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Man freed in Missouri delayed imprisonment case
KC Star ^ | May 5, 2014 | JIM SALTER

Posted on 05/05/2014 11:04:37 AM PDT by Second Amendment First

A man convicted of robbery in 2000 but never sent to prison until last year because of a clerical mistake walked free Monday after a judge lauded his "exemplary" behavior during 13 years of freedom. uncredited | AP Cornealious Anderson ‹ › More News

Craig Robinson fired by Oregon State Health care law-Holocaust comparison criticized Utah police seize furniture in dead babies case Police probe reports of shots at Ohio VA hospital Texas grand jury shooting simulator stirs debate

Read more National News

Cornealious "Mike" Anderson dabbed tears from his eyes as the judge announced his decision during a hearing that lasted just 10 minutes. Anderson left the courtroom with his wife and 3-year-old daughter on one arm and his mom on the other.

Anderson was 23 when he was sentenced to 13 years in prison for his role in the robbery of a fast-food restaurant's assistant manager. He told The Associated Press last month that he waited, and even asked about going to prison, but the order never came.

(Excerpt) Read more at kansascity.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS:
I commend the judge. This man is reformed.
1 posted on 05/05/2014 11:04:37 AM PDT by Second Amendment First
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To: Second Amendment First

Better editing (whoops)

A man convicted of robbery in 2000 but never sent to prison until last year because of a clerical mistake walked free Monday after a judge lauded his “exemplary” behavior during 13 years of freedom.

Cornealious “Mike” Anderson dabbed tears from his eyes as the judge announced his decision during a hearing that lasted just 10 minutes. Anderson left the courtroom with his wife and 3-year-old daughter on one arm and his mom on the other.

Anderson was 23 when he was sentenced to 13 years in prison for his role in the robbery of a fast-food restaurant’s assistant manager. He told The Associated Press last month that he waited, and even asked about going to prison, but the order never came.


2 posted on 05/05/2014 11:06:49 AM PDT by Second Amendment First
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To: Second Amendment First

The man he robbed thought he should be a free man.


3 posted on 05/05/2014 11:08:09 AM PDT by Second Amendment First
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To: Second Amendment First

Justice is served!


4 posted on 05/05/2014 11:09:06 AM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: Second Amendment First
Craig Robinson fired by Oregon State Health care law-Holocaust comparison criticized Utah police seize furniture in dead babies case Police probe reports of shots at Ohio VA hospital Texas grand jury shooting simulator stirs debate

Can you translate this for me?

5 posted on 05/05/2014 11:09:17 AM PDT by Hot Tabasco (Under Reagan spring always arrived on time.....)
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To: Second Amendment First

Prison was in order for an armed robbery, but living 13 years waiting for the hammer to drop is its own punishment. As long a no one was hurt in the crime I see no sense in sending a reformed, productive man to jail.


6 posted on 05/05/2014 11:11:20 AM PDT by RightOnTheBorder
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To: Hot Tabasco
Can you translate this for me?

quite possibly written by an automated journalist. Or one that stayed up too late last night...

7 posted on 05/05/2014 11:15:00 AM PDT by rjsimmon (The Tree of Liberty Thirsts)
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To: Second Amendment First

Thanks for posting this.

It makes me very happy that the judge had enough common sense to do what was right. :-)


8 posted on 05/05/2014 11:15:15 AM PDT by Bobalu (What cannot be programmed cannot be physics)
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FR thread on the topic from April 17, 2014 when the mistake was found

Armed robber was never told to report to prison


9 posted on 05/05/2014 11:16:16 AM PDT by deport
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To: RightOnTheBorder

During his long purgatory he still continued to build a constructive family life. Prison isn’t going to reform him.


10 posted on 05/05/2014 11:17:05 AM PDT by Second Amendment First
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To: Second Amendment First
I guess we should not put anyone that has been convicted of a violent crime in prison for at least a decade. If they are not convicted of any serious crimes in that time they're free to go.

Think of the money we'll save!/sarc

11 posted on 05/05/2014 11:26:34 AM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Second Amendment First

What is the goal of incarceration? I think that justice is better served when a man commits to admitting the severity of his crime and shows by his actions that he rejects the crime and would never do it again.

This incident has saved the state a lot of money. Has there ever been restitution of the victim?

I applaud the freeing of this man.


12 posted on 05/05/2014 12:07:11 PM PDT by theBuckwheat
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To: Hot Tabasco

Copy and paste picked up title links to other stories on the site.


13 posted on 05/05/2014 12:17:09 PM PDT by Bob
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To: Second Amendment First

He was sentenced to time not served.


14 posted on 05/05/2014 12:48:30 PM PDT by Defiant (Let the Tea Party win, and we will declare peace on the American people and go home.)
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To: Second Amendment First

Outstanding!


15 posted on 05/05/2014 12:50:04 PM PDT by ButThreeLeftsDo (Support Free Republic!!!)
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To: Eagles6
I guess we should not put anyone that has been convicted of a violent crime in prison for at least a decade.

Obviously, we have prison for a reason, and we would never do this, because the vast majority of those in prison are there because they are dangerous, and we don't want them around. They are supposed to be rehabilitated and learn their lesson, but in reality, they usually don't. The thing that usually stops a young hoodlum from continuing to commit crime is growing old.

However, in this case, my initial reaction is that the state has forfeited its right to incarcerate this defendant, who happened to be one of the few who turned his life around on a dime. When he was sentenced, he was a 23 year old kid who would have been out at 37, or maybe sooner if they get time off for good behavior in Missouri. He was available and never fled or hid, and they didn't put him in prison during all those 13 years. Now, he is 37, with a family and a life, and it would be cruel to force him to serve those 13 years NOW, having him in prison until age 50, separating from that life that he built while they failed to put him behind bars.

The penalty now would be something far harsher than the original sentence. You can't impose it on him now, to do so would be cruel. In my opinion.

In the case of the woman who escaped prison in Michigan, went to San Diego, changed her name and had a family, I think there is a distinction. Namely, that she escaped and hid. It was her fault, not the state's, that she did not finish out her sentence. If having a good life after escape allowed a person to avoid their sentence, then prisoners might as well escape at will and give it a go.

In that case, justice was served by forcing her back to Michigan, putting her in prison, but letting her out after a suitable interval had passed (I think they let her out after 6 months or a year, instead of making her serve out her entire sentence.) One factor making that just is that the laws she was in prison for had changed drastically. I think it was a small amount of marijuana she had, and she got a 20 year sentence that would today be a misdemeanor with no prison time.

16 posted on 05/05/2014 1:09:26 PM PDT by Defiant (Let the Tea Party win, and we will declare peace on the American people and go home.)
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To: Eagles6

“I guess we should not put anyone that has been convicted of a violent crime in prison for at least a decade. If they are not convicted of any serious crimes in that time they’re free to go.”

We do that all the time depending on the circumstances. It’s called probation. Probation for armed robbery isn’t typical, but it isn’t exactly rare either, happens quite a bit with young first time offenders.

Regardless of that, I don’t see any justification at all for sending a man with 4 kids, his own business, and an otherwise clean record back to prison on the taxpayer’s dime, because of a government clerical error. I’m good.


17 posted on 05/05/2014 1:14:41 PM PDT by Blackyce (French President Jacques Chirac: "As far as I'm concerned, war always means failure.")
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To: Eagles6

What would your just action be? This man never hid where he was. He never tried to keep from going to prison. The court just overlooked him. So he waited. And waited.

Now that they have discovered the oversight, he was arrested. But if he had served all of that term, he would be free now anyway.

So tell me, would justice be served if he now spent 13 years in prison? If so, please define what you believe to be the purpose of prison and what you believe justice consists of.


18 posted on 05/05/2014 1:49:38 PM PDT by Anitius Severinus Boethius (www.wilsonharpbooks.com - Eclipse, the sequel to Bright Horizons is out! Get it now!)
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To: theBuckwheat
What is the goal of incarceration?

Prison isn't cheap and personally, I believe the goal of incarceration should be to protect society from violent, sociopathic predators, not to destroy people.

Sending this guy to prison would not have protected society and would have basically turned him from a tax-paying producer into a ward of the state, his family included.

I hope he can recover his livelihood.

19 posted on 05/05/2014 6:58:41 PM PDT by Drew68
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To: Second Amendment First; Defiant; Blackyce
I'll answer all posts at once and keep Second Amendment First in the loop.

23 yrs old is not a kid. He was a grown man when he committed a violent armed robbery.

I am extremely disturbed that this man has been turned into a hero. So he turned his life around. Good for him and society, but that's what he should have been doing instead of armed robberies.

I would need far more information than is provided by the msm. That they judiciously state that he hadn't been convicted of a serious crime prior to the robbery puts me on alert.

Why didn't he contact authorities? I can understand why, I probably wouldn't either. If he did in fact ask his lawyer and the lawyer told him to keep quiet then the lawyer is partly at fault for his predicament.

If, in fact, this story is completely true as reported, which I doubt there should still be punishment for the crime.

Prison is not rehabilitation, it is punishment.

Community service, house arrest, weekends in jail.

Again, this man committed a violent criminal act and punishment is appropriate. He is not a hero and is not being oppressdd by da man.

20 posted on 05/05/2014 7:06:07 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Eagles6

We’ll have to disagree. When someone wants to take something from me, even if I owe it to them, they have to file the proper legal proceeding, and if they fail to in the proper time, they forfeit their right, through the statute of limitations, to get what I owe them. In my opinion, though there is no statute of limitations on how long the government has to come get you after they convict you, the same principle applies. They leave you alone for 13 years, and now want to take away your family that happened in the interim, to me, they blew it. I can understand the other viewpoint, I just don’t think that it is just.


21 posted on 05/05/2014 8:08:18 PM PDT by Defiant (Let the Tea Party win, and we will declare peace on the American people and go home.)
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To: Anitius Severinus Boethius

See post # 20. The purpose of prison is punishment. I would need far more info than what has been given so far by the msm. I thought Freepers would know by now that the left does not report the true story or the whole story.


22 posted on 05/05/2014 8:23:31 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Eagles6

Yes, it must be a media conspiracy to hide a reason to justify to everyone your insistence that he be sent to prison. I mean, he just MUST have done something. It’s inconceivable that he could have actually lived an upstanding life, right?


23 posted on 05/05/2014 8:51:10 PM PDT by Bubba Ho-Tep ("The rat always knows when he's in with weasels"-- Tom Waits)
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To: Bubba Ho-Tep
Why don't you actually read my posts then get back to me.

BTW there actually IS a leftist media conspiracy. It's been mentioned once or twice here on FR.

24 posted on 05/05/2014 8:58:07 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Eagles6
I know you find the facts in this article lacking, but, in response to your question:

Why didn't he contact authorities?

From the article:

He told The Associated Press last month that he waited, and even asked about going to prison, but the order never came

According to this he did contact them.

There are statutes of limitations on taking action for crimes, filing lawsuits. In this case, if the government couldn't get it together for 13 years - their loss.

25 posted on 05/05/2014 9:01:06 PM PDT by ican'tbelieveit
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To: Bubba Ho-Tep

And, Oh yeah, he did do something; armed robbery.


26 posted on 05/05/2014 9:01:14 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: ican'tbelieveit

According to the article he asked his lawyer. He was CONVICTED of violent crime. Statute of limitations, if there is one for armed robbery, shouldn’t be a factor.


27 posted on 05/05/2014 9:11:59 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Eagles6

There’s no law that says he’s obligated to remind them. They told him to wait. He waited.


28 posted on 05/05/2014 9:21:29 PM PDT by Bubba Ho-Tep ("The rat always knows when he's in with weasels"-- Tom Waits)
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To: Eagles6

Did you read the original article? It was linked in the responses here, I believe. He was told by the court to go home and wait for them to contact him about when he would be taken to prison to start serving his sentence.

He did. After a while, he inquired about when they would contact him. They told him to be patient. So he was. He went about his life for 13 years waiting for the day they would contact him and take him to prison.

Then one day, the SWAT team shows up and arrests him. Why? He wasn’t hiding. He wasn’t evading. He was just living a productive life and they sent SWAT.

Did they try to pick up a phone and call him and say “Hey, mind coming in? We have a spot open for you now?” No, they sent SWAT.

Did they think he was a flight risk? Clearly he wasn’t, he lived in the open where they could have contacted him.

Did they think he was dangerous? Clearly he wasn’t, he hadn’t been in trouble since his conviction.

So where was the justice at this point? The judge decided that he had reformed himself while living in the open in an open society.

I believe imprisonment should be for separating those who refuse to live in a civil society without breaking it’s laws. I don’t believe prison should be to punish or reform the criminal, I believe prison should be about protecting society. That’s why I don’t believe we should be releasing people from prison if we make it clear they cannot be trusted in society (i.e. registering sex offenders) nor should we be paroling people who have multiple violent offenses on their record.

But this guy? After 13 years, I would say that he is not a danger to society. Society will not be better protected by putting him in prison. So, to my mind, justice has been served already.


29 posted on 05/05/2014 9:26:24 PM PDT by Anitius Severinus Boethius (www.wilsonharpbooks.com - Eclipse, the sequel to Bright Horizons is out! Get it now!)
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To: Bubba Ho-Tep

And they finally got around to him.


30 posted on 05/05/2014 9:27:05 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Anitius Severinus Boethius
Do I think a SWAT team was warranted? No. Thank goodness they didn't shoot the family dog in front of the kids.

Let's just say I would rather do my own research than make a decision based on reporting from the leftist msm.

IF the story is as reported there should still be punishment for the crime.

IF he has led a blameless and upstanding life since the conviction I would think a sentence of time served would be justified along with 13 yrs of weekend talks to at risk teens that he could influence.

Why do you think I wanted him to go to jail for 13 yrs?

31 posted on 05/05/2014 9:49:47 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Eagles6

I think the article is confusing on that point.

But, seems he played by their rules and they screwed up. Errors by the government should ALWAYS favor citizens. Period.


32 posted on 05/05/2014 11:11:11 PM PDT by ican'tbelieveit
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To: Second Amendment First

Sentencing today has nothing to do with reforming....its about punishment and warehousing mostly

But like you I applaud the mercy...since appears merited


33 posted on 05/05/2014 11:23:37 PM PDT by wardaddy (we will not take back our way of life through peaceful means.....i have 5 kids....i fear for them)
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To: ican'tbelieveit

He committed a violent crime. He didn’t steal a car or a lawn ornament. They held a gun to someone’s head.


34 posted on 05/05/2014 11:32:30 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Eagles6

Don’t care what it was. If the government screws up, should always be in the citizen’s favor.

Just like if the government can’t prove your guilt in court. It is always in your favor. They have to go above and beyond to take away your right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

If the rule was for them to set a date for him to report to begin serving his sentence, and they messed up on the paperwork, there should be a limitation on how long they can come back and get you for it.


35 posted on 05/06/2014 5:12:17 AM PDT by ican'tbelieveit
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To: ican'tbelieveit

I’m happy for Anderson. Now, the system needs to address the millions of others who HAVE been convicted and served time but NEVER get rehabilitated. A person has to WANT to be “rehabbed”, going to prison to sit and watch TV, lift weights, play games and do absolutely NOTHING to improve himself is obviously NOT WORKING. That breed of losers will never learn.


36 posted on 05/06/2014 5:46:55 AM PDT by DaveA37
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To: Eagles6

______ always taking credit for stuff they supposed to do. “I pay my child support”. You supposed to support your kids, you low-expectation ________.....Chris Rock


37 posted on 05/06/2014 5:52:23 AM PDT by AppyPappy
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To: AppyPappy

;-)


38 posted on 05/06/2014 9:27:45 AM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: ican'tbelieveit

What if they raped your daughter? Would it be different then?


39 posted on 05/06/2014 4:42:30 PM PDT by Eagles6 (Valley Forge Redux. If not now, when? If not here, where?)
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To: Eagles6

liberals let emotions drive their decisions and actions. justice must be dispassionate.


40 posted on 05/06/2014 6:23:03 PM PDT by ican'tbelieveit
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To: Eagles6; ican'tbelieveit
What if they raped your daughter? Would it be different then?

I'm pretty sure that a father and mother would be keeping The Eye of Scrutiny upon the malefactor, regardless of what The Great Big Giant Farce Enlawment Machine was doing.

So, it's NOT the same.

41 posted on 05/08/2014 10:19:52 AM PDT by kiryandil (turning Americans into felons, one obnoxious drunk at a time (Zero Tolerance!!!))
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To: ican'tbelieveit; Eagles6
liberals let emotions drive their decisions and actions. justice must be dispassionate.

Excellent point.

Another thing is that I dislike them playing "Department of Corrections"/"Department of Punishment" when it suits them.

42 posted on 05/08/2014 10:24:03 AM PDT by kiryandil (turning Americans into felons, one obnoxious drunk at a time (Zero Tolerance!!!))
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