Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Best Years of Our Lives
Powerline Blog ^ | 05/26/2014 | Scott Johnson

Posted on 05/26/2014 9:34:41 AM PDT by DFG

When I walked into Spaulding Auditorium to see The Best Years of Our Lives as an undergrad, I had never even heard of the film. When I walked out three hours later, I couldn’t believe I had never heard of it. It is a great film with a lot of truth and a big heart in it. Tonight TCM is carrying the film as part of its Memorial Day lineup. It’s a movie every American should see. If you haven’t seen it yet, you might want to try to catch it tonight.

Mark Harris tells the highly improbable story behind the making of the film in Five Came Back, his terrific account of the prominent directors who volunteered to use their filmmaking skills in the armed forces during the war. The Best Years of Our Lives provides a sort of capstone to the story.

Telling the story of returning veterans was Samuel Goldwyn’s idea; he commissioned MacKinlay Kantor to write a screenplay. Instead Kantor turned in a treatment in blank verse.

(Excerpt) Read more at powerlineblog.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: movies; russell; tcm; wyler

1 posted on 05/26/2014 9:34:41 AM PDT by DFG
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: DFG

Best war movie.


2 posted on 05/26/2014 9:38:46 AM PDT by AceMineral (Some people are slaves of their own stupidity.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AceMineral

Best Movie.


3 posted on 05/26/2014 9:39:54 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: DFG

Have a box of tissues ready for the scene where Wilma helps Homer get ready for bed (dealing with his artificial arm).

That is one of the best and most sincere tear jerking scenes in movie history.

There are women today who are doing similar duties for the men they love who have returned from war. Love conquers all.


4 posted on 05/26/2014 9:48:15 AM PDT by randita
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DFG
Truly a great film. Harold Russell and Dana Andrews are well remembered in this film, Russell for his acting debut and brutal honestly about the lost of his hands, and Andrews for the very dramatic reliving of his character's wartime experiences.

But, I like Fredric March's subtle acting as the bank loan officer returning to a "normal" job after seeing much bloody action as an infantry sergeant. Anyone who gets a chance should rent "The Iceman Cometh" to see an aged March play Harry Hope, the owner of the bar in which the entire play takes place. He's just great as is Lee Marvin (no kidding) as the protagonist, Hickey.

5 posted on 05/26/2014 9:48:48 AM PDT by Dr. Thorne ("How long, O Lord, holy and true?" - Rev. 6:10)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: onedoug

ping


6 posted on 05/26/2014 9:50:04 AM PDT by windcliff
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DFG

I like Myrna Loy, so would have seen it for that reason if no other. But yes, it is a classic.
Rush Limbaugh remarked on his show that this movie “and others like it” influenced him when he was young and he thought that women were as depicted in a lot of these films( supportive and nurturing, I think he means). Then he grew up and found that women weren’t like that. Of course that was before he married his current wife. But Ive often thought about that, how our expectations are often shaped by movies, books, etc.


7 posted on 05/26/2014 9:52:20 AM PDT by crazycatlady
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DFG

It certainly rehabilitated Dana Andrews in my view. After his performance in ‘In Harms Way’ I wanted to take him out back beat the $hit out of him.


8 posted on 05/26/2014 9:52:57 AM PDT by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DFG

I’ve seen it several times and I will watch it again and again every time it is shown. It is a timeless message of the afterwar.


9 posted on 05/26/2014 9:55:24 AM PDT by ex-snook (God forgives and forgets.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: randita
There are women today who are doing similar duties for the men they love who have returned from war. Love conquers all.

I'm glad you mentioned the wives and girlfriends who are sticking with their men even though they returned from the wars with grievous injuries. I saw a quadruple amputee on the PBS Memorial Day program who is engaged to marry his sweetheart. I only hope these unions endure despite tremendous obstacles.

10 posted on 05/26/2014 9:58:57 AM PDT by luvbach1 (We are finished. It will just take a while before everyone realizes it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: crazycatlady
Rush Limbaugh remarked on his show that this movie “and others like it” influenced him when he was young and he thought that women were as depicted in a lot of these films( supportive and nurturing, I think he means).

They were like that; and then they were polluted by feminism.

11 posted on 05/26/2014 10:09:09 AM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: AceMineral

It’s a good flick, but notice how much booze those people guzzled!


12 posted on 05/26/2014 10:20:18 AM PDT by Savage Beast (Hubris and denial overwhelm Western Civilization. Nemesis and tragedy always follow.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: DFG

“If I only had hands!” said by Russell as he tried to grab a guy who said WWII was for nothing. One Helluva movie.

His adjustment and upbeat approach to his loss wasn’t phony. He got an Academy Award for it and later became head of the VA. He actually lost his hands as an EOD guy in the army (knew a couple of ‘em - a special breed of people, IMO).

Dana Andrews’ nightmare of a bomber in flames reminded me of when I worked in Missouri in the mid-50s. One of the women came in late and apologized “Jim had another bad night”. It was her kid, who served on the boats that fired those barrages of rockets before each landing. His job was to go in afterwards and remove the “duds” from the spigots.
Sometimes they weren’t duds, and fried the guy trying to remove them - or at least burned off his face and arms in the process.


13 posted on 05/26/2014 10:34:53 AM PDT by Oatka (This is America. Assimilate or evaporate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DFG

I’m fond of any movie which features B17s,as does this one.


14 posted on 05/26/2014 10:39:14 AM PDT by William Tell
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Savage Beast

There’s a lot of drinking in the Myrna Loy Thin Man movies too.


15 posted on 05/26/2014 10:51:50 AM PDT by crazycatlady
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Savage Beast
but notice how much booze those people guzzled!

Yup. Back in the day of the "three-martini lunch" when you could have a minibar in your office and everybody thought it was cool.

Back when we were a free, civilized country, in other words.

16 posted on 05/26/2014 10:59:19 AM PDT by JennysCool (My hypocrisy goes only so far)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: William Tell

Twelve O’Clock High starring Gregory Peck is on TCM tonight.


17 posted on 05/26/2014 11:16:39 AM PDT by DFG ("Dumb, Dependent, and Democrat is no way to go through life" - Louie Gohmert (R-TX))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: DFG
That's a great movie. Always loved this scene...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcwWCKU6ZT0

18 posted on 05/26/2014 11:29:33 AM PDT by Textide
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: DFG

My favorite movie of all time by my favorite director of all time, William Wyler. As a veteran who experienced lengthy deployments, I identify in some ways with the returning servicemen.

A couple of observations: For a few days after coming home each time, I had difficulty falling asleep...because it was *too* quiet! After serving for months on end with men, the one thing I really enjoyed was the smell of a woman wearing nice perfume.

We really do live in a great country. I would give my life for it, even today.


19 posted on 05/26/2014 11:31:59 AM PDT by twister881
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DFG

Thanks. I couldn’t resist buying the DVD several years ago. I’ll record the broadcast since accessing movies is easier on the DVR.


20 posted on 05/26/2014 11:35:24 AM PDT by William Tell
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: DFG
TCM has a great lineup of movies scheduled today.
I marked a few of them for recording.

Not meaning to hijack this thread, but I managed to buy a stand alone full feature DVD recorder before they became totally unavailable, and transferring the Dish recordings to DVDs is an ability I really appreciate.

I wonder if more modern versions of those recorders will ever again become available in the U.S.? I understand that they are available in Canada and Mexico...

21 posted on 05/26/2014 12:17:05 PM PDT by publius911 ( Politicians come and go... but the (union) bureaucracy lives and grows forever.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DFG

One of my top-five favorite movies.

I have the DVD; can watch it anytime.

I watch it often.


22 posted on 05/26/2014 12:25:52 PM PDT by Peter W. Kessler
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: crazycatlady
There’s a lot of drinking in the Myrna Loy Thin Man movies too.

...and what's even worse, smoking!!

Miss [Florence] King on smoking: "It's this: I think suicide qua suicide is weak and shameful, but maybe, if I just keep smoking, I can hasten my exit from this Walpurgisnacht called America and escape the mephitic cultural collapse that Nice-Nelly conservatism is powerless to stop.

"This is probably wishful thinking in view of my family's medical history, but it points up another benefit of cigarettes we no longer hear about: consolation. Even the word is gone from the language now, but it was what came through in World War II newsreels showing weary soldiers and refugees lighting up. In their most despairing moments a cigarette was all they had, and increasingly I feel the same way.

"There goes my chance at Keynote 2000, even if I work on my perkiness and arrange to rent a baby."

I often worry whether they censor/edit these old classic war movies.

23 posted on 05/26/2014 12:27:33 PM PDT by publius911 ( Politicians come and go... but the (union) bureaucracy lives and grows forever.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: crazycatlady
There’s a lot of drinking in the Myrna Loy Thin Man movies too.

The Thin Man was written by Dashiell Hammett, yet another key literary figure who was a communist drunkard with ties to financial elites, whose works are well-known and well-respected. Hammett, as is common for such men, served in both WWI and WWII. I like The Thin Man series, personally, it reminds me of the '90s, i.e., a replay of the '20s. A time of success and invariable accompanying excess and overreach.

Hammett founded his writing career on his experiences during a few short years as a young Pinkerton detective.

Hammett notably birthed the career of the younger Lillian Hellman. In Hammett's readings, he came across the real-life story of two lesbian schoolteachers, and presented the idea to Hellman and helped her write The Children's Hour, which was made into a Hollywood film. Though they never married, Hellman came to be Hammett's final supporter as her career waxed and Hammett's waned.

Thus we see the consistent, slow steady promotion of both socialism/communism and immorality.
24 posted on 05/26/2014 12:34:00 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: DFG

watching now


25 posted on 05/26/2014 1:29:29 PM PDT by yldstrk ( My heroes have always been cowboys)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: crazycatlady
Yes. I noticed the drinking in the Thin Man movies too. They get up in the middle of the night. Myrna says: "Fix me a drink." They have a cocktail.

This was shortly after the repeal of Prohibition, when it was thought sophisticated to guzzle alcohol.

There was another flick--Alice Faye, I think--in which the girls of the chorus smoked cigarettes. I'm sure the people of that time considered it terribly sophisticated.

Today it's considered sophisticated to be mindlessly decadent and nationally self-destructive--in other words, "liberal". Of course there's nothing sophisticated, intelligent, or liberal about these people or their brainless paradigms, but you'll never convince them of it.

There are stupid people everywhere and in every generation. They don't know they're stupid.

26 posted on 05/26/2014 1:56:05 PM PDT by Savage Beast (Hubris and denial overwhelm Western Civilization. Nemesis and tragedy always follow.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: publius911

I love Florence King. The more politically incorrect she is, the better I like her.

I understand the importance of consolation. That’s why I like tea, the beverage that “soothes, but does not inebriate.”
But I occasionally like beverages that inebriate, too.


27 posted on 05/26/2014 4:53:28 PM PDT by crazycatlady
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Thorne

Don’t forget the Beautiful Virginia Mayo, and The talented Hoagy Carmicheal.


28 posted on 05/27/2014 4:42:59 AM PDT by ABN 505
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson