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So long, net neutrality? FCC to propose new pay-for-preferential treatment rules
PC World ^ | 4/25/14 | Grant Gross

Posted on 04/25/2014 4:35:08 AM PDT by SoFloFreeper

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission will take public comments before moving forward with a new set of net neutrality rules that sparked controversy when they were leaked in a news report earlier Wednesday.

The FCC will release a proposal soon to reinstate net neutrality rules that would allow broadband providers to negotiate with content providers for preferential treatment, an agency official confirmed Wednesday.

(Excerpt) Read more at pcworld.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: cronyism; technology
Cronyism....now the FCC will be able to control what "news" you get on the 'net.....
1 posted on 04/25/2014 4:35:08 AM PDT by SoFloFreeper
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; Still Thinking; ...

2 posted on 04/25/2014 4:37:35 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: SoFloFreeper

All freedoms are going down in the USA thanks to the
EXEMPT Congress “busy” abdicating from their brothels
and banks.


3 posted on 04/25/2014 4:40:20 AM PDT by Diogenesis
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To: SoFloFreeper

Another boon to mankind being destroyed by government.


4 posted on 04/25/2014 4:50:38 AM PDT by DakotaGator (Weep for the lost Republic! And keep your powder dry!!)
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To: SoFloFreeper
Alas, the FCC is finding out a LOT of people out there hate the idea. It may not even pass FCC's own internal vote.
5 posted on 04/25/2014 5:06:00 AM PDT by RayChuang88 (FairTax: America's economic cure)
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To: SoFloFreeper

Strangely enough, most Freepers are ardently opposed to Net Neutrality, too. No idea why.


6 posted on 04/25/2014 5:09:28 AM PDT by babble-on
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To: babble-on

I think what most FReepers are opposed to is greater FCC regulation of the Internet.


7 posted on 04/25/2014 5:14:05 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: DakotaGator

Hold on, not just yet. They have to public comment. Perhaps there will be sufficient participation as to hopefully continue with an open internet for a bit longer.


8 posted on 04/25/2014 5:27:44 AM PDT by wita
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To: wita; DakotaGator

huh? that might be they require public comment.


9 posted on 04/25/2014 5:30:14 AM PDT by wita
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To: SoFloFreeper

Maybe someone who really understands this issue can explain how a pure Net Neutrality system would handle a Netflix decision to convert all their movies to 4K putting huge pressure on the ISPs to handle the increased bandwidth requirements for a single content provider.

Who pays for the system upgrade caused by the Netflix decision? What is the Free Market solution that preserves Net Neutrality?


10 posted on 04/25/2014 5:48:39 AM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: RayChuang88
Alas, the FCC is finding out a LOT of people out there hate the idea.

Particularly Millenials. Passing this will virtually assure that scads of LIV's sit home this November.


11 posted on 04/25/2014 6:18:18 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: babble-on
Strangely enough, most Freepers are ardently opposed to Net Neutrality, too. No idea why.

In general we disdain government regulation. But this is one area in which it is frankly warranted.


12 posted on 04/25/2014 6:19:24 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: InterceptPoint

Free markets are simple and the “they” are two parties the buyer and the seller. Much of the problems we see with lousy service and high prices is due to monopoly agreements between local governments and last mile providers. Your local internet provider faces no competition.


13 posted on 04/25/2014 6:20:25 AM PDT by FreedomNotSafety
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To: SoFloFreeper

Met a young Marxist 8 years ago - and his two issues were “rare earth elements” and “net neutrality”.... Seems he was aligned with Chinese Communist...


14 posted on 04/25/2014 6:27:36 AM PDT by GOPJ (Democrats are waging war on white middle class men...)
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To: FreedomNotSafety
Your local internet provider faces no competition.

True enough but that is not the issue here. The question really is "who should pay for the added infrastructure required to support the ISPs higher Netflix bandwidth requirements?".

The ISP wants customers. Customers want 4K. Netflix wants 4K. The ISP can't provide 4K without added hardware, software and people. Who pays?

15 posted on 04/25/2014 6:29:14 AM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: InterceptPoint

Can’t we just go back to antenna TV and DVD’s? FWIW, I do not put the cable TV companies in the list of who deserves saving.


16 posted on 04/25/2014 6:34:02 AM PDT by grania
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To: SoFloFreeper

Public comments. Ha, hogwash. Strictly for PR. It’s not that they care what the public wishes as they are looking at the money. As always, follow the money. Follow the yellow brick road. It’s paved with gold.


17 posted on 04/25/2014 6:48:54 AM PDT by bgill
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To: FreedomPoster

So instead what you’ll have is Comcast’s regulation of the internet.


18 posted on 04/25/2014 7:04:16 AM PDT by babble-on
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To: FreedomPoster

So instead what you’ll have is Comcast’s regulation of the internet.


19 posted on 04/25/2014 7:04:16 AM PDT by babble-on
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To: grania

20 posted on 04/25/2014 7:31:55 AM PDT by Bikkuri (Molon Labe)
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To: SoFloFreeper
"Cronyism....now the FCC will be able to control what "news" you get on the 'net....."

That's an unfounded assertion and not how the internet works.

All this allows is somebody like Netflix can pay extra for expedited transfer of their data over privately owned networks.

It will be the best action taken by the FCC in at least a decade.

It will spark new services and higher bandwidth.

21 posted on 04/25/2014 10:30:55 AM PDT by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
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To: InterceptPoint; All
"Maybe someone who really understands this issue can explain how a pure Net Neutrality system would handle a Netflix decision to convert all their movies to 4K putting huge pressure on the ISPs to handle the increased bandwidth requirements for a single content provider."

First of all, quit falling for the leftist, govt control of the internet propaganda!

Today, a company like Netflix or Googl can overwhelm the backbone and access provider with THEIR traffic. Arbitrarily they can increase the bandwidth requirements to deliver their content.

Sure, the ISP/Backbone provider can charge them more based upon the amount of traffic they generate, but with the interconnected matrix of the internet, that has ripple effects all the way from the source to the end users.

ISP have very limited ability to recover the additional costs of network upgrade to accommodate this surge in demand.

What you end up with is Netflix and Google consuming the vast majority of available BW...and worse...diminishing the prospects of delivering their content effectively.

Want TRUE HD video over the internet? Only by allowing the content provider to pay extra for that complex and expensive upgrade will you see it delivered effectively and reliably.

Want innovation and new services? Same thing.

22 posted on 04/25/2014 10:47:42 AM PDT by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
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To: Mariner
Want TRUE HD video over the internet? Only by allowing the content provider to pay extra for that complex and expensive upgrade will you see it delivered effectively and reliably.

Agreed. Exactly right.

So is that in accordance with "Net Neutrality". Or is it the opposite?

23 posted on 04/25/2014 10:55:14 AM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: InterceptPoint
"So is that in accordance with "Net Neutrality". Or is it the opposite?"

The original "net neutrality" prevented that. This new, proposed rule allows it.

In fact it would be good to eliminate ALL FCC involvement in the internet and allow both the content providers and the carriers to achieve their own market equilibrium based on market forces, not government interference picking winners and losers.

24 posted on 04/25/2014 11:01:57 AM PDT by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
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To: Mariner

hmm. had not thought of that. Good point.

Would it not also allow net providers to tell Free Republic they had to pay to be permitted on “their” ‘net, though, while allowing Democratic Underground free access?

Or Comcast, owned by NBC, disallowing Fox News on their “net”?

Just askin’.


25 posted on 04/25/2014 11:28:31 AM PDT by SoFloFreeper
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To: Buckeye McFrog

Please see my questions on post 25. If I am wrong about this, let me know.

Generally speaking, I agree with you that government regulation is to be avoided, which is why I oppose the FCC’s proposal....how am I missing the boat?


26 posted on 04/25/2014 11:31:20 AM PDT by SoFloFreeper
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To: SoFloFreeper
Text-based sites on the internet are "incidental traffic" consuming less than 3% of all traffic.

Besides, what provider would want to force users to a competitor to get what they want?

Jim could probably answer this better, but I would be surprised if the FR servers consume even 100mbs of outbound traffic.

Netflix and Google generate steady flows of up to 10+gbs and peak much higher than that.

27 posted on 04/25/2014 1:07:23 PM PDT by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
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To: Mariner
The original "net neutrality" prevented that. This new, proposed rule allows it.

Thanks. That's what I thought. Nice to get some confirmation.

28 posted on 04/25/2014 1:31:16 PM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: InterceptPoint

As my business partner likes to remind me, “We get our money from just one place...our customers.” The customer pays. The question is about how to go about getting the money out of the customers hand.

The monopoly agreements influence that process. If my local government will not allow my ISP to charge me more for higher bandwidths then maybe the ISP can get Netflix to pay it. Of course Netflix in turn will charge me.


29 posted on 04/25/2014 4:24:57 PM PDT by FreedomNotSafety
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To: FreedomNotSafety
If my local government will not allow my ISP to charge me more for higher bandwidths

Say what? Every ISP charges more for higher bandwidth (e.g. $X/mo for a 5Mbps connection, $X+Y/mo for a 20Mbps connection, etc).

If (for example) Netflix starts serving up high-definition video, the people with slower connections will have lots of pauses and stutters because they didn't buy enough bandwidth, and thus will be motivated to upgrade their connections (and pay the ISP more money) or do without (and reduce the ISP's bandwidth needs). If customers already purchased connections with enough bandwidth to watch high-definition video and the ISP can't handle the load... well, it sucks to be them, just as it sucked to be Max Bialystock when the house of cards fell down on him.

30 posted on 05/02/2014 7:56:56 AM PDT by Flame Retardant (If you analyze it I believe the very heart and soul of conservatism is libertarianism: Ronald Reagan)
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To: Flame Retardant

Good point. I think I am confusing bandwidth with total usage. The ISP will sell you all the band width you want but they have practical if unstated limits on how much you can utilize that bandwidth to the max. It is particularly acute on the wireless providers but even the cable providers cannot give everyone maximum bandwidth all the time. Try getting a high bandwidth then utilize it to the max. On most cable ISPs a few people can get away with but if too many try it everything slows down.


31 posted on 05/02/2014 10:39:11 AM PDT by FreedomNotSafety
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