Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Israeli 3D Printing Company Offers Life-Saving Blood Recycling Machine at Fraction of the Cost
Shalom Life ^ | May 8, 2014 | Maya Yarowsky

Posted on 05/08/2014 8:50:31 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet

Stratasys has partnered with British company Brightwake to make the production of a blood collector machine 96% cheaper.

If you’re an avid reader of ours, you’ll know there are few things we love as much as 3D printing. From 3D-printed cars to 3D-printed shoes and art, we believe this technology will change the world. Now one of the world leaders in the realm of 3D printing, American-Israeli company Stratasys, has partnered with British company Brightwake (Advancis Medical) to make the production of a life-saving and religiously ethical blood collector significantly cheaper.

Hemosep is a one-of-a-kind machine that recovers blood lost or spilled during major trauma and open-heart surgeries, recycling the blood and allowing for its quick transfusion back into the patient. Known as autotransfusion, this process reduces the need for donor blood in a surgery and eliminates any possible complications tied to transfusion reactions. For religious individuals in particular who refuse donor blood, like 50 year-old Jehovah’s Witness UK heart patient Julie Penoyer, Hemosep’s blood recycling technology could be a real life-saver.

In order to create a successful prototype for Hemosep, the people at Brightwake turned to the Stratasys Dimension 1200es 3D printer to create models of some of the device’s central parts, like the filtration and cooling systems. “The Hemosep consists of a bag that uses chemical sponge technology and a mechanical agitator to concentrate blood sucked from a surgical site or drained from a heart-lung machine after surgery,” explains Brightwake’s Director of Research and Development, Steve Cotton. “The cells are then returned to the patient via blood transfusion. In a climate of blood shortage, this recycling methodology has the potential to be a game-changer in the medical industry, saving the National Health Service (NHS) millions,” Cotton continued.

“The future of medical device manufacturing”

With the desire to get the Hemosep’s live-saving blood recycling technology on the market sooner, Brightwake turned to 3D printed prototype parts to save time and money. Dramatically shortening a production process of three weeks for outsourced products, Brightwake’s in-house use of the Stratasys 3D printer saved the company time and cut its prototyping costs by an astonishing 96 percent, saving about £1000 per piece.

According to Cotton, “3D printing has not only enabled us to cut our own costs, it has also been crucial in actually getting a functional device to clinical trials. The ability to 3D print parts that look, feel and perform like the final product, on-the-fly, is the future of medical device manufacturing.”

Hemosep has already undergone successful clinical trials in over 100 open-heart surgery operations in Turkey and now the technology is being tested in the United Kingdom, primarily on religious patients who refuse the use of donor blood for major operations. While the final Hemosep system will be built from metal and not plastic (a reassuring fact), the need for accuracy, speed and accessibility is what made the creative medical company turn to Stratasys and 3D printing for help – deciding factors which may attract more in medical technology towards the use of printed prototypes.

“In the fast-paced, competitive medical industry, we are seeing more and more of our customers use 3D printing to bring their products to market more efficiently and cost-effectively,” says Andrew Middleton, Senior VP and General Manager of the European Medicines Agency. “The ability to turn ideas into functional products quickly is something that in the long-term we believe will improve the quality of care, and in some cases, save lives.”


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Israel; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: 3dprinters; 3dprinting; bloodmachine; bloodtransfusions; israel

1 posted on 05/08/2014 8:50:32 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: null and void

ping


2 posted on 05/08/2014 8:58:43 PM PDT by Fractal Trader
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fractal Trader

Thanks!


3 posted on 05/08/2014 9:17:50 PM PDT by null and void ( They don't think think they are above the law. They think they are the law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Fractal Trader; AFPhys; AD from SpringBay; ADemocratNoMore; aimhigh; AnalogReigns; archy; ...
3-D Printer Ping!


4 posted on 05/08/2014 9:18:40 PM PDT by null and void ( They don't think think they are above the law. They think they are the law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

Read carefully. “While the final Hemosep system will be built from metal and not plastic (a reassuring fact), the need for accuracy, speed and accessibility is what made the creative medical company turn to Stratasys and 3D printing for help – deciding factors which may attract more in medical technology towards the use of printed prototypes.”

This is yet another example of sensationalizing this technology. The fact that they used 3D printing to quickly build prototypes at a far lower cost than would have been possible with traditional hard tooling, and that this greatly reduced the cost and time to get the product into testing and ultimately onto the market is the story, and it’s well worth telling. A great successful application of 3D printing for rapid prototyping.

But this article would lead many readers to think the company will be 3D-printing components for the production machine, which is incorrect.

The first device I ever saw made with stereolithograpy back in 1988 was a medical device - a roller clamp flow controller for IV solutions at Baxter Labs. SLA enabled them to optimize the design through quick turnaround testing before committing to hard tooling, just as is the case here.


5 posted on 05/08/2014 9:19:18 PM PDT by bigbob (The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly. Abraham Lincoln)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

The irony is 3D printing and other technological breakthroughs will actually reduce the cost of healthcare for real, making the need for Obamacare, even if it actually worked, unnecessary. Free market wins again.


6 posted on 05/08/2014 9:35:45 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (Vote Republican! You can vote Democrat when you're dead...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw; Cachelot; Nix 2; veronica; Catspaw; knighthawk; Alouette; Optimist; weikel; Lent; GregB; ..
Middle East and terrorism, occasional political and Jewish issues Ping List. High Volume If you’d like to be on or off, please FR mail me.

..................

Should be noted the printer is making models, not the final machine. Still a big cost saving but the headline isn't clear. More echnology to be boycotted by Arabs and select Euros and Americans

7 posted on 05/09/2014 7:09:51 AM PDT by SJackson (the Democrats take back control, we don’t make (this) kind of naked power grab, J Biden)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: 2ndDivisionVet

This could save some BDS Troll’s Life.

But we will honor their commitment to boycott anything invented by the “Brutal Apartheid State”, and let ‘em croak.


8 posted on 05/09/2014 7:22:52 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: null and void

Whoa, bump it!!!


9 posted on 05/09/2014 7:16:07 PM PDT by 4Liberty (Optimal institutions - optimal economy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson