Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Caribbean Payback: Europe's Former Colonies Battle For Slavery Reparations
Foreign Affairs ^ | April 2, 2014 | Jonathan Holloway

Posted on 04/03/2014 5:11:58 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet

In early March, Caribbean heads of state met to discuss a range of issues affecting the region, including economic development, climate change, and trade agreements. But at the very center of their agenda was a debate about history, race, and trauma -- specifically, the financial, psychological, and cultural traumas of the slave trade and the structural racism that continues to haunt the Caribbean present.

The pressure to hold such a debate has been steadily building since last July -- although from another perspective, it has been building for hundreds of years. Either way, Caribbean nations are now determined to seek reparations from western European governments for centuries of slave trading and brutalizing colonial rule. And they have made clear that they are in search of much more than dollars (although money is certainly part of the equation). They are calling for Europe and the Caribbean to collaborate in writing a new shared history of empire and colonialism -- a history that would enable the region’s population to productively reimagine its present and future politics.

The sudden energy around reparations is striking. Through the early 1970s, most Caribbean territories were still under European control. The Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) was established in 1973, growing slowly from four members to its current size of 15 members and associates (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turks and Caicos). But it was not until July 2013 that Caribbean heads of state called for a CARICOM Reparations Commission (CRC). Only a few months after its establishment, the CRC -- which is chaired by Hilary Beckles, pro vice chancellor at the University of the West Indies and the author of a leading text on reparations, Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide -- issued its first region-wide call for restitution.

After a two-day, closed-door meeting last month, representatives from CARICOM emerged with a unanimous agreement on a ten-point program for reparations for “native genocide and slavery.” If all goes according to plan, high-ranking representatives from the Caribbean nations and the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and France (and perhaps also Denmark, Norway, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden) will gather at a mid-year conference to discuss how to move forward with reparations. If the former colonial powers refuse that invitation, the Caribbean nations intend to pursue legal remedy under the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. CARICOM has already retained counsel in preparation for a negative response from Europe.

The CRC reparations program passed last month can be neatly divided into two types of repair -- literal and figurative. The literal repairs essentially involve the transfer of money. For example, the program calls for former colonial powers to provide resources to address public-health crises such as hypertension and Type 2 diabetes that the CRC claims are directly related to legacies of racial slavery and apartheid. (Africa-descended people in the Caribbean have the highest rates in the world of both diseases.) It also calls for debt cancellation and for financial resources to attack illiteracy, improve the acquisition of new technologies, and assist the descendants of slaves who wish to resettle in Africa (also known as repatriation).

But even if European governments came together and provided the money to address all of these repairs, their work would be far from over. The figurative repairs sought by the CRC are less expensive but far more complicated. They include a formal apology for the slave trade, as well as programs to ease the social alienation and support the psychological rehabilitation of the descendents of slaves. Crucially, the CRC would also like European countries to provide resources to build new cultural institutions, such as museums, in the Caribbean dedicated to telling a history that moves beyond the still-dominant narrative of a benevolent colonial past.

Of these repairs, the apology would seem the easiest. But even that would likely prove tricky for European governments. In 2007, the bicentennial of the abolition of the British slave trade, Tony Blair, then British prime minister, turned down a chance to deliver a formal apology, reportedly because it would appear to be a legal admission of guilt and thereby incentivize more aggressive calls for reparation. Rather than apologize, Blair expressed "deep sorrow and regret" for his country’s participation in the slave trade.

But such calculations of self-interest do not necessarily need to determine the European response. Eight years before Blair's hedge, the city council of Liverpool -- one of the world's most active ports in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and one of only three English cities sanctioned to participate in the trade -- formally apologized for its role and promised "to work with Black communities and others in Liverpool to tackle racial inequality."

Liverpool was also a model in creating the very kind of cultural institutions that the CRC is now demanding that European countries help build in the Caribbean. In the early 1990s, after lobbying by local activists (both black and white), the National Museums Liverpool (which administers the museums at the city's Albert Docks) set about designing an exhibit at the Maritime Museum cataloging the local history of the slave trade and the larger global slave economy. The exhibition, titled "Transatlantic Slavery: Against Human Dignity," opened in 1994; traffic to the museum doubled almost immediately. In 2007, the "Transatlantic Slavery" exhibit moved from the Maritime Museum’s basement to a new International Slavery Museum, housed on the third floor of the Maritime Museum, where it became part of an expanded collection examining historic and contemporary forced labor. At the gala dinner celebrating the museum’s opening, David Fleming, the director of National Museums Liverpool, made a powerful declaration about the need to remember the histories of racial slavery and its legacies in Liverpool and beyond:

Liverpool has set a high standard -- one that, in most cases, Caribbean cultural institutions have struggled to live up to. One might think that Barbados -- given its status as a founding member of CARICOM, the fact that its prime minister chairs CARICOM’s subcommittee on reparations, and that one of its leading scholars, Bickles, is managing the reparations project -- would be a model for these cultural issues for the rest of the region. But the reality is far more troubling.

Although Barbados’ parliament commissioned a reparations task force in November 2012 (thereby making Barbados one of the first Caribbean countries to establish a national commission on the topic), the country has not yet made good on its calls for a "Multi-Ethnic Research Centre, a National Museum of Slavery, and a Centre for Reparations Research." While the impressive Barbados Museum and Historical Society has dedicated one of its eight galleries to the study of Africa and its cultural connection to the Caribbean and started building a slave trade archive, the museum remains largely focused on British planter life, the colonial elite, and life among garrisoned British troops. Meanwhile, most other cultural sites in Barbados that explore the country's past are routinely marked by sins of omission. They seem determined to do anything but acknowledge the African slave trade and the daily punishments of slave life on the island's sugarcane plantations.

This reluctance is made plain at one of the island's principal heritage tourist attractions, Sunbury Plantation House. The Sunbury House was built in the mid-seventeenth century on land deeded to one of the first European settlers on the island. Although the sugarcane fields are still there, the house is now a separately owned property that is open for tours, regular lunchtime meals, biweekly private dinners, and weddings and receptions. The house showcases [BL1] exquisite period furniture, an impressive collection of hand-drawn art that features [BL2] African slaves in parade dress and costume, and a wide assortment of tools that were used in the house, the gardens, and the fields. Tour guides will tell the visitor everything there is to know about the many plantation owners and the house's decor. The guides, however, make no mention of the lithographs picturing slaves, nor do they address the fact that slaves used the tools that are on display. In fact, visitors to Sunbury House will not hear a word about slaves or slavery, only "workers." Considering the fact that there were more than 200 slaves working at Sunbury prior to the island's only slave rebellion in 1816, the word choice is striking. So is the description of the house on its Web site: “In the extensively landscaped grounds are more fine authentic examples of old carts and machinery used in the last century to cultivate the land. Sunbury Plantation House, located in the tranquil St. Philip countryside is a living monument to plantation life of bygone era, carefully restored and lovingly cherished by its owners for posterity, for the enjoyment of generations to come."

It is important to realize that these challenges are not unique to Barbados. Newly independent island nations throughout the Caribbean have long wrestled with the tensions between economic development, tourism, and cultural repair. More often than not, tourist dollars have won the day. Complex elements of Afro-Caribbean traditions such as masquerade and carnival became stripped of their anti-establishment politics and were mass-marketed by hotel managers to a visiting public as mere performances. In Curaçao, to cite but one example, "national unity" became the explicit guiding logic when it came to determining representations of cultural heritage. This meant that talking about the history of the island's slave economy (and its literal colonial beginnings as a slave market) was deemed too divisive. Afro-Curaçaoan heritage and any examination of the social history of slavery did not begin in earnest until 1998, when the Museum Kura Hulanda was founded and began to mount exhibitions directly related to the island's history with slavery.

When CARICOM demands cultural reparations, it will be seeking to fix the wayward cultural narratives on offer by such institutions as the Sunbury Plantation House. The CRC program emphasizes the importance of museums as a form of public education and a source of political narratives: "European nations have invested in the development of community institutions such as museums and research centers in order to prepare their citizens for an understanding of [crimes against humanity]." Further, these museums and research centers "serve to reinforce within the consciousness of their citizens an understanding of their role in history as rulers and change agents." CARICOM argues that the lack of similar institutions in the Caribbean has prevented educators and researchers from adequately addressing the traumas that still affect the descendants of the African slave trade.

With some curatorial effort, the Sunbury House could easily be turned into a place that reflects on the relationship of forced labor to the island's political economy and, in turn, to the economies of the Atlantic empire. Former colonial powers have an important role to play in helping such institutions make this shift. European countries have the relevant historical and administrative expertise to help them change their scripts and retrain their tour guides to be expansive in the ways they connect the past to the present.

But the collective silences at Sunbury are but one example of a larger failure by colonial powers and their former colonies to foster conversations about their bloody history with slavery. It has been easier for the former colonizers to focus on the former colonies’ political institutions rather than more stubborn social issues, just as it has been more comfortable for postcolonial governments in the Caribbean to lean on the tourist trade with former colonizing powers to feed the islands’ coffers. Ignoring the shared history of slavery has achieved a working peace, perhaps, but it has been at the expense of the social equalities in the Caribbean and the many descendants of slaves quietly forced to suffer second-class education, job opportunities, and health-care delivery systems. For the advocates of reparation, this refusal, or inability, to talk about the past has created a festering wound for Afro-Caribbeans. In the eyes of the CRC, the Caribbean has become a place where the majority of inhabitants do not know their own history or, if they are hungry for it, cannot find it anywhere. They are struggling to live in the middle of a fundamental erasure.

This is the crux of the most challenging aspect of reparations. Finding the funding to improve physical health and welfare is mostly a matter of freeing up money. But it will be much more uncomfortable for European governments and Caribbean elites to participate in a cultural reframing of identities. For CARICOM, getting these privileged parties to think carefully and honestly about the sources of their plenty will be a tall order, far taller than any sugarcane stalk might ever grow.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government
KEYWORDS: blacks; reparations

1 posted on 04/03/2014 5:11:58 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Europe gave them roads, railways, the model for a functioning civil service, the concept of property rights, and some of the most beautiful and bountiful places on the planet to call their own.

Ay “debt” that may have existed has been repaid a thousand times over.


2 posted on 04/03/2014 5:14:22 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Lurker

lets go back thousands of years. lets go after the muslims for invading and enslaving europeans, turkey, israel, lets go after the mongols, and the persians, and the babylonians and the syrians, anbd the egyptians....

man up, world.


3 posted on 04/03/2014 5:17:26 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

The slave trade was a horrible thing but it’s important to realize that at the heart of the slave trade were the Arabs, who had been slavers for a thousand years before the Europeans got into it.

Also worth mentioning is that the only holders of African slaves today are again... Arabs.


4 posted on 04/03/2014 5:21:30 PM PDT by samtheman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

How will the ‘anti-racist’ Europeans respond? Remember, in Europe, anything you say can and will be used against you in a hate crime court of law.


5 posted on 04/03/2014 5:21:53 PM PDT by Viennacon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Secret Agent Man

Don’t forget the Vikings. They took and sold slaves too.
I’m sure there is one or two wandering around somewhere we can squeeze for a few bucks. Maybe have them donate a Saab?


6 posted on 04/03/2014 5:22:37 PM PDT by drunknsage
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: drunknsage

yeah, good one. i wasn’t doing an all-inclusive, just examples from thousands of years ago.


7 posted on 04/03/2014 5:24:46 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

It’s the haves and the have nots.
Case studies are available courtesy of the lottery system. Having prosperity is dependent on more than just getting a few or a lot of dollars. Socialism won’t fix what centuries have failed to foster.


8 posted on 04/03/2014 5:28:54 PM PDT by Recompennation (Constitutional protection for all not ju st selectively for Democrats.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

It’s the haves and the have nots.
Case studies are available courtesy of the lottery system. Having prosperity is dependent on more than just getting a few or a lot of dollars. Socialism won’t fix what centuries have failed to foster.


9 posted on 04/03/2014 5:28:54 PM PDT by Recompennation (Constitutional protection for all not ju st selectively for Democrats.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
They are calling for Europe and the Caribbean to collaborate in writing a new shared history of empire and colonialism -- a history that would enable the region’s population to productively reimagine its present and future politics.

What is this even supposed to mean? Everyone can agree slavery was a horrible beginning, but be that as it may, what are any of these places worth outside of tourism?

10 posted on 04/03/2014 5:30:08 PM PDT by workerbee (The President of the United States is DOMESTIC ENEMY #1!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
The shake-down never ends.

How about they seek reparations from descendants of the African chieftains who sold them into slavery? That should hold them awhile; then we can get back to them.

11 posted on 04/03/2014 5:31:09 PM PDT by SharpRightTurn (White, black, and red all over--America's affirmative action, metrosexual president.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Rather than paying them they could bundle them up and give them a complimentary boat ride back to Africa .... seems fair ... I’m sure the Arab and African slave traders would gladly consider compensation upon their return.


12 posted on 04/03/2014 5:32:15 PM PDT by RetiredTexasVet (Waiting to shine the light on a honest, moral and ethical person in the Administration ...waiting, .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

So they’re gonna sue the Africans that sold their ancestors into slavery, right?


13 posted on 04/03/2014 5:36:38 PM PDT by Little Ray (How did I end up in this hand-basket, and why is it getting so hot?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

The colonial slave traders are all dead, Jim.


14 posted on 04/03/2014 5:37:17 PM PDT by windsorknot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Lots of touristas might not show up if this becomes a real nuisance movement.

You can’t eat non-existent reparations so the Black Extremists and Island Stupids need to be taught a lesson or two.


15 posted on 04/03/2014 5:39:26 PM PDT by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

I was in South Florida for several months before Obama was elected. Radio stations from the Caribbean were jubilant that finally they would see some reparations paid to them by Obama after he was elected.

These people are nuts. They’ll have to move to the US, go on welfare and Obamacare, a direct form of “reparations.”


16 posted on 04/03/2014 5:40:16 PM PDT by Veto!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: samtheman
The slave trade was a horrible thing but it’s important to realize that at the heart of the slave trade were the Arabs, who had been slavers for a thousand years before the Europeans got into it.
Also worth mentioning is that the only holders of African slaves today are again... Arabs.

The Arabs got their slaves from the African tribes that enslaved EACH other. The Arabs couldn't have just walked into Africa and take what they wanted. They bought and sold...but first the local Africans sold their own to those Arabs.

Also, my husband and I lived in the middle east for five years, Saudi Arabia, and there WAS slavery there but manumission occurred the 1970's. No slavery when we were there in the early-mid 1980's. The KSA is very different since the discovery and development of the petroleum/natural gas industry. They couldn't help but be massively changed with all the money, foreigners, trade and new industry pouring in all these decades. It would be impossible for them to remain unchanged.
The U.S. Air Force was in the KSA too, though they kept a VERY low profile and we traveled a lot and often to the other countries over there--Bahrain, the Emirates, Yemen...Egypt TWICE. That was our favorite place over there--twice cruising down the Nile.

Every culture in those days had slavery: China, Indochina, India, the middle/near east, Europe and the New World. There aren't many older countries and cultures that DIDN'T have it.
Slavery is an old business not endemic to any culture or country.

17 posted on 04/03/2014 5:40:38 PM PDT by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Repatriate them to their homelands of Africa, then see which conditions they prefer! Let them see first hand what Africans can do.... send them to Sierra Leone, or Mali.... better yet! The Sudan!

Fools never know when they have it good!


18 posted on 04/03/2014 5:42:12 PM PDT by himno hero (hadnuff)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Secret Agent Man

…let’s go after the cavemen from the tribe on the other side of the river.


19 posted on 04/03/2014 5:42:36 PM PDT by Veto!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: drunknsage
Don’t forget the Vikings. They took and sold slaves too.
I’m sure there is one or two wandering around somewhere we can squeeze for a few bucks. Maybe have them donate a Saab

We have friends in Sweden. The Scandinavians pronounce "VIKINGS" as "veee-kings." Boy, does THAT ever sound wimpy. VAI-kings sounds much, much bolder.

20 posted on 04/03/2014 5:43:13 PM PDT by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Veto!
I was in South Florida for several months before Obama was elected. Radio stations from the Caribbean were jubilant that finally they would see some reparations paid to them by Obama after he was elected.
These people are nuts. They’ll have to move to the US, go on welfare and Obamacare, a direct form of “reparations.”

They ARE nuts.
Reparations? You gotta be kidding.
When I've visited the Caribbean I've always thought that it was a MESS.

21 posted on 04/03/2014 5:46:07 PM PDT by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: cloudmountain

I visited Puerto Rico, which was actually very nice in the ‘80s. Even back then, the rest of the Carib was too sad, depressing, dangerous to visit. And ‘way back in the 40s my parents took a Carib cruise. Amazing photo of my young mother walking down the street in Port Au Prince with a look of disbelief/compassion/fear on her face.


22 posted on 04/03/2014 5:57:30 PM PDT by Veto!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
Their basic problem is the evil doers all died from diseases and the former slaves survived populating the whole area with themselves. They basically own it all, so are they going to sue themselves?
23 posted on 04/03/2014 5:57:59 PM PDT by A CA Guy ( God Bless America, God Bless and keep safe our fighting men and women.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: workerbee
What is this even supposed to mean?

They are attempting to "change the narrative." IOW, rewriting the story to skew it any way that suits them. Truth is of no concern.

24 posted on 04/03/2014 6:00:01 PM PDT by Veto!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Give them all directions and tell them to swim back to Africa!


25 posted on 04/03/2014 6:01:48 PM PDT by dalereed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

The Jews were slaves of the Egyptians for hundreds of years. I wonder how it would go over if they demanded reparations??


26 posted on 04/03/2014 6:11:48 PM PDT by elpadre (AfganistaMr Obama said the goal was to "disrupt, dismantle and defeat al-hereQaeda" and its allies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: samtheman

Also worth mentioning is that the only holders of African slaves today are again... Arabs.
And let us not forget the American modern day black plantation owners, the black congressional congress and the NAACP


27 posted on 04/03/2014 6:12:07 PM PDT by ronnie raygun (Im missing a jumbo jet with 235 passengers has anyone seen it?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

“This is not the first time economic justice has been demanded of the former colonial powers. In 1999, the African World Reparation and Repatriation Truth Commission unsuccessfully challenged many western nations for a total of over

$770 trillion.

Inspired by this, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda all tried independently to sue their respective colonial oppressors, but lacked the strength and unification that Caricom now provides.”


28 posted on 04/03/2014 6:13:46 PM PDT by griswold3 ("Pray for Obama. Psalm 109:8".)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dalereed

Shouldn’t worry. It’s just like here The Politicians are corrupt. A small minority of people work fairly hard, the women are mostly Christian Church goers and encourage good behavior. Like here , the men are either engaged in Commerce or their bro’s are complete welfare sucking dirtbags…40/60


29 posted on 04/03/2014 6:15:02 PM PDT by acapesket
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Veto!

Puerto Rico is a Commonwealth and the US pays and has paid large sums to keep them afloat. They might consider those payments reparations - a matter of changing a word.


30 posted on 04/03/2014 6:15:39 PM PDT by elpadre (AfganistaMr Obama said the goal was to "disrupt, dismantle and defeat al-hereQaeda" and its allies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: SharpRightTurn

when early explorers sailed to these islands they found scant populations of warring peoples, who practiced enslavement. American indians owned caribbean slaves before the colonists landed. Are they going to sue the AIs for reparations, too, or just the white folks?


31 posted on 04/03/2014 6:17:10 PM PDT by blueplum
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet
God, how degrading. Uh, guys? You want museums? Build your own damn museums. You want an alternate historical narrative? Write it yourselves. You want money? Earn it yourselves. And be grateful you're living in the Caribbean and not some West African hellhole.

The way I figure it, these grifters owe their ancestors' slavers reparations and a vote of thanks.

32 posted on 04/03/2014 6:22:53 PM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Wouldn’t surprise me a bit if postmodern Europe doesn’t have the wherewithal to muster an argument against this silliness and winds up paying reparations. They may even thank their former colonies for the opportunity to atone for their sins and ease their guilt ridden conscience.


33 posted on 04/03/2014 6:25:01 PM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Just repatriate them.


34 posted on 04/03/2014 6:42:03 PM PDT by Iron Munro (The future ain't what it use to be -- Yogi Berra)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Iron Munro

The Lincoln solution. Why he was assassinated, in my opinion.


35 posted on 04/03/2014 6:44:21 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (I will raise $2M for Cruz and/or Palin's next run, what will you do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Veto!

yes, exactly.

reminds me of mel brooks and our cave’s anthem: everyone else can go to hell, except cave 76....


36 posted on 04/03/2014 6:51:48 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Secret Agent Man

LOL I’d forgotten that.


37 posted on 04/03/2014 6:59:14 PM PDT by Veto!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Haiti is the best example of wwhat blacks and/or New World slaves can do when allowed to run a government.

They mismanaged sooo badly that they degraded Haiti from a lushly productive island to a near Martian landscape where even the top soil is gone - yup, the Haitians are down to subsoil and trying for more degradation of all sorts as I type.

Reparations? We brought them out of Stone Age ‘cultures”.

You can take a man out of the Stone Age, but you can’t take the Stone Age out of the Man.


38 posted on 04/03/2014 7:14:45 PM PDT by GladesGuru (Islam Delenda Est - because of what Islam is and because of what Muslims do.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

I will gladly compel any living person who owned slaves to pay reparations to any living former slave or even any child of his who was alive while he was a slave.


39 posted on 04/03/2014 7:16:50 PM PDT by dsrtsage (One half of all people have below average IQ. In the US the number is 54%)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: blueplum

“when early explorers sailed to these islands they found scant populations of warring peoples, who practiced enslavement.”

Cannibalism - don’t forget the Cannibalism Columbus described on those islands.


40 posted on 04/03/2014 7:27:43 PM PDT by GladesGuru (Islam Delenda Est - because of what Islam is and because of what Muslims do.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Veto!

.......”This makes the Virgin Islands’ homicide rate about 10 times higher than the U.S. average of 4.7 homicides per 100,000 people in 2011, the most recent year of data published by the FBI”.

**********************************************************

I just lived in the USVI and St. Maarten for approximately 18 months. There were many reasons for NOT buying a condo there, or staying any longer there, but the quote above was at the top of the list. To say nothing of your life, condos don’t go up in value in this environment. And, for sure, going to bed on those islands at night was an exercise in fear and made you appreciate the 2nd Ammendment and Texas.

Now, in fairness, the murder rate has gone down from the quote above but it is still way high and all the underlying problems are still there. A month before I left, my next door neighbor had an AK 47 stuck in her face and was robbed at a restaurant. Then a huge gunfight erupted out in the parking lot with police. My friend in St. Maarten where I also lived had his ten year old son robbed at knife point of his cell phone. An American couple living 2,500 feet (in St. Maarten) from me was hacked to death by their own security guards.

So, to say it (the Caribbean) is a dangerous place is an understatement and it is aided and abetted by newspapers which either back page the stories or run them one day and then you don’t ever hear anything again.


41 posted on 04/03/2014 7:37:39 PM PDT by Cen-Tejas (it's the debt bomb stupid!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Veto!

The Caribbean disappointed me too. I will never go back there again. All drugs and disappointment.


42 posted on 04/03/2014 9:28:43 PM PDT by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Unfortunately, the self-loathing white elites of Europe will gladly rob their taxpayers to enrich further the corrupt elites of the Caribbean.


43 posted on 04/03/2014 9:34:29 PM PDT by Dagnabitt (Amnesty is Treason. Its agents are Traitors.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: workerbee
They are calling for Europe and the Caribbean to collaborate in writing a new shared history of empire and colonialism -- a history that would enable the region’s population to productively reimagine its present and future politics.

-------

What is this even supposed to mean? Everyone can agree slavery was a horrible beginning, but be that as it may, what are any of these places worth outside of tourism?

Annual reparation payments. That's exactly what it means.
44 posted on 04/03/2014 10:34:44 PM PDT by 98ZJ USMC
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Lurker

“Europe gave them roads, railways, the model for a functioning civil service, the concept of property rights, and some of the most beautiful and bountiful places on the planet to call their own. Any “debt” that may have existed has been repaid a thousand times over.”

No matter; whether in the highest levels of government in the Caribbean or in Penn Station in Newark, we are expected to simply pay when a darker person with palm outstretched asks for money. We can put them up there with death and taxes...


45 posted on 04/04/2014 3:04:22 AM PDT by kearnyirish2 (Affirmative action is economic warfare against white males (and therefore white families).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Cen-Tejas

I didn’t realize it was that bad, Cen-Tejas. And what a pity, all that lovely climate and scenery. Glad you got out without hatchet marks.

Perhaps if more people knew the dangers there, they wouldn’t buy homes or go on vacation there. Perhaps the local “officials” would do something about crime then.

My ancestors came from Wales to Nevis, but that was in 1650. For the first time, after reading your post, I’m glad they left that gorgeous island.


46 posted on 04/04/2014 10:02:14 AM PDT by Veto!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

In otherwords their economies are in the toilet.


47 posted on 04/04/2014 12:15:58 PM PDT by Organic Panic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Lurker
Any “debt” that may have existed has been repaid a thousand times over.

If anyone ever calculates the life expectancy of these Caribbean nations today, vs the African sources of slaves, they may find that the net "reparations" is negative!

Then what will they do?

48 posted on 04/04/2014 10:18:45 PM PDT by publius911 ( At least Nixon had the good g race to resign!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson