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Moving in with parents becomes more common for the middle-aged
Los Angeles Times ^ | April 20, 2014 | Walter Hamilton

Posted on 04/21/2014 2:30:54 PM PDT by thackney

The number of Californians 50 to 64 who live in their parents' homes has surged in recent years, reflecting the grim economic aftermath of the Great Recession.

Debbie Rohr lives with her husband and twin teenage sons in a well-tended three-bedroom home in Salinas. The ranch-style house has a spacious kitchen that looks out on a yard filled with rosebushes. It's a modest but comfortable house, the type that Rohr, 52, pictured for herself at this stage of life. She just never imagined that it would be her childhood home, a return to a bedroom where she once hung posters of Olivia Newton-John and curled up with her beloved Mrs. Beasley doll. Driven by economic necessity — Rohr has been chronically unemployed and her husband lost his job last year — she moved her family back home with her 77-year-old mother. At a time when the still sluggish economy has sent a flood of jobless young adults back home, older people are quietly moving in with their parents at twice the rate of their younger counterparts. For seven years through 2012, the number of Californians aged 50 to 64 who live in their parents' homes swelled 67.6% to about 194,000, according to the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the Insight Center for Community Economic Development. The jump is almost exclusively the result of financial hardship caused by the recession rather than for other reasons, such as the need to care for aging parents, said Steven P. Wallace, a UCLA professor of public health who crunched the data. "The numbers are pretty amazing," Wallace said. "It's an age group that you normally think of as pretty financially stable. They're mid-career. They may be thinking ahead toward retirement. They've got a nest egg going. And then all of a sudden...

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: California
KEYWORDS: americaindecline; americandream; housingbubble; inflatedvalues; obamaeconomy; obamanomics; ownyourownhome; realestateflipping; unemployment
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1 posted on 04/21/2014 2:30:54 PM PDT by thackney
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Debbie Rohr lives with her husband and twin teenage sons in a well-tended three-bedroom home in Salinas.

The ranch-style house has a spacious kitchen that looks out on a yard filled with rosebushes. It’s a modest but comfortable house, the type that Rohr, 52, pictured for herself at this stage of life.

She just never imagined that it would be her childhood home, a return to a bedroom where she once hung posters of Olivia Newton-John and curled up with her beloved Mrs. Beasley doll.

Driven by economic necessity — Rohr has been chronically unemployed and her husband lost his job last year — she moved her family back home with her 77-year-old mother.

At a time when the still sluggish economy has sent a flood of jobless young adults back home, older people are quietly moving in with their parents at twice the rate of their younger counterparts.

For seven years through 2012, the number of Californians aged 50 to 64 who live in their parents’ homes swelled 67.6% to about 194,000, according to the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the Insight Center for Community Economic Development.

The jump is almost exclusively the result of financial hardship caused by the recession rather than for other reasons, such as the need to care for aging parents, said Steven P. Wallace, a UCLA professor of public health who crunched the data.

“The numbers are pretty amazing,” Wallace said. “It’s an age group that you normally think of as pretty financially stable. They’re mid-career. They may be thinking ahead toward retirement. They’ve got a nest egg going. And then all of a sudden...


2 posted on 04/21/2014 2:32:04 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

And the over 80 are moving in with their children!!! House is getting full!!


3 posted on 04/21/2014 2:32:56 PM PDT by tired&retired
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To: thackney

Hopeychangey!


4 posted on 04/21/2014 2:33:57 PM PDT by max americana (fired liberals in our company last election, and I laughed while they cried (true story))
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To: thackney

Salinas is a Mexican thug show.

Every weekend is punctuated by knifings, shootings, fights, etc.

Blue collar jobs are dominated by illegals and “Mexican-Americans” who make sure no palefaces either get hired or work on a crew for very long.

And people like Ms. Rohr are the ones who voted for the politicians that did this to them and continue to do it to them. Like lemmings the blithering idiot bliss ninnies of California still vote for screaming Leftist rats.

No sympathy.


5 posted on 04/21/2014 2:36:16 PM PDT by Regulator
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To: thackney
reflecting the grim economic aftermath of the Great Recession caused by the $4 trillion government.

The Right needs to connect the dots and make it plain.

6 posted on 04/21/2014 2:36:17 PM PDT by PapaNew
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To: thackney

Obama’s brave new world.


7 posted on 04/21/2014 2:39:14 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Haven't you lost enough freedoms? Support an end to the WOD now.)
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To: max americana

But of course, the article does not discuss how the economic policies of this administration have contributed to difficulty in finding work.

If W were still president, we would have seen some potshots at W and his policies.


8 posted on 04/21/2014 2:40:53 PM PDT by Dilbert San Diego (Im)
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To: thackney

So ‘Debbie’ decided she’s had enough and moved in to her inheritance a few years early. Plus, it’s a lot easier to deep freeze the bodies for a few years and keep collecting them SS checks, etc. until it gets near time you get found out. Then you can thaw them out real good and then call the amberlamps like they keeled over just now.


9 posted on 04/21/2014 2:40:59 PM PDT by Gaffer (Comprehensive Immigration Reform is just another name for Comprehensive Capitulation)
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To: thackney

And this is a bad thing how? Fifty percent of people 85 and older have Alzheimer’s. Lots of people can’t afford a full time caregiver like my parents have, both under 85 and both with Alzheimer’s. Thank Gd these older children love them enough to move back in with them and return the love they were given.

Many elderly do have money or a solid house. Family should share their resources. And their loving care. I heard that one of my neighbors has 4 generations in their home. Gd bless them.


10 posted on 04/21/2014 2:41:50 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: Regulator
... blithering idiot bliss ninnies of California ...

LOL, awesome!

11 posted on 04/21/2014 2:43:25 PM PDT by Spirochete (Does the FedGov have the attributes of a legitimate government?)
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To: thackney

I don’t see a problems with this. It can be family taking care of family. Mom needs help and so do the kids and grand kids. I would rather see family helping than my tax dollar.

I know plenty of people who stick their parents and aunts in subsidized housing while they own three and four bedroom homes. I am tired of subsidizing the middle class lazies too.


12 posted on 04/21/2014 2:43:54 PM PDT by Chickensoup (Leftist totalitarian fascism is on the move.)
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To: thackney

Employers have been relentless in laying off older employees to reduce average salary levels and contain healthcare costs. And the odds are not with a 50-someting or older professional trying to find another salaryman job before they age out of the market.


13 posted on 04/21/2014 2:44:37 PM PDT by Menehune56 ("Let them hate so long as they fear" (Oderint Dum Metuant), Lucius Accius (170 BC - 86 BC))
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To: tired&retired
And the over 80 are moving in with their children!!! House is getting full!!

My Dad,who was widowed when I was young,lived in my house for the last 9 years of his life.He had a neurological disorder similar to,but not quite as serious as,Altzheimer's.He was good to me in my (many) hours of need so I tried to do the same.I suspect that many cases where the parents move in with the kids are at least somewhat similar to my situation.

14 posted on 04/21/2014 2:47:52 PM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Stalin Blamed The Kulaks,Obama Blames The Tea Party)
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To: tired&retired

Goodnight, Jimbob.
Goodnight, Sue Ellen.
Goodnight, Grampa.
Goodnight, John Boy.
Goodnight, Daddy.......

15 posted on 04/21/2014 2:47:58 PM PDT by seowulf (Cogito cogito, ergo cogito sum. Cogito.---Ambrose Bierce)
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To: Yaelle

This is actually how most American families lived until about 1950.


16 posted on 04/21/2014 2:52:06 PM PDT by Catmom (We're all gonna get the punishment only some of us deserve.)
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To: Gaffer

So ‘Debbie’ decided she’s had enough and moved in to her inheritance a few years early. Plus, it’s a lot easier to deep freeze the bodies for a few years and keep collecting them SS checks, etc. until it gets near time you get found out. Then you can thaw them out real good and then call the amberlamps like they keeled over just now.

<><><

Wow. sounds like you have a plan.


17 posted on 04/21/2014 2:59:04 PM PDT by dmz
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To: Chickensoup
I don’t see a problems with this.

Yeah, if people choose to do it. But they're being forced to do it. What happened to the American Dream? Now we're all going live like the Waltons, three or more generations in one house, everybody doubling up on bedrooms.

I know the woman in the story won't get any sympathy because she's in California, and it will be assumed that she voted Dem, though not all of us in California vote Dem. But it's happening all over, not just in California, and I for one think it's tragic.

18 posted on 04/21/2014 2:59:31 PM PDT by Nea Wood (When people get used to preferential treatment, equal treatment seems like discrimination.-Sowell)
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To: thackney

Where’s the pic of that little fancy-boy in his PJs with his cocoa?!?!


19 posted on 04/21/2014 3:01:30 PM PDT by thefactor (yes, as a matter of fact, i DID only read the excerpt)
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To: thackney

all part of getting people to live with less

the commie way


20 posted on 04/21/2014 3:02:46 PM PDT by sten (fighting tyranny never goes out of style)
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To: tired&retired

This is one 81 year old who would never live with her kids and I sold my big house and bought a condo so they couldn’t live with me.

Call me selfish and cruel, I don’t care.

I enjoy my life.

.


21 posted on 04/21/2014 3:03:26 PM PDT by Mears
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To: Gaffer

I have a friend of a similar demographic, though he’s single, who moved back home—and actually confided that he’d be in trouble now without his father’s social security income. Yikes!


22 posted on 04/21/2014 3:03:49 PM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Yaelle

Or, you could be like my husband and I. My mom lives in a little house right here on our property that we built for her. We pay her electricity and water bills. She pays no rent. I take her to her doctor appointments, shopping, etc. She’ll be 80 this year and I’m glad we can do it. AND, we do this all on my hubbys income. I stay home, take care of her, and make sure my 16 year old son is on top of his on-line schooling everyday. Luckily, no Alzheimers. She has a number of malady’s, but still takes care of herself mostly. Does her own cooking, laundry, cleaning, etc. I couldn’t imagine putting her in a home.


23 posted on 04/21/2014 3:04:01 PM PDT by Mama Shawna
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To: Yaelle

A good study of world culture would be who is honoring their parents and taking care of them. I could probably do it online.


24 posted on 04/21/2014 3:11:53 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: dmz

You know? I’m kinda Jonesing on that house my daughter and her husband have. NICE! With a pool I loaned them the bucks for......I’d be in heaven if they let me move in. I’d be more than willing to help out with my SS - the LONGER the better.

I think they’ll let me do it, but it’s iffy for the wife, so that’s a little touchy right now. If it ever happens, I’ll probably have to buy the deep freezer! :o)


25 posted on 04/21/2014 3:12:33 PM PDT by Gaffer (Comprehensive Immigration Reform is just another name for Comprehensive Capitulation)
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To: Nea Wood
Yeah, if people choose to do it

I wish there were rules to protect the neighbors. I live in a nice older neighborhood. These houses don't have the electircal systems to accomomdate two or three generations and the greater amount of electricity everyone uses today. There are driveways and garages, but in more cases not to accomodate more than three cars without being really ugly. It seems there should be some limits to how many people can live in one house. It's a health and safety issue.

26 posted on 04/21/2014 3:14:39 PM PDT by grania
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To: Regulator; thackney

Ya think families moving in together are somehow isolated to Salinas or CA?

Do a search...This trend is rapidly increasing all over the country and has been for over a decade now.

In fact, so much so, builders are now designing multinational homes.


27 posted on 04/21/2014 3:14:43 PM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: tired&retired

And Pajama Boy is living in the basement.


28 posted on 04/21/2014 3:16:05 PM PDT by ilovesarah2012
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To: Regulator

Er multi-generational homes...


29 posted on 04/21/2014 3:16:51 PM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: Yaelle

Nice to see that someone agrees with me-I’d give anything to have my mom alive and right here with me-most of my family lives in multigenerational homes, especially the ranchers. If it all goes to hell, my bro and his family are welcome with me, too-and I don’t think it is an ethnic thing with us-families living on one property or in one house was common until the early 20th century. I think it is the best way to BE a family...


30 posted on 04/21/2014 3:17:36 PM PDT by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line"...)
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To: max americana
Exactly. They think it's bad now, we got around 33 more months of the Kenyan nightmare. Just think how long a month is...We got 33 more of those to go through...and if that ain't bad enough - the way the GOP is totally RINO nowadays, Hitlery might very well end up being next POTUS.


31 posted on 04/21/2014 3:19:53 PM PDT by GrandJediMasterYoda (Hitlery: Incarnation of evil.)
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To: Mears

Most people will not be able to afford to do that-assuming they want to-the way things are going.


32 posted on 04/21/2014 3:20:10 PM PDT by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line"...)
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To: huldah1776

no healhcare no nursing homes. interesting study here:
http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Paper/12398133.aspx

“Facing a rapid ageing of their population, many countries are in the process of health and social care reforms.” = death panels?


33 posted on 04/21/2014 3:22:52 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: PapaNew
The Right needs to connect the dots and make it plain.

All hope is lost. Everyone already knows about the dots.
Bottom line, the takers outnumber the makers.

34 posted on 04/21/2014 3:25:19 PM PDT by oldbrowser (Does the federal government qualify as a terrorist organization?)
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To: grania

I live in the country with the others like me, so no one’s cars and driveways are anyone else’s business, so I can’t relate to that-but I can speak to the electricity issue-as for the electrical systems-what is the deal-is the added use causing fires or outages? A competent electrician can always install more outlets and breakers in a home, if needed-he just needs to bring more power from the pole. It isn’t like there is only a finite amount available...


35 posted on 04/21/2014 3:28:39 PM PDT by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line"...)
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To: Regulator

“No sympathy.”

Agreed

I will not buy products from stores or companies based in California.

I will not transit through airports in California.

I will not help them in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack.


36 posted on 04/21/2014 3:29:02 PM PDT by Fai Mao (Genius at Large)
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To: Texan5

Yeah a neighbor with three generations living there burned down their house except for the brick walls. It does affect me....everyone’s homeowner’s insurance went up.


37 posted on 04/21/2014 3:31:04 PM PDT by grania
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To: grania

If they “burned down their house” was it on purpose? If it was just an electrical fire, that crap happens everywhere, and for all sorts of reasons-I got struck by lightening that came through the stereo in my house years ago, but no fire...

If you’re concerned, you should call a licensed electrician and have the power from the pole to your home checked, and it isn’t costly. You can’t dictate how much power your neighbors have/use-thank God-but you can be safe rather than have an accident happen. There should be enough power from that pole to run a B&B with the right number of breakers and outlets in your home.

I can’t imagine insurance going up over a neighbor’s fire-that sounds like REAL discrimination, rather than the fake kind we always hear about...


38 posted on 04/21/2014 3:51:23 PM PDT by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line"...)
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To: grania

Oops-I just saw that you’re from Massachusetts-I know the insurance is radically different from here-the rating of neighborhoods homeowner insurance is based on property crimes-theft, vandalism, arson-accidents don’t count, except to the individual homeowner they happen to...


39 posted on 04/21/2014 4:00:28 PM PDT by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line"...)
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To: thackney

If they Voted for Obama or any Democrat for that matter, they will not even get a “smidgen” of sympathy from me.

If they didn’t, welcome to the club Comrades.


40 posted on 04/21/2014 4:13:51 PM PDT by Kickass Conservative (Nobody owes you a living, so shut up and get back to work...)
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To: seowulf

Exactly. 3 generations isn’t a bad thing. Raising the kids and taking care of the old folks. In fact it was the model not so long ago.


41 posted on 04/21/2014 4:16:05 PM PDT by wonkowasright (Wonko from outside the asylum)
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To: Catmom

True my Great Uncle lived with my Great Grandparents he was a bachelor. I love looking at the pics I Have of them all together in a flat on the lower east side of Manhattan.


42 posted on 04/21/2014 4:22:21 PM PDT by angcat
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To: Dilbert San Diego

“we would have seen some potshots at W and his policies.”

Some?? EVERYDAY these MSM f*cks were hurling grenades at him 24/7 for 8 years.


43 posted on 04/21/2014 5:13:01 PM PDT by max americana (fired liberals in our company last election, and I laughed while they cried (true story))
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To: Fai Mao; Regulator
I will not buy products from stores or companies based in California. I will not transit through airports in California.

I will not help them in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack.

But you have no problem spending lots of time on a CA based website...

BTW, since you declined to post wher it is you live, then asked anyone looking to guess, I'd guess New Jersey. Maybe Guam.

BTW, CA has probably sent more aid/equipment to other states in times of disasters, than any other.

44 posted on 04/21/2014 5:43:10 PM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: Gay State Conservative

The economies of shared living. Often these things can make sense.


45 posted on 04/21/2014 7:14:34 PM PDT by MSF BU (n)
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To: MSF BU
The economies of shared living. Often these things can make sense.

Yes,that's often true.It's easy to imagine it being the reason why some parents move in with their kids as they get up in years.It wasn't the case with my Dad,though.He was financially comfortable...he was failing medically and needed "assisted" living.

46 posted on 04/21/2014 7:24:51 PM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Stalin Blamed The Kulaks,Obama Blames The Tea Party)
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To: wonkowasright
3 generations isn’t a bad thing.

Absolutely. I lived it myself.

When I was 15 my grandma came to live with my family and we did so until I graduated from college and moved away.

It wasn't always easy but it was well worth it.

47 posted on 04/21/2014 7:30:53 PM PDT by seowulf (Cogito cogito, ergo cogito sum. Cogito.---Ambrose Bierce)
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To: Mama Shawna

I think it’s great how you live, giving mom a bit of independence while seeing to her needs. Love it.

One point I really need to make on something you said. Please don’t EVER say to ANYONE “I’d never put my parent into a home.” Even if it is true. The reason I say that is because alzheimers takes away a person’s personality or self control or many other functioning ways. I’m on an alzheimers caregiver list, and because of that line, that every loving child thinks about his own parents, good people are being beaten down literally and figuratively, keeping their spouses or parents home at all costs.

There comes a time when they just can’t do the heavy work any more. I won’t go into all the terrible experiences, that can go on 24/7, that a caregiver can suffer when their loved one is deep down the alzheimers path. You can imagine, and some of the experiences are far worse than you can imagine. But it’s time we ALL started caring for the caregivers in our neighborhoods. Trust me, they are struggling. Some actually die before their affected partners because it’s too much for them.

Luckily my parents could afford full time at home round the clock care. Not everyone can. Sometimes people physically simply can’t do it any more. I’m just saying, because I’m getting to know that world. Sometimes there is no other way than a home for the memory impaired. It helps to have neutral people help.


48 posted on 04/21/2014 11:06:53 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: thackney

It happened a lot during the Great Depression when many in the urban areas lost it all - savings, homes, cars, jobs, etc. and were put out on the street. Many returned to the family farms of their parents or moved in with siblings until they could start over. People with strong families ties survived.

Having talked with survivors of that era, it was a terrible time. People lived “without” and “made do” with the most basic necessities of life until after the end of WWII.

There was no welfare safety net like we have today to fall back on. They learned to struggle with no job, no money, no food, no clothing, no shelter, or shortages of whatever until times got better. This period resulted in a lot of the government welfare programs we see today.

This is what is scary about today’s government welfare safety net. People expect it to always be there and sufficient to meet their survival needs. They are being lulled into a false sense of security. Each day more and more people are being added to the welfare rolls.

Our government should be encouraging people to get off the welfare rolls through tax breaks and other incentives. Instead, they are going in the other direction.

Potentially these programs could be overwhelmed in another economic crisis or nationwide disaster and might fail completely. And where would these people go and what would they do if they had to survive another Great Depression?

Do they have strong family ties or other ways to survive? I doubt if family ties would be of much use since entire generations of families are now dependent on government welfare. Depending on the government could be fatal.

Older children moving back into their elderly parents home is definitely a sign the economy is failing. But is it an early warning that government welfare programs are not achieving their intended purpose and are starting to fail?


49 posted on 04/22/2014 12:13:32 AM PDT by Texicanus (Texas, it's a whole 'nother country.)
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To: Yaelle

I totally understand. We DO have Alzheimer’s in our family. My aunt on my Dad’s side. My step mom also went through it with her mother, and it’s NOT pretty. My Mom’s hairdresser also has a client, whom we met last time we were there, that is in her late eighties and has declined significantly over the last few years. You could see the strain on her husbands face. Said she had been a devout Catholic all her life, and you would never hear a swear word cross her lips, but lately she’d let out with a string of cuss words aimed at her husband, vicious, mean things that would normally never occur. My step mom said her mother got the same way, and in her more lucid moments would apologize. It’s something that cant be controlled. If it ever comes to that, I will look for help. I have 4 older brothers that will need to kick in for that cost if it happens. So far it has not, and Mom’s doctor told us a couple months ago she has no signs of it. Still sharp as a tack (you should see her answer the questions on Jeapordy!). I’m glad that so far she’s independent, and I’ll do what I can to keep her out of a home, and in the little home she loves so much. But, you are right, sometimes life happens, and you CANT do it all. God Bless You and the work you do. I’m sure it can’t be easy.


50 posted on 04/22/2014 6:05:46 AM PDT by Mama Shawna
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