MD years ago. Great showmen, great show.


36 posted on 03/24/2014 10:39:36 AM PDT by mark3681
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To: wbill

Yeah.

By the time I graduated HS in the late 70’s, dope smoking, coke etc... Were ubiquitous as was Led Zep and Pink Floyd worship.

It was the 70’s where the pioneers, that this writer looks back at nostalgically, had finally made their influence widespread and mainstream.


37 posted on 03/24/2014 10:42:49 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Most of us forget, as we walk down the 60’s memory lane, that the music was produced by liberals and against the decency of conservatism. It’s what led to today’s mentality of disgust, which many of us post about today.

One fine example is John Lennon’s song. “Imagine”.
Some of the lyrics say things like:

Imagine there’s no heaven
It’s easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people living for today

So, Lennon wants us to think that without religion, we can have decency and morality? Well, since everybody now has ‘’their own’’ morality, then stealing is OK, adultry is OK, blocking the god given right of people to exercise judeo/christianity is OK. He doesn’t want any consequences to be thought of in advance..it doesn’t matter what you do. Trust is gone, integrity is gone.

Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people living life in peace

There goes national soverignity, opening the door to a one world tyranny over all nations. Nothing to kill or die for also means that freedom is meaningless and not worth dying for. If there’s nothing to die for, then what is there to live for? This isn’t a life of peace, this is a life of apathy. Destruction of passion is followed by the dark ages of lack of creativity, and innovation.

If no doesn’t mean no, then what does your ‘yes’ mean?

So even though we enjoy the memory lane of music to a time when we were young and actually rather innocent, it was a time of ‘’ free love’’ and now we have AIDS.

Yes, our musicians appealed to a liberal perspective at the time, and the consequences are now here, and we find we don’t like them. It’s killing us. You can’t even go to the doctor on your own dollar anymore. That’s Peace??? six feet under maybe but that’s not life.


38 posted on 03/24/2014 10:42:59 AM PDT by PrairieLady2
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To: PrairieLady2

There are some who suggest that at the time of his death, Lennon was reconsidering his previous stances, and they’ve even gone so far to suggest that he was a fan of Reagan.


39 posted on 03/24/2014 10:44:53 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: buckalfa; ifinnegan

Pending mortality, indeed. As one who has had a stroke and whose wife recently had a heart attack, I’m keenly aware of my mortality. Of course, I was also aware of it when VC rockets were in-coming at 2 a.m.

I know it wasn’t the same for everybody but for me, growing up in the fifties and sixties as an average white kid whose dad was an auto mechanic and whose mom was a homemaker, life was pretty damn good. I wonder what things are in store for my sons, and now my grand children, with the clouds of fear and uncertainty hanging over their futures? If I had come home in 1968 to the U.S. I see today, I’d have thought the plane had taken a wrong turn into the Twilight Zone.


40 posted on 03/24/2014 10:45:09 AM PDT by beelzepug (if any alphabets are watchin', I'll be coming home right after the meetin')
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To: ifinnegan
in concert...the two you mentioned...Sly put on the best show live I have ever seen....that was at Woodstock in 69(did not expect to like Sly in concert but he Wowed the crowd.)

also saw Joplin at Woodstock...she was ‘ok’ there with her new band. saw her a year earlier in a small venue with Big Brother and she was GREAT. I was right up at the stage...incredible.

The Cleanest music performed was The Band.

and the blues of ‘Cream’ at the Spectrum in Philly in '68 was phenomenal...

Saw the Stones 3 times 69, 89 and 99 and each time was better than the last.

forgot Billy Joel....he puts on a great show.

It is commensurate and part and parcel of the liberal immoral ethos that has descended on our society.

Back in the day, I was wild and did what I pleased.

haven't since the early-mid 70s.....still love much of the music....and I am not going to apologize for any of it, to you or anyone else.

41 posted on 03/24/2014 10:47:35 AM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Kaslin

While the anger of late 60s/ early 70s music did make for a lot of great music it didn’t make for any societal change. There was one of those Ken Burns-esque documentaries on the history of rock where PJ O’Rourke chided a generation of musician that ignored the fact that no one with their job had ever remade society before apparently thinking that because their instruments plugged in things would go differently. So it’s not really a surprise that most people in music by the 80s and beyond have given up on that whole “changing the world” thing, they now know it’s a job, they make entertainment, and while they can occasionally get something off their chest the rabble shall not be roused.


42 posted on 03/24/2014 10:50:37 AM PDT by discostu (Call it collect, call it direct, call it TODAY!)
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To: Hoodat

43 posted on 03/24/2014 10:51:10 AM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Vaquero

Excellent post!!!


44 posted on 03/24/2014 10:52:47 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: Vaquero

Band were pretty good.

They were always called rock, but I hear them and they were country.

“...still love much of the music....and I am not going to apologize for any of it, to you or anyone else.”

You’re a rebel, Johnny. When are you ever going to be tamed...?


45 posted on 03/24/2014 10:53:15 AM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: tsomer
What "dock" are they referring to? Was it the union controlled ports, or the welfare roles?

No. The dock they're referring to is the defendant's dock in court. They're saying that society offers dead end jobs to keep people from becoming criminals.

I've always thought the Clash's best conservative line was "If you find an Afghan rebel that the Moscow bullets missed, ask him what he thinks of voting Communist. Ask the Dalai Lama in the hills of Tibet, how many monks did the Chinese get?"

46 posted on 03/24/2014 10:53:53 AM PDT by Bubba Ho-Tep ("More weight!"--Giles Corey)
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To: Kaslin

The great music from the 60’s and early 70’s was great because it was alright to join a band and create music. Thus, there were thousands of bands and many were quite good. Nowadays you seldom hear of kids forming a band and trying to make a go out of it wo thus with little supply there are less decent bands.


47 posted on 03/24/2014 10:56:01 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: discostu

-— While the anger of late 60s/ early 70s music did make for a lot of great music it didn’t make for any societal change -—

I couldn’t disagree more. The sixties represented a fundamental transformation of moral norms. Music played an enormous role in desensitization to and normalization of libertinism.


48 posted on 03/24/2014 10:56:28 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
And the competition was fierce. Successful groups had to practice all day and perform for much of the night, in any venue they could get, to make a name for themselves. And if you weren’t practicing or performing, they were listening to other groups.

Exactly, it was a BIG industry.

49 posted on 03/24/2014 10:58:02 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: Kaslin

Well....all I know is “there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues.” Now I got to get my “mudshark dancing lesson”. I was there in the 60’s, and yes I do remember...at least most of it. The 60s and early 70s, best rock ever recorded. “Rockin’ the Filmore”, Johhny Winter And Live”, “Full House”, and on and on. I still have all the vinyl. Kick out the jams mother......


50 posted on 03/24/2014 10:59:24 AM PDT by W.Lee (After the first one, the rest are free.)
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