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What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder?
National Institute of Mental Health ^ | Saturday, March 29, 2014 | NIH Staff

Posted on 03/29/2014 6:42:23 AM PDT by Star Traveler

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To: ClearCase_guy
"I would have described them as (at least somewhat) having Aspergers. Poor social skills, unusual focus, obsession with details that seem unimportant to anyone else, very little flexibility in how things are done. Properly managed, these traits can be pretty useful."

I believe the show "Big Bang Theory" was based in no small part to people with exactly those traits undiagnosed.

51 posted on 03/29/2014 7:49:10 AM PDT by Abathar (Proudly posting without reading the article carefully since 2004)
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To: Texas Fossil
The very first Autistic student that I worked with as a one on one aide was very smart. He is high functioning and over the years learned how to deescalate before his anger got out of control. He also thought using any kind of technology was "cheating" so he didn't want to use a computer.

On the other hand, he was brilliant. I know that someday I will read about how he has invented something wonderful! A very neat kid!

52 posted on 03/29/2014 7:49:51 AM PDT by CAluvdubya (Molon Labe)
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To: Star Traveler

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/index.html


53 posted on 03/29/2014 7:51:20 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Alberta's Child

Agreed. A goal in science is to classify everything in order for it to be modeled. Clusters of data points must indicate something. And those clusters farther away from what is decided to be the normal, need to be “fixed”, when in fact the act of “fixing” may do more harm then natural progression through life stages. Simply because one child may behave a little differently, e.g., is more quiet, does not mean there is a problem. So now it seems that the ASD “spectrum” can be expanded to cover far too many behavioral “oddities”. This is not to say that some behaviors shouldn’t be monitored, but let’s not be so quick to pull kids into the ASD class.


54 posted on 03/29/2014 7:54:07 AM PDT by SgtHooper (If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.)
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To: formosa

This reminds me of the autistic kid who who can make a shot from anywhere on a basketball court but they can’t let him play because if an opposing player asks him for the ball, he gives it to them.


55 posted on 03/29/2014 7:55:31 AM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: muggs

I just looked it up and think this is the person you’re talking about ...

Carly’s Voice - Changing the World of Autism
http://carlysvoice.com/home/aboutcarly/

My name is Carly Fleischmann and as long as I can remember I’ve been diagnosed with autism.

I am not able to talk out of my mouth, however I have found another way to communicate by spelling on my computer. (and yes that is me typing on the computer by myself)

I used to think I was the only kid with autism who communicates by spelling but last year I met a group of kids that communicate the same way. In fact some are even faster at typing then I am.

Last year a story about my life was shown on ABC news, CNN and CTV here in Canada.

After my story was played I kept on getting lots of emails from moms, dads, kids and people from different countries asking me all sorts of questions about autism. I think people get a lot of their information from so-called experts but I think what happens is that experts can’t give an explanation to certain questions. How can you explain something you have not lived or if you don’t know what it’s like to have it? If a horse is sick, you don’t ask a fish what’s wrong with the horse. You go right to the horse’s mouth.


56 posted on 03/29/2014 7:55:52 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: ClearCase_guy
Yes that is the case with my grand son. It keeps us all awake at night, scared for his future when we are all gone. My husband and I are spending money to help that we will need for our retirement and his mom and dad are struggling to make ends meet. My son works full time, works on designing web sites when he gets home and basically does most of the housework because his wife is disabled. It is totally exhausting and no, they get no help from the government other than a scholarship that the state of Ohio gives to everyone that decides not to send their autistic children to public school. The public schools would be required to educate him if they didn't take the scholarship and it would probably cost tax payers more to have him educated in the public schools and the education would not be as good.
57 posted on 03/29/2014 7:56:56 AM PDT by muggs (Hope and Change = Hoax and Chains)
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To: CAluvdubya

Almost all Asperger’s sufferers have some level of OCD.

Out at UCLA there is a Dr. Jeffery Schwartz who specializes in OCD. He wrote a very good book called:

“The Mind & The Brain: Neuroplasticity and the Power of Mental Force”

ISBN 0-06-039355-6

That book explains how some of the traits can be “outgrown”. He uses physical disability to illustrate the way the mind can be re-wired.

It is an excellent read. You can probably find it in a decent local library.


58 posted on 03/29/2014 7:58:51 AM PDT by Texas Fossil (Texas is not where you were born, but a Free State of Heart, Mind & Attitude!)
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To: Star Traveler

Has anyone run into this?

In talking about our boy and if it comes up in the conversation some way, we may say that he’s autistic. Then the other person says something like ... “Oh, that’s cool! I’m ‘artistic’ too.”

... LOL ...


59 posted on 03/29/2014 8:01:19 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Star Traveler

I took 2 courses in “Language for the Deaf” in college from a woman whose parents were deaf. She had some interesting stories...I assume you do as well. :)


60 posted on 03/29/2014 8:03:10 AM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: formosa
We took my grand son to the indoor playground last Sunday. He will be 4 in May, he made his 2nd attempt ever to reach out to another child and the brat told him ewwwh, stay away from me. It broke my heart and I cried all day.
61 posted on 03/29/2014 8:04:12 AM PDT by muggs (Hope and Change = Hoax and Chains)
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To: Texas Fossil

I have read some of the reasons why in several articles and threads, have been in discussions with people who have been in the disability ministries for decades and others who have children with Asperger’s or autism or have either one. Almost all agree with me and see it as more harmful than good to include Asperger’s. The articles tend to make me cross-eyed if they aren’t coming from people who live their lives with or as Autistic or Asperger’s.


62 posted on 03/29/2014 8:05:01 AM PDT by lupie
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To: Star Traveler
My nieces son was diagnosed with autism then later Aspergers at 5. We all could see something was different. As early as a year he was obsessed with certain things like the spinning of ceiling fans, spinning things, repetitive things....he would stare for hours if he could. When he was 7 he started taking these things apart, getting himself in trouble. He promised to put things back together, so my niece was game, curious if he could do it. He did. Today he takes things apart that are broken and tells her what needs to be replaced. He's 12 now and really smart, but has outburst, but not as many as he previously had. Mom has learned how to handle them and has him calmed normally inside a minute. He is an amazing artist. He paints all the time and the ones I like are the ones that look 3 dimensional. Mom thinks his Aspergers came from vaccines. They can't find it in either side of the family going back 3 generations. He's a sweet kid; intense and passionate.
63 posted on 03/29/2014 8:07:56 AM PDT by Linda Frances (Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness.)
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To: lonestar

Yeah ... the one that comes to mind right now is when my parents were told (by note) to come down to school to the principal’s office to discuss some trouble I got into. Since I was the interpreter for the family (the only child at that time, a brother came along later) ... I was the only one who could enable the conversation between the two. I did my best to keep myself out of trouble in that conversation ... :-) ...


64 posted on 03/29/2014 8:11:40 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Star Traveler

The thing I remember most about Temple Grandin is that she is an expert on designing cattle yards...or, those things they run cattle thru. I forget what they are called...cattle shoots?


65 posted on 03/29/2014 8:13:12 AM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: Star Traveler; Kartographer; B4Ranch; JRandomFreeper; Old Sarge; greeneyes; sockmonkey; Dacula; ...
I'm writing about this and will post it when I have finished it. Those who are reading this, check back later today, maybe one or two hours from now. I was a psychological examiner for many years and tested children who had “actual” autism disorder. Highly intelligent people in the past have been suspected of having Asperger’s and, highly intelligent people today are incorrectly thought to have Asperger’s, which such symptoms have now been folded into Autism Spectrum Disorder in the DSM V.
66 posted on 03/29/2014 8:13:20 AM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: muggs

So sorry you had to go through that. I would not wish it on anyone. Small children can be really cruel. It will get better as he grows up. I think it is more painful for adults sometimes than the children. They tend to bounce back more quickly.


67 posted on 03/29/2014 8:14:34 AM PDT by formosa
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To: Texas Fossil

I’m familiar with Dr Grandin’s work—have read her books. She is wonderful. She is also atypical for autistic people.

I was wondering more about the blessings of Asperger’s, which my friend has, than autism. It can be sort of exasperating.


68 posted on 03/29/2014 8:14:40 AM PDT by ottbmare (the OTTB mare, now a proud Marine Mom)
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To: lonestar
cattle shoots

That hardly seems sporting!

69 posted on 03/29/2014 8:15:22 AM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: Linda Frances

Ours is fascinated with fans and their spinning. He spins himself too. He also has a very very sweet personality and disposition. The only thing he would run into a problem with, in terms of the category of Aspergers, is that he doesn’t speak and I’m told that this one thing does not fit into Aspergers.


70 posted on 03/29/2014 8:15:24 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: lonestar

Yep ... that and Autism is what she’s known for.


71 posted on 03/29/2014 8:17:07 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Star Traveler
Yes that's her. Since reading her book I have never said anything in front of my grand son that I didn't want him to know because I realize he understands everything. He now has an I-Pad and uses it to communicate.
72 posted on 03/29/2014 8:19:08 AM PDT by muggs (Hope and Change = Hoax and Chains)
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To: Linda Frances

There are a lot of people like him and always have been, don’t let the irritating modern fixation upon making a pathology out of every behavior that doesn’t march lockstep within some predetermined range convince you otherwise. He’ll be OK, just find an outlet for him to vent his frustrations that is less visible and less disconcerting to others, and encourage him in his fascinations that can lead to a productive life in adulthood. Time was, this was called creative temperament or eccentric genius and almost expected of those with rare ability. Now, it’s just another way for public schools to get more money, and just another way for psychologists and pharmaceutical companies to sell more drugs. Avoid them if at all possible, imho.


73 posted on 03/29/2014 8:20:26 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: muggs

You bet ... just because he’s not speaking doesn’t mean he doesn’t know what you’re saying.


74 posted on 03/29/2014 8:21:18 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Star Traveler

So I read the NIH website on this, and am stunned at the “spectrum” of inconsistencies and unknowns. Perhaps 5-10% of the content may actually be useful in detecting autism—the rest is leave-it-up-to-the doctor (and parents) to guess if the child has autism. What is clear to me from that content; when I was growing up, I remember seeing most of those characteristics in kids around me—lack of eye content (I call shyness), repetitive movements, lack of social interaction (shyness again). I was very shy at those early ages, and not social like the rest of the kids. So what. So rather than let children nowadays progress in their own way, the government set forth guidelines to identify all those kids who “should” be more normal. Again, autism is real. And many of you say there are real noticeable changes in kids theses days. But the guidelines need to far more definitive than what currently exists.


75 posted on 03/29/2014 8:21:49 AM PDT by SgtHooper (If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you.)
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To: Linda Frances
My son loved to take things apart, look at them, and put them back together, He saved him money for a long time and bought his 1st decent computer, a Gateway. He was probably only 12 -13. One day he decided to take it apart. He discovered it did not contain all the upgraded he had paid for. He was furious and Gateway sent him the correct stuff. Since they, he builds his own from scratch.
76 posted on 03/29/2014 8:26:10 AM PDT by muggs (Hope and Change = Hoax and Chains)
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To: Star Traveler

LOL


77 posted on 03/29/2014 8:27:08 AM PDT by muggs (Hope and Change = Hoax and Chains)
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To: Star Traveler

Grand son loved spinning. Since we bought him a trampoline for our house and his house, he now jumps and seldom spins any more.


78 posted on 03/29/2014 8:30:35 AM PDT by muggs (Hope and Change = Hoax and Chains)
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To: Boundless
About the wheat situation. I've switched to 100% whole grains. I don't eat anything with added gluten or corn syrup. I no longer have a problem with gluten. I'm wondering if the gluten in overprocced grains and the added gluten are the primary part of the problem.

Another thing I wonder about is if constantly staring at technology, flourescent lights and the absence of natural sunlight don't contribute significantly to the problem.

79 posted on 03/29/2014 8:32:48 AM PDT by grania
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To: lupie

Yes, I agree. I am weary of the confidence of the Psychiatry Profession and their confidence they can help with issues of the mind.

I have greater confidence in those who use therapy to treat OCD. I believe in neuroplasticity. The mind can be conditioned to be rewired.


80 posted on 03/29/2014 8:37:14 AM PDT by Texas Fossil (Texas is not where you were born, but a Free State of Heart, Mind & Attitude!)
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To: ilovesarah2012

> Why does it affect boys at such a high rate?

That’s a very good question, and one I couldn’t immediately find any leads on. I suspect it just part of the wider question of how boys and girls are different.

Looking at the various papers below and linked from
http://www.drperlmutter.com/learn/studies/
none of them address the question of why this affects males more than females.


81 posted on 03/29/2014 8:41:16 AM PDT by Boundless (Survive Obamacare by not needing it.)
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To: Star Traveler

autism later


82 posted on 03/29/2014 8:46:44 AM PDT by quintr
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To: ClearCase_guy
People with Autism will always need care.

Yes I have a son who is 21. He will never drive a car or obtain employment and will need support for the rest of his life.

We and many other families simply don't know what to do when we are to old to care for them. The idea of shipping him off to some group home fills me with dread.

The state, local and federal programs work about as well as ObamaCare.

I just don't want him to end up living under some overpass.

I just don't know what we are going to do. As of now there are no good options and the prospects are bleak.

They still don't know what causes it or how to effectively treat it. All the medical docs can do is throw different meds at him.

83 posted on 03/29/2014 9:03:44 AM PDT by usurper (Liberals GET OFF MY LAWN)
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Bmkflr


84 posted on 03/29/2014 9:08:26 AM PDT by moose07 (the truth will out ,one day.)
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To: usurper
I'm sorry for your troubles.

I do wish that society would approach some things differently. I can imagine something like an almshouse where people could go and be cared for. Food, a bed, some simple level of care. It's better than living under an overpass.

Unfortunately, many people feel that a sparkling hospital setting, with a big, highly-trained staff, lots of equipment and lots of expensive medication is the only way to go. And then it's either "We're taking everyone's money in order to pay for this" or else "We just can't afford to help you".

I'd like to see some sort of middle ground where people can just be looked after. But that almost seems illegal these days in which the only acceptable solutions are Big Government solutions.

85 posted on 03/29/2014 9:13:51 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: Star Traveler
It’s more easily observed. Do a quick search for “Autism” on Free Republic and look at two threads from just the last couple of days. As you read the various posters, you’ll see the ones mentioned here.

You wrote the quote "(1) those who are totally ignorant of the subject and what is going on, and post from their IGNORANCE, and/or post solely from an "agenda" or political motive -- and " and so I am trying to find out what your position is. If you choose not to clarify YOUR position then I still will have no idea what you are referencing.

86 posted on 03/29/2014 9:40:18 AM PDT by raybbr (Obamacare needs a death panel.)
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To: Alberta's Child
As a result, there's no question in my mind that lot of what has been diagnosed as a "disorder" is really nothing more than normal variations in human behavior and psychological makeup.

Of course, there's no money in that...

87 posted on 03/29/2014 9:45:12 AM PDT by raybbr (Obamacare needs a death panel.)
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To: Boundless
Over the last half century, the following issues have crept into diet, and are rising (as are the trend lines for a distressing number of ailments, including ASD):

Yes, possibly. I have an oldest daughter with Asperger's and two children who do NOT have it, so this diet issue must affect one and not the others? They all have the same diet.

When one child walks around the perimeter of the playground over and over again ... I could go on and on. We started homeschooling after first grade. She's also gifted.

One thing that intrigues me is gut bacteria. My oldest daughter was slammed with Roseola when she was a year old. It made her eyes bug out (I think one is damaged to this day) and caused a high fever spike. She had a round of antibiotics for that and then later two more rounds for ear infections.

I WISH I'd known then what I know now about probiotics. The poor child was never given any. :-( I did give them children's yogurt, but that's about it.

Now, many parents are giving their children probiotics regularly.

Psychologists are starting to treat anxiety, depression, and OCD with probiotics.

88 posted on 03/29/2014 9:45:28 AM PDT by agrarianlady
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To: raybbr

It was meant only in the framework, “if the shoe fits, wear it” - otherwise “forget it” ...

If you don’t think the shoe fits ... forget it ... :-) ...

THEN ... you can discuss with the others here who deal with their own Autism issues and offer information that may help them with their ASD kids, or even learn something new from these Freepers who are dealing with it everyday.


89 posted on 03/29/2014 9:49:35 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Alberta's Child

And are Eric Holder and Chris Christie going to bust up these criminal schemes? No, of course not.


90 posted on 03/29/2014 9:52:36 AM PDT by darkangel82
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To: Boundless

What about soy formula?


91 posted on 03/29/2014 9:56:34 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: Boundless

I have a son with Asperger’s and I’ll tell you exactly why there are more diagnoses now than in the past.

Before the era of no hit, no taunt discipline, either parents, siblings or school mates of the milder cases would beat, berate, belittle or otherwise coerce a suppression of the ‘aberrant’ behaviors.

I know from personal experience that high functioning kids can learn how to internalize or rechannel their behavior dramatically under these conditions.

We are sheltering our son as best we can, and trying to help him steer his choices rather than dictate them to him. We see glimpses from time to time that he understands he is going to need to learn how to find a niche in larger society. I hate that there are no easy answers to any of this.


92 posted on 03/29/2014 10:13:54 AM PDT by Go_Raiders (Freedom doesn't give you the right to take from others, no matter how innocent your program sounds.)
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To: Texas Fossil

Autism Spectrum Disorder

In order to be diagnosed with a mental disorder, the patient must be tested by a qualified psychological examiner. A family doctor might suspect a mental disorder, but cannot give a legal diagnosis of a mental disorder. Also, one symptom included in a mental disorder cannot be used to make a diagnosis as there are a number of qualifiers (symptoms) required before a diagnosis can be given.

People are different. We can say “most” people react “this way” to “x” but we can’t say a person who doesn’t act that way, is defective (however some are labeled anyway). Some people are outside that norm, and highly intelligent people is one group who frequently are outside the norm. These people tend to have an IQ of over 130. They are usually in the 99 percentile which would be in the area of 140 IQ and up. That means they are smarter than 99 people out of 100. That means one person out of 100 would be able to well follow and understand that brilliant person. As a result, people would tend to not include that brilliant person in their group of friends – and that tends to isolate the brilliant person. If we slapped a label on this brilliant person due to “his/her” lack of social interaction, we would be wrong. The group of people are the ones who isolated the brilliant person, the brilliant person did not intentionally isolate him/herself.

Why a brilliant person sometimes, or most of the time, intentionally socially isolates him/herself:

This person thinks at a very high level and his/her brain likely is always working on problems and solutions to problems, creating diagrams, building objects, working on changing how something works, creating poetry, developing and studying intense math problems, figuring out how one chemical reacts with another chemical, etc.. This interests this person so much, they keep working mentally and physically most of the time. This work is not work to them – it is their relaxation and their joy to create. They are marvelously different than others. We have a tendency to label someone as “weird” if he/she doesn’t fit into the mainstream. So, we develop a label and stick it on that person for being different. These different people have enriched our world with great accomplishments.

Here is a list of some people suspected to have Asperger’s (Asperger’s no longer exists in the DSM V, so these people would now be suspected of having the new label of Autism Spectrum Disorder). As you read these names, consider what they have in common: Abraham Lincoln, Albert Einstein, Alexander Graham Bell, Benjamin Franklin, Carl Jung, Emily Dickinson, George Bernard Shaw, George Washington, Henry Ford, Henry Thoreau, Isaac Newton, Jane Austen, Ludwig van Beethoven, Mark Twain, Michelangelo, Richard Strauss, Thomas Edison, Thomas Jefferson, Vincent Van Gogh, Alfred Hitchcock, Hans Asperger (Austrian pediatric doctor after whom Asperger’s Syndrome is named), Isaac Asimov.

These brilliant people were intensely concentrating on solving problems and creating, and how they did create! But, hey, they were different and missed social gatherings, likely had few friends except those who understood what they were doing. They could not relate to the vast group of “normal” people because they were different. I suspect normal people stayed away from them on purpose, too. If all they were going to talk about was some weird thing like a light in a bulb instead of an oil lamp or gas light, who would want to be around that? And, what about why something falls down instead of going up – stay away from that nut case, Isaac Newton.

Who wants to visit that nut case woman who constantly write words that rhyme – I’m not having tea with Jane Austen, ‘cause she is touched in the head. There is a guy who lives in the next block, and all he does is write math numbers and weird signs on the wall – Albert Einstein needs to be put in a mental hospital and I’m staying away from him.

I know a few brilliant people who are different and at least one has been suspected of having Asperger’s. He doesn’t.

I’ll post this and post more, zeroing in specifically on what it takes to get an Autism Spectrum Disorder “label”. We’ll look at the actual symptoms a person must have before getting that label.

Just remember, because some people are different does not mean they are defective.


93 posted on 03/29/2014 10:14:38 AM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: agrarianlady

> One thing that intrigues me is gut bacteria.

If you browse around on Perlmutter’s site, you’ll see that it also intrigues him. He’s even starting a professional journal just for that topic. (The other thing you’ll see a lot is recommendations for Vitamin D supplementation, which I neglected to mention earlier.)

Gut biome is definitely on the radar in LCHF/paleo/primal circles. And a lot of what’s in standard diet is destructive to beneficial gut bacteria: high glycemic foods, gluten-bearing grains, antibiotics in meats, insecticide residues (and actual insecticide in Bt GMOs), glyphosate uptake in RR crops, etc. Some may not be a big deal, but all are worth avoiding. You can add them back later as a challenge.

The leading edge of gut biome research is FMT, which no one would consider except that it has striking results.

> Yes, possibly. I have an oldest daughter with Asperger’s and two children who do NOT have it, so this diet issue must affect one and not the others?

If it’s a gut biome issue, it could simply be the difference in the mother’s microbiota for each birth, because that’s where the kid gets their starter dose. I’ve also read that Cesarean Section leaves the kid quite deficient, which is not surprising.

It could also be infant antibiotics.

> I WISH I’d known then what I know now about probiotics.

Yep. I recently had a course of antibiotics, and chose to follow that up with a month of PBs, suspecting that the AB would trash my gut, and it appeared to, and it’s returning to normal.

> Psychologists are starting to treat anxiety, depression, and OCD with probiotics.

Anyone doing this on their own needs to know that most retail room-temp PBs are worthless (consumerlab.com tests PBs, if you have a subscription). If it doesn’t come out of the pharmacy fridge, don’t buy it (or just order VSL#3 online, which ships refrigerated).


94 posted on 03/29/2014 10:17:18 AM PDT by Boundless (Survive Obamacare by not needing it.)
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To: Alberta's Child

The statistical formulas can always be fudged for money. It starts with samples. Who is being tested, how, and who is going to do the assessment of the results. The one looking for something will see what might not be there. We all do it. just search for “flawed statistics.” Doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist, just that not as many people should be included.

A big problem is with initial research and the almighty grants. Just read that there are 20,000 tests created every year. BIG money for universities.

I was just thinking last night that basic statistical analysis (bell curve) may in itself be flawed. The originator was also the founder of eugenics. Worrisome to me.


95 posted on 03/29/2014 10:17:53 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: Kartographer; B4Ranch; JRandomFreeper; Old Sarge; greeneyes; sockmonkey; Dacula; All

I meant to ping you to my post 93.


96 posted on 03/29/2014 10:17:55 AM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: Marcella

Glad to get more of your writings ... :-) ...


97 posted on 03/29/2014 10:22:07 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Texas Fossil

This is what should be applied to those with PTS and also those with suicidal tendencies. Healing the brain, like physical therapy. Exciting stuff. Thanks for the post.


98 posted on 03/29/2014 10:22:21 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: huldah1776

> What about soy formula?

I’ve never looked into commercial bady formula products. I’d expect to be horrified by most them (high glycemic).

This might be worth a look:
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/soy-baby-formula

I personally don’t eat unfermented soy anymore, and very little of that.


99 posted on 03/29/2014 10:28:12 AM PDT by Boundless (Survive Obamacare by not needing it.)
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To: Star Traveler

My son was also fascinated with fans, a spinner, started talking late, and had problems communicating what he knew. He had senior level reading skills in 6th grade but couldn’t write a stitch. Other than being told he was borderline ADD, and being hated by his lesbian principal, no other major issues. He does hate math, too. He is very mechanically inclined (so am I) and does have problems with friends. He is now 22 and a Marine. A great rifleman and aRtistic (but doesn’t do it anymore-I kept all his work).


100 posted on 03/29/2014 10:39:56 AM PDT by huldah1776
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