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Women Not in Labor Force Hits Record High
cnsnews.com ^ | May 2, 2014 | Ali Meyer

Posted on 05/03/2014 5:25:48 AM PDT by ilovesarah2012

(CNSNews.com) - The number of women 16 and older not in the labor force climbed to a record high of 55,116,000 in April, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

This means that there were 55,116,000 women 16 and older who were in the civilian nonsinstitutional population who not only did not have a job, they did not actively seek one in the last four weeks. That is up 428,000 from the 54,688,000 women who were not in the labor force in March.

In April, according to BLS, the labor force participation rate for women was 56.9 percent, down from 57.2 percent in March. The labor force participation rate, as calculated by the BLS, is based on the civilian non-institutional population, which is the number of people in the country 16 or older who are not in the military or an institution.

The labor force participation rate is the percentage of this population that either has a job or actively sought one in the last four weeks.

(Excerpt) Read more at cnsnews.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: trends; women; workforce

1 posted on 05/03/2014 5:25:48 AM PDT by ilovesarah2012
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To: ilovesarah2012

Bring back jobs to America.

Stop sending US jobs to China.

China now produces more than America produces, that continues to grow rapidly, and America imports a whole heck of a lot of that.

America needs to make things here.


2 posted on 05/03/2014 5:29:56 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html#2013)
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To: Cringing Negativism Network

America makes plenty of things here. Unfortunately, those jobs are never coming back. Even if you shut down every factory in China and moved all of them back here, they’d be so heavily automated that: (1) there would hardly be any impact on the U.S. economy at all, and (2) the jobs gained in manufacturing would be largely offset by job losses in logistics, longshoremen, etc.


3 posted on 05/03/2014 5:35:14 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Alberta's Child

I (strongly) disagree.

America needs jobs.

Jobs. We need to bring back US jobs from China and the world.

Now.


4 posted on 05/03/2014 5:37:05 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html#2013)
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To: ilovesarah2012

tell us again who was hosting the War on Women? /rhetorical


5 posted on 05/03/2014 5:40:07 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (Operating out of weakness? Imagine if he was working from a position of strength!)
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To: Cringing Negativism Network

You can disagree all you want. It ain’t happening, no matter how many times you rant about it. The days of having 4,000 men walk down the hill every morning to a Bethlehem Steel mill in Pennsylvania or a Ford plant in Michigan are never coming back.


6 posted on 05/03/2014 5:40:33 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: ilovesarah2012
The number of women 16 and older not in the labor force climbed to a record high of 55,116,000
Yes, the total number is high, but what is it as a percentage of the population (325 million) - 17%?
What was that percentage back in the 50 and 60s? Probably closer to 25% or higher.
7 posted on 05/03/2014 5:43:06 AM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Alberta's Child

We fundamentally disagree.

America needs, American jobs.


8 posted on 05/03/2014 5:43:09 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html#2013)
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To: ilovesarah2012

This is why we need comprehensive immigration reform. /jeb


9 posted on 05/03/2014 5:43:49 AM PDT by Oldeconomybuyer (The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money.)
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To: Alberta's Child; Cringing Negativism Network

You are right. Those jobs are not coming back but there are manufacturing jobs here. I live in Upstate SC and we have a lot of manufacturing jobs. Probably not as many as the heyday but really good jobs. Of course, SC is right to work and we have a Republican governor.

U.S. Industrial Manufacturers Optimistic Regarding Domestic and World Economic Outlook for 2014, According to PwC’s Manufacturing Barometer

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/23/ny-pwc-manufacturers-idUSnPnNYlsZkj+164+PRN20140123


10 posted on 05/03/2014 5:45:40 AM PDT by ilovesarah2012
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To: Alberta's Child

I get your point about automation, but even if we went from 4,000 jobs in the past to about 500 today for the same factory, that would still be 500 workers paying taxes into our system and for our military instead of China’s.


11 posted on 05/03/2014 5:46:40 AM PDT by TwelveOfTwenty (See my home page for some of my answers to the left's talking points.)
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To: ilovesarah2012

America has leaned far too heavily on China.

Last year America sold China 122 billion dollars of goods and services.

Last year China sold America 440 billion dollars of goods and services.

America needs to make stuff, right here.

China now produces more than America produces.

Bring back America production. Now.


12 posted on 05/03/2014 5:48:30 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html#2013)
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To: Cringing Negativism Network

The Constitution spells out the federal governments limited powers; providing jobs is NOT one of them. It’s not the governments duty to provide jobs, and candidates who argue job creation programs will never get my vote. However, if government were trimmed to its Constitutional limits we would have more jobs, because the oppressive cost of compliance with government regulations would drop and businesses developed here could be competitive again. Businesses are not motivated by some conspiracy to destroy America, they are motivated by profit; due to compliance costs and uncertainty introduced by things like ObamaCare it does not currently make much sense to make things here.


13 posted on 05/03/2014 5:51:40 AM PDT by LambSlave
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To: LambSlave

Our government is completely sold out to foreign manufacturing.

Completely.

Bring back American manufacturing. Now.


14 posted on 05/03/2014 5:53:03 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html#2013)
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To: Cringing Negativism Network

America needs more women to stay home, give birth, and raise kids.

We are approaching demographic suicide. Just like Russia.


15 posted on 05/03/2014 6:10:45 AM PDT by heye2monn (MO)
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To: ilovesarah2012

Good.

Back home, barefoot, pregnant and in the kitchen.

Not working and paying taxes.

Time to starve the beast.


16 posted on 05/03/2014 6:14:04 AM PDT by x1stcav ("The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.")
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To: TwelveOfTwenty
And for most industries those 500 workers are right here in the U.S. now. That doesn't address the problem of what to do with the other 3,500.

It's not foreign competition that has eliminated these American jobs. It's the never-ending search for improvements in efficiency that drives the push for automation.

17 posted on 05/03/2014 6:18:46 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Cringing Negativism Network
How many employees have you hired in the last five years?
18 posted on 05/03/2014 6:19:41 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Alberta's Child

No sorry to argue with you but it is Chinese competition.

China makes far too much of what America buys.

China is making too much. America needs to return manufacturing to America.


19 posted on 05/03/2014 6:20:37 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html#2013)
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To: Alberta's Child
And for most industries those 500 workers are right here in the U.S. now. That doesn't address the problem of what to do with the other 3,500.

We buy stuff made here instead of in China, that addresses the 3,500.

It's not foreign competition that has eliminated these American jobs. It's the never-ending search for improvements in efficiency that drives the push for automation.

Actually, it's both. The latter is OK, because technology has eliminated some jobs but created others.

Foreign competition? The choice is creating tax payers in the US paying for our infrastructure and our military, or creating tax payers in China paying for China's infrastructure and military.

20 posted on 05/03/2014 6:30:22 AM PDT by TwelveOfTwenty (See my home page for some of my answers to the left's talking points.)
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To: TwelveOfTwenty
There isn't enough demand here in the U.S. to support many of these industries. And the demand would actually decline if the cost of producing those things here is higher than elsewhere.

There's no easy answer to this. To me, the most important thing is to look at it from several different angles and understand what the primary objective is. Here's a simple case in point:

1. Do we want full employment here in the U.S.?

2. Do we want a high standard of living here in the U.S.?

3. Do we want to be free citizens here in the U.S.?

I present these two basic questions because it's important to understand that we may not be able to do all three of these at the same time.

21 posted on 05/03/2014 6:43:30 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Alberta's Child

Sorry — that’s THREE basic questions. LOL.


22 posted on 05/03/2014 6:45:12 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: ilovesarah2012

I was told many years ago that if I did not vote for liberals, women would be stuck at home and never be able to fulfill their potential in the workplace. I didn’t vote for liberals, and that’s just what happened.


23 posted on 05/03/2014 6:53:20 AM PDT by chajin ("There is no other name under heaven given among people by which we must be saved." Acts 4:12)
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To: ilovesarah2012

The real war on women brought to you by Obama.


24 posted on 05/03/2014 7:01:40 AM PDT by manic4organic (It was nice knowing you, America.)
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To: Alberta's Child
We can do all three if US jobs go to US citizens and our economy is more isolated from the outside world. We shouldn't trade with any country unless it's a "win" for us. Cheap Chinese goods have not been that. We should not have jobs going to non-citizens if there are qualified US citizens. No one who refuses a job or refuses to funcition at it should get any kind of benefits.

But no, the way the game is rigged today we can't have all three.

25 posted on 05/03/2014 7:09:36 AM PDT by grania
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To: Alberta's Child
I see it this way.

Buying American means more US tax payers paying into our infrastructure and the military that preserves that freedom you mentioned. It also means fewer unemployed collecting the taxes that could otherwise have paid for all of this.

Buying Chinese means more Chinese tax payers paying for China's infrastructure and military with American money. It means having fewer American tax payers who will have to pay a higher share of supporting our infrastructure and military. It also means that money that could have paid for our infrastructure and military was siphoned off to pay for unemployment benefits instead, paid for by, again, fewer American tax payers.

Considering all of this, saving $.25 on a Chinese made towel doesn't sound like such a bargain after all.

26 posted on 05/03/2014 7:17:11 AM PDT by TwelveOfTwenty (See my home page for some of my answers to the left's talking points.)
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To: ilovesarah2012

Perhaps this is related to a local story I heard recently where in some areas daycare costs as much as state universities. If you have to make over $9,000 a year just to break even on the daycare, then you have to make significantly more than that to just break even on transportation, addition food costs (eating out vs in for breakfast/lunch and even dinner), wardrobe (more clothes, professional clothes), convenience (you pay more for convenience when both parents work than you do when one stays home and can DIY more), etc. I remember when my now-teens were toddlers and the break-even point for local working moms was right around $10,000, though I imagine it’s way more than that now.

Anyway, on that new story they interviewed a local lady who claimed to feel fortunately that she made “a little more than that” (”that” being their cost for daycare), not realizing that after all those *other* expenses are added in, she was probably well shy of breaking even by working outside the home. Pity, but trust me—the locals are not known for their math skills.


27 posted on 05/03/2014 7:17:52 AM PDT by MWFsFreedom
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To: grania
Trust me -- there's no way to have all three of these simultaneously. The biggest obstacle to your vision of utopian prosperity isn't "cheap Chinese goods" ... it's the insatiable hunger of the U.S. consumer who wants the highest standard of living in the history of mankind but doesn't want to pay for it.

That's exactly what's driving all of these economic/financial problems that ripple through the entire U.S. economy: $18 trillion in national debt, enormous trade deficits, and a debt-fueled economy built on a house of cards.

28 posted on 05/03/2014 7:21:49 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: TwelveOfTwenty
I agree with most of what you've said here. My point isn't that trade with China is a good idea. My point is that it's almost unavoidable with the economy we've built for ourselves here at home.

I disagree, though, with the idea of the U.S. military preserving our freedom. An armed and responsible citizenry preserves our freedom. Our military is largely used to enforce our presence throughout a global empire.

29 posted on 05/03/2014 7:24:48 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Alberta's Child
the biggest obstacle is the insatiable hunger of the US consumer

Those US consumers with that insatiable hunger tend to be swayed quite easily by advertising. If there were tarrifs on cheap foreign goods and advertising worked at making consumers desire high-quality hand made or factory made in the USA goods, that's what people would want. Instead, advertisers are hawking cheap goods that won't last, and besides that, the ptb collect fortunes from licensing, shipping, and high profit margins.

It's very doable. People need to prize an evening out with their family at a local restaurant more than buying a new outfit made in China that will only be worn once. It can be done.

30 posted on 05/03/2014 7:29:26 AM PDT by grania
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To: MWFsFreedom
You raise an excellent point, and it goes to an issue that I've thought about for years.

I use a phrase called "the monetization of the family" to make the point that a lot of what we've seen in the last 50 years as "economic growth" is a complete fiction. The nation's gross domestic product (GDP) is the sum total of all goods and services purchased/sold in any given period of time.

I don't have even a vague estimate for this (and it might be a great subject for research in a PhD. program in economics), but I'm certain that there is a sizeable portion of our national GDP today that is comprised of economic transactions that didn't even exist 50 years ago because they involve things that people used to do themselves instead of hiring someone else to do them. Child care is a huge one, and landscaping is another that immediately comes to mind. It's kind of strange that if I mow my own lawn it doesn't show up anywhere in our economic figures, but if I hire someone else it suddenly shows up in the nation's GDP.

31 posted on 05/03/2014 7:31:38 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: grania

At least now you’re seeing that changing consumer attitudes is critical to this. Good luck with that.


32 posted on 05/03/2014 7:33:42 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: ilovesarah2012

War on Women


33 posted on 05/03/2014 7:34:36 AM PDT by redangus
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To: heye2monn
We are approaching demographic suicide.

There you go again with your "war on women"...we just need immigration reform(legalization)to fill the void..."keep your rosaries out of our ovaries!" /s

34 posted on 05/03/2014 7:39:47 AM PDT by RckyRaCoCo (Shall Not Be Infringed)
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To: Alberta's Child

We’ll have to agree to disagree on those points then.


35 posted on 05/03/2014 7:43:12 AM PDT by TwelveOfTwenty (See my home page for some of my answers to the left's talking points.)
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To: TwelveOfTwenty

Of course. It’s a very complicated issue and isn’t easy to address. There are lots of excellent posts on these threads on all sides of the issue.


36 posted on 05/03/2014 7:55:27 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Cringing Negativism Network

Perhaps we need to stop buying so much Chinese made products.


37 posted on 05/03/2014 8:47:21 AM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: Alberta's Child
For me it's easy. I can keep jobs here, or create them in China. I can create American tax payers to fund our military, or I can create Chinese tax payers to fund China's. I can fund our infrastructure, or China's. I can pay Americans to collect unemployment, or I can pay Americans to work and let the Chinese worry about how they'll pay their unemployed.

There is nothing complex about it.

38 posted on 05/03/2014 9:26:39 AM PDT by TwelveOfTwenty (See my home page for some of my answers to the left's talking points.)
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To: TwelveOfTwenty
I'll ask you the same question I posted to a previous poster on this thread:

How many American employees have you hired in the last five years?

39 posted on 05/03/2014 10:04:37 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Alberta's Child

>>There isn’t enough demand here in the U.S. to support many of these industries.<<

This is a catch 22 & a downward spiral. We have had all three of these things. In the 1960s, unemployment was around or at 4%. (source here

http://elcoushistory.tripod.com/economics1960.html

Our standard of living was the highest it’s ever been. We were magnitudes more free than we are now. We were far more secure, individually & as a country.
Far fewer women worked outside the home (a good thing, imho, children or not). Society was better off. The economy was better off.

Every woman (maybe unless she is self-employed) who “does a man’s job” doesn’t only hurt “a man”. She hurts a family- of every race & every social scale. It’s one thing if she is the sole provider, therefore necessary, or takes on leading the family business- but much of this is strictly driven by ego. That’s every bit as bad as the “Wall Street Bankers”. Just because someone *can* do something, doesn’t mean they should.

There are a lot of contributing factors, but foreign trade is an enormous one. We throw our stuff away not only when it “breaks”, but because we want “the latest thing”/ “new & improved” (which it often isn’t). Sometimes, that’s a really stupid thing to do. Wasteful.

We have killed- or just about killed, the “Golden Goose”. SOMEBODY, somewhere has the brains & the talent to figure out how to sort this out. Or is it just laziness?
There’s not much that hard, hard work & dogged determination can’t make happen- even in spite of lacking experience & knowledge. It’s all about will.

It’s not the government’s purpose to provide people with jobs, but they did facilitate our jobs being moved overseas. We help by continuing to buy those products (& now, services; like “tech support”- which sucks) from overseas, rather than shifting our patronage to American made only. The government (local to federal) puts every imaginable obstacle & hassle in the path of American business but greases the skids for third world production. That’s bass-ackwards.
We’re broke & we’re buying CRAP (sometimes literally. Check your grocery labels).

/rant off
just 1 woman’s opinion, humble or not


40 posted on 05/03/2014 10:43:35 AM PDT by KGeorge (Till we're together again, Gypsy girl. May 28, 1998- June 3, 2013)
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To: RckyRaCoCo

Your sarcasm pretty well sums up the liberal talking points. :-)


41 posted on 05/03/2014 11:59:56 AM PDT by heye2monn (MO)
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To: Alberta's Child
Since I'm not an employer, none, directly.

However, I did buy an American made care from an American manufacturer. Although I had to hold my nose over the UAW label (and I won't fault anyone for refusing to do likewise), that helped save a few jobs.

I've also managed to find made in USA clothes during that time span. What else? Tires made in USA. Software manufactured in the USA. I can't put a jobs created number on that, but it all helps to keep jobs in the US. And I don't see my personal finances as being any worse off because of it.

42 posted on 05/04/2014 5:49:47 AM PDT by TwelveOfTwenty (See my home page for some of my answers to the left's talking points.)
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To: TwelveOfTwenty
That's kind of my point. It's nothing personal, but I've found over the years that the strongest "bring American jobs back" arguments on threads like this come from people who don't run a business, who don't employ anyone, and who aren't subject to the competing pressures of paying employees well and meeting pricing demands of customers/clients that make it difficult to pay those employees well.

Like I said ... it's a very difficult issue, and it isn't going to be "fixed" anytime soon.

43 posted on 05/04/2014 6:48:40 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: KGeorge
All good points, but your reference to the 1960s points to part of the problem. The 1960s wasn't a "normal" period in history by any stretch. In fact, it was very much an anomaly in which the U.S. standard of living was much higher than the rest of the world because we were the only major industrial power to emerge from World War II with our infrastructure and industrial capacity unharmed.

The next few decades really just saw the rest of the world catching up, that's all.

44 posted on 05/04/2014 6:50:38 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Alberta's Child

That’s the story, anyway. Respectfully, I really think it is more than that. What we had was “sustainable” (I hate that word, but it applies). What we’re doing now is not (obviously).

Where we went off the rails was all this globalization stuff. There were plenty of imports & they were cheap. Many were quite dependable- German/ Scandinavian furniture, Toyota to name two. That was fine.
The problem was when American companies began contracting & literally moving their production overseas. I was in my early 20s when either Levis or Farah moved their manufacturing to the Caribbean. I was apolitical & didn’t have a brain in my head, but even I knew it wasn’t a good thing. I felt betrayed. Then, the price went up & the quality went down. I haven’t bought Levis in years.
Here’s the rub: those other countries now have the income to purchase/ support the things *they* produce. We have high unemployment, so we do not.
The whole US is becoming Detroit. I don’t think that’s hyperbole. It’s simple logic.

Now, I have to search- hard, to even get produce grown in the US. Last week, I gave up on getting onions. Onions. In Texas (& I am Really. Ticked.) I get mad every time “Bob” or “Susie” answer the customer service phone & it’s clear they don’t understand a word I’m saying. And I often give it up & muddle through on my own (if I can).
But this is wrong. Our country is collapsing around our ears & we’re getting ripped off. I can’t just say “Oh well. This s just the way it is”. It didn’t happen “naturally”. There was/ is a concerted effort to *invest* in these *other countries” & throw our own away.

I may do without, but I am not going along.


45 posted on 05/04/2014 8:15:00 AM PDT by KGeorge (Till we're together again, Gypsy girl. May 28, 1998- June 3, 2013)
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To: Alberta's Child

I figured that was your point, but my point is that I made it profitable for the companies that manufacture here by buying their products. It’s very simple, we made it profitable to outsource by buying the cheaper foreign made products, and we can make it profitable to make them here by buying them.


46 posted on 05/04/2014 8:45:36 AM PDT by TwelveOfTwenty (See my home page for some of my answers to the left's talking points.)
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