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Cannabis really can trigger paranoia
The Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday 16 July 2014 | Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman

Posted on 07/16/2014 4:44:01 AM PDT by AustralianConservative

*The largest ever study of the effects of the main psychoactive component of cannabis suggests that it can cause paranoia in vulnerable individuals*

To discover whether cannabis really does cause paranoia in vulnerable individuals, we carried out the largest ever study of the effects of THC (∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the drug’s principal psychoactive ingredient). We recruited 121 volunteers, all of whom had taken cannabis at least once before, and all of whom reported having experienced paranoid thoughts in the previous month (which is typical of half the population). None had been diagnosed with a mental illness. The volunteers were randomly chosen to receive an intravenous 1.5mg dose of either THC (the equivalent of a strong joint) or a placebo (saline). To track the effects of these substances, we used the most extensive form of assessment yet deployed to test paranoia, including a virtual-reality scenario, a real-life social situation, self-administered questionnaires, and expert interviewer assessments.

The results were clear: THC caused paranoid thoughts. Half of those given THC experienced paranoia, compared with 30% of the placebo group: that is, one in five had an increase in paranoia that was directly attributable to the THC. (Interestingly, the placebo produced extraordinary effects in certain individuals. They were convinced they were stoned, and acted accordingly. Because at the time we didn’t know who had been given the drug, we assumed they were high too.)

THC also produced other unsettling psychological effects, such as anxiety, worry, lowered mood, and negative thoughts about the self. Short-term memory was impaired. And the THC sparked a range of what psychologists call “anomalous experiences”: sounds seemed louder than usual and colours brighter; thoughts appeared to echo in the individuals’ minds; and time seemed to be distorted.

(Excerpt) Read more at theguardian.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: alcohol; cannabis; causation; correlation; crime; marijuana; mentalhealth; nicotine; paranoia; pot; statistics; thc; tobacco; wod
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http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/jul/16/cannabis-paranoia-psychoactive-thc-mood
1 posted on 07/16/2014 4:44:01 AM PDT by AustralianConservative
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To: AustralianConservative

I’m suddenly reminded of the movie “Reefer Madness”


2 posted on 07/16/2014 4:47:51 AM PDT by Artie (We are surrounded by MORONS)
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To: AustralianConservative
WHO SAID SO....


3 posted on 07/16/2014 4:50:44 AM PDT by Paul46360 (..)
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To: AustralianConservative
(Interestingly, the placebo produced extraordinary effects in certain individuals. They were convinced they were stoned, and acted accordingly. Because at the time we didn’t know who had been given the drug, we assumed they were high too.)

That is very interesting. The value of double blind studies is to eliminate bias by preventing everyone involved from knowing which is the study group and which is the control. I would have thought that in a study of a psychoactive drug, it would be immediately apparent which group had received the placebo.

This is yet more evidence that marijuana is not as harmless as its legalization advocates have claimed. More such evidence will continue to accumulate as marijuana is legalized in more jurisdictions.

4 posted on 07/16/2014 4:52:08 AM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: AustralianConservative

Paranoia - just one of those myths created to scare young folk straight so they will give up pot.

Won’t work. The kids were ALREADY a little nuts when they took up the smoking of rope. Maybe it’s genetic, maybe it’s environmental, but it takes a certain twist of personality to commence and continue the use of such an odd chemical combination, that has the capability to interact with the critical thinking centers of the mind, and not in a favorable way.

Many of these youth would have been paranoid even without the pot as a contributing factor.


5 posted on 07/16/2014 4:52:17 AM PDT by alloysteel (Selective and willful ignorance spells doom, to both victim and perpetrator - mostly the perp.)
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To: Artie

When I first saw it, I thought it was over-the-top hyperbolic. Now, I’m not so sure. In view of current knowledge, it only seems slightly exaggerated.


6 posted on 07/16/2014 4:53:10 AM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: AustralianConservative

I can absolutely testify to that being true. I smoked truck loads of reefer when I was a teen, and sometimes I would become so paranoid I’d just hide in the house!


7 posted on 07/16/2014 4:53:52 AM PDT by weezel
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To: Artie

Me too. (-;


8 posted on 07/16/2014 4:54:07 AM PDT by AustralianConservative
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To: All

but duuuuuuuudddde... it’s pure mother nature man, 100% safe and stuff man... inhaling this doctored, unfiltered weed is safer that anything else man.. you’re just a hater man.. it’ll cure everything man, it’s like, you know, perfect stuff man. it’s non addictive man, and just because I can’t live without it doesn’t mean I’m addicted man..

wait, wha...


9 posted on 07/16/2014 4:54:24 AM PDT by newnhdad (Our new motto: USA, it was fun while it lasted.)
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To: weezel

Ouch.


10 posted on 07/16/2014 4:55:25 AM PDT by AustralianConservative
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To: AustralianConservative

I haven’t been this stunned since the revelation about the dog who bit the man.


11 posted on 07/16/2014 4:55:38 AM PDT by McBuff
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To: newnhdad

As my Psych professor told my class, “It may be natural, but so is Cyanide.”


12 posted on 07/16/2014 4:57:37 AM PDT by Politicalkiddo (The more helpless the victim, the more hideous the assault.)
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To: newnhdad

It’s just an herb man, if God did not want us to use it he would not have put it in the earth.


13 posted on 07/16/2014 5:00:33 AM PDT by Patriot365
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To: Patriot365

Go eat some toadstools.


14 posted on 07/16/2014 5:01:37 AM PDT by Monty22002
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To: AustralianConservative

Anyone wondering how the Nanny State has managed to take over our lives might do well to consider the consequences of three or four generations of paranoid people.


15 posted on 07/16/2014 5:05:27 AM PDT by JennysCool (My hypocrisy goes only so far)
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To: AustralianConservative

Ping to review paranoid responses.


16 posted on 07/16/2014 5:11:10 AM PDT by DannyTN (I)
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To: AustralianConservative

17 posted on 07/16/2014 5:14:26 AM PDT by CodeJockey
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To: AustralianConservative

Quit thinking about me.


18 posted on 07/16/2014 5:17:01 AM PDT by AppyPappy
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To: Patriot365

So we should drink Hemlock?


19 posted on 07/16/2014 5:17:50 AM PDT by AppyPappy
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To: AustralianConservative
NSA? Just because you are paranoid doesn't mean that someone isn't watching you. LOL
20 posted on 07/16/2014 5:20:49 AM PDT by 2001convSVT (Going Galt as fast as I can.)
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To: AustralianConservative
Cannabis really can trigger paranoia

So those guys at the NSA who want to snoop on everything are high on pot? It would explain a lot....

21 posted on 07/16/2014 5:22:37 AM PDT by PlasticMan
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To: AustralianConservative

Duhhh!


22 posted on 07/16/2014 5:28:39 AM PDT by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: AustralianConservative

As a FORMER smoker I could have told them this for a lot less money- it is 100% true but it is a side-effect of over-use. Like too much alcohol, there are consequences from prolonged over-exposure.

Everythingn in moderation. Occasional use does not do this.

It’s been 20 years since I did that but I remember it vividly- it was the main reason I quit, before I ‘woke up’ from the after-effects and realized what it was.


23 posted on 07/16/2014 5:41:20 AM PDT by Mr. K (Palin/Cruz 2016)
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To: AustralianConservative

Ping


24 posted on 07/16/2014 5:43:19 AM PDT by Victor (If an expert says it can't be done, get another expert." -David Ben-Gurion, the first Prime Minister)
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To: alloysteel

I found nothing pleasurable in weed in my youth. I would not call it paranoia-no one was coming to take me away. But there was no “Feelin’ Groovy” about it.

It caused me to withdraw into myself, if that makes sense.

I was at a neighbor’s house about 8 years ago and someone passed around a joint. What the hell, I thought. Maybe the quality has changed. Nope. Same thing. I spent the rest of the evening worrying about going home, even though I lived right across the street. A strange worry which made no sense. I could walk. I could talk. I knew where home was. No one was going to meet me at the door with a “What have you been doing?”

Anecdotal & no paranoia but I would not be to quick to discount it as a myth. I have heard others say the same thing.


25 posted on 07/16/2014 5:43:30 AM PDT by Protect the Bill of Rights
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To: AustralianConservative
Cannabis really can trigger paranoia

With 0bama's goons running amok and the NSA tracking your every word, the potheads in Colorado and Washington must be going nuts.

26 posted on 07/16/2014 5:49:01 AM PDT by The Sons of Liberty (I want 0bama to make history - First to be IMPEACHED and REMOVED!)
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To: AustralianConservative

This is EXACTLY what has me so worried about legalization!


27 posted on 07/16/2014 5:49:10 AM PDT by Happy_Regicide
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To: Artie

Except I worked with a guy, a committed liberal, who confessed to heavy marijuana use in his younger years. I asked him why he stopped. He replied “I was getting too paranoid.” Strictly anecdotal, but there it is.


28 posted on 07/16/2014 5:54:49 AM PDT by driftless2 (For long term happiness, learn how to play the accordion.)
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To: Monty22002

“It’s just an herb man, if God did not want us to use it he would not have put it in the earth.” (Sarc!)


29 posted on 07/16/2014 6:18:57 AM PDT by Patriot365
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To: Patriot365

Heheh, that’s better. I’ve seen too many say that without sarcasm.


30 posted on 07/16/2014 6:20:33 AM PDT by Monty22002
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To: AustralianConservative

Sounds like we need to make that placebo illegal too.


31 posted on 07/16/2014 6:32:25 AM PDT by Wolfie
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To: exDemMom
(Interestingly, the placebo produced extraordinary effects in certain individuals. They were convinced they were stoned, and acted accordingly. Because at the time we didn’t know who had been given the drug, we assumed they were high too.)

That is very interesting. The value of double blind studies is to eliminate bias by preventing everyone involved from knowing which is the study group and which is the control. I would have thought that in a study of a psychoactive drug, it would be immediately apparent which group had received the placebo.

This is yet more evidence that marijuana is not as harmless as its legalization advocates have claimed.

ROTFL! Seriously?! Real marijuana is harmful because fake marijuana makes some people think they're stoned?!?

32 posted on 07/16/2014 7:08:38 AM PDT by ConservingFreedom (A goverrnment strong enough to impose your standards is strong enough to ban them.)
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To: AustralianConservative
it can cause paranoia in vulnerable individuals

So if you find you're a vulnerable individual, don't smoke it. Peanuts can cause serious and even fatal allergic reactions in vulnerable individuals - should we ban them?

33 posted on 07/16/2014 7:11:46 AM PDT by ConservingFreedom (A goverrnment strong enough to impose your standards is strong enough to ban them.)
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To: ConservingFreedom
So if you find you're a vulnerable individual, don't smoke it. Peanuts can cause serious and even fatal allergic reactions in vulnerable individuals - should we ban them?

You realize that you're going to have to fight off the inevitable 'benefits' that these people will be seeking when they're unable (unwilling) to work in about 15 years...

34 posted on 07/16/2014 7:38:54 AM PDT by IncPen (None of this would be happening if John Boehner were alive...)
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To: IncPen
You realize that you're going to have to fight off the inevitable 'benefits' that these people will be seeking when they're unable (unwilling) to work in about 15 years...

Not "inevitable" - and conservatives should be fighting those programs regardless.

35 posted on 07/16/2014 7:46:28 AM PDT by ConservingFreedom (A goverrnment strong enough to impose your standards is strong enough to ban them.)
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To: IncPen
You realize that you're going to have to fight off the inevitable 'benefits' that these people will be seeking when they're unable (unwilling) to work in about 15 years...

The "inevitable benefits?" I've been smoking and self-medicating with marijuana for 40 years. So have many of my friends and acquaintances. None of us receive government benefits because we have and continue to smoke pot. The only "direct benefits" that I receive from the government are the whooping tax bills that the government gives to me a reward for being an entrepreneur and producer of jobs and benefits for my several businesses and many wonderful employees.

36 posted on 07/16/2014 7:53:49 AM PDT by Labyrinthos
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To: ConservingFreedom
ROTFL! Seriously?! Real marijuana is harmful because fake marijuana makes some people think they're stoned?!?

No. The result of this study was that significantly more people in the test group had paranoid thoughts than the people in the control group (whether they experienced the placebo effect or not).

This was a short term study. Long term studies are showing deleterious effects of marijuana use, even 2 years after the last use. Furthermore, marijuana has been shown to precipitate psychotic disorders in non-mature brains; this short term study supports this finding. The brain finishes developing at about 25 years.

37 posted on 07/16/2014 5:07:48 PM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: exDemMom

I think we should outlaw MJ. Put people in prison for possession and spend billions a year trying to stop the trafficking and use. It has worked so well this far. Maybe we should double the effort and show how serious we are.


38 posted on 07/16/2014 5:10:01 PM PDT by morphing libertarian (Advanced technological development.)
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To: morphing libertarian

Robbing banks is illegal, yet people still rob banks. So maybe we should just give up and make bank robbery legal.

You can’t use as a serious argument that crime is not stopped by making it illegal. The price of making it legal (in the name of saving money on cops, trials, prisons, etc.) is to greatly increase the activity, and increasing the amount of money society must spend to deal with the consequences.

My sense is that as the brain-damaging effects of marijuana become more documented and widely-known, this experiment with making it legal will end. I am beginning to think that Reefer Madness was not as over-the-top sensationalist as I thought when I first saw it, that it may actually be based on real observations of marijuana users.


39 posted on 07/16/2014 6:40:27 PM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: exDemMom

Thax four anticipating my argument.

I’m with you let’s put them all in jail.

I see the analogy between using MJ and robbing a bank. Let’s increase our taxes and give these potheads the war on drugs they fear the most.


40 posted on 07/16/2014 6:42:05 PM PDT by morphing libertarian (Advanced technological development.)
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To: exDemMom
Pot laws have dramatically loosened all across the US in the last 20 years, yet crime has plunged and highway death rates are at record lows.

CA, for example, defacto legalized when they voted for medical mj in 1996. Violent crime has fallen by half in CA since then.

http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/cacrime.htm

http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/uscrime.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_motor_vehicle_deaths_in_U.S._by_year

41 posted on 07/16/2014 10:24:12 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: Ken H

So... we should be keeping people with criminal minds stoned all the time, because pot has the well-known effect of inhibiting initiative?

What I see in the graph is not a correlation between pot legalization and crime, but a clear relationship between the lax attitudes on crime that began in the 1960s and the more strict measures that started being implemented in the 1990s when people were concerned over high crime rates.

You have to be careful when looking for a causative relationship between correlated observations. Unless a causative mechanism can be established, you might be looking at things that aren’t even connected to each other.


42 posted on 07/17/2014 4:12:08 AM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: exDemMom
(Interestingly, the placebo produced extraordinary effects in certain individuals. They were convinced they were stoned, and acted accordingly. Because at the time we didn’t know who had been given the drug, we assumed they were high too.)

That is very interesting. The value of double blind studies is to eliminate bias by preventing everyone involved from knowing which is the study group and which is the control. I would have thought that in a study of a psychoactive drug, it would be immediately apparent which group had received the placebo.

This is yet more evidence that marijuana is not as harmless as its legalization advocates have claimed.

ROTFL! Seriously?! Real marijuana is harmful because fake marijuana makes some people think they're stoned?!?

No.

OK. Thanks for the clarification - I thought your second paragraph was meant to relate to your first.

Marijuana, like alcohol, is certainly not harmless; product harms should be made known to adult consumers, who in a free society should then be left to choose for themselves.

43 posted on 07/17/2014 6:18:00 AM PDT by ConservingFreedom (A goverrnment strong enough to impose your standards is strong enough to ban them.)
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To: exDemMom
Robbing banks is illegal, yet people still rob banks.

Bank robberies are detected 100% of the time, potential victims take all manner of preventive measures beforehand, and actual victims cooperate in investigations afterward. The vast majority of illegal drug transactions go undetected, and those involved actively seek out those transactions and strive to avoid investigation. Laws against consensual acts are, by the nature of the act, doomed to futilty.

44 posted on 07/17/2014 6:42:06 AM PDT by ConservingFreedom (A goverrnment strong enough to impose your standards is strong enough to ban them.)
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To: exDemMom
What I see in the graph is not a correlation between pot legalization and crime,...

There is indeed a correlation between the two. Crime has plunged while pot laws have loosened. There are now 23 states and DC with medical mj laws. It does not necessarily mean there is causality, but there is definitely a strong correlation.

...but a clear relationship between the lax attitudes on crime that began in the 1960s and the more strict measures that started being implemented in the 1990s when people were concerned over high crime rates.

The strict attitudes on crime, especially drug crimes, began in the early 1980s. It wasn't until the 1990s that drug laws began to loosen. The correlation is weaker. Other correlations are present as well, including strengthening of gun rights and widespread use of the internet. I suspect those have contributed, as well.

The bottom line is that the drug warriors who screamed about rampant crime have been proven wrong. Loose marijuana laws have not led to an increase in crime.

45 posted on 07/17/2014 8:02:37 AM PDT by Ken H
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To: exDemMom
I am beginning to think that Reefer Madness was not as over-the-top sensationalist as I thought when I first saw it, that it may actually be based on real observations of marijuana users.

That's like thinking that Plan Nine From Outer Space is based on real observations of space aliens.

46 posted on 07/17/2014 10:24:44 AM PDT by PlasticMan
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To: weezel
I have seen people become very paranoid from getting high.
47 posted on 07/17/2014 10:27:28 AM PDT by KSCITYBOY
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To: AustralianConservative
Cannabis really can trigger paranoia

The word, or the substance?

48 posted on 07/17/2014 10:34:11 AM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: ConservingFreedom
Bank robberies are detected 100% of the time, potential victims take all manner of preventive measures beforehand, and actual victims cooperate in investigations afterward. The vast majority of illegal drug transactions go undetected, and those involved actively seek out those transactions and strive to avoid investigation. Laws against consensual acts are, by the nature of the act, doomed to futilty.

What happens when drug addicts become so addled that they can no longer hold down a job? Some of them turn to various forms of crime to feed their addiction; others become homeless bums and beg to feed their addictions. If these people had families that loved them, they cause untold pain to those families who must watch them descend into living hell. Some drug addicts turn violent and physically harm or even kill others. Drug abuse is hardly a victimless crime. It may not be as overt as a bank robbery, but the damage it causes is far more pervasive and causes more long-term collateral damage.

I have an uncle who has been in prison since the 1970s for a horrific murder he committed while under the influence of illicit drugs. You cannot convince me that drug abuse is a victimless crime, or that it should be legalized.

49 posted on 07/17/2014 5:19:29 PM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: Ken H

Once again, you are attributing a causative effect to a correlation where no causative mechanism exists.

The drug laws were strict since the early 1900s, and crime was low until the permissive attitudes of the 1960s became widespread. In the 1960s, prison sentences were reduced because very vocal activists started blaming everyone but the criminal for crimes committed, and pushed strongly for lenient sentencing and alternatives to prison, like attendance at group therapy. This is also the time when crime started to explode. In the 1990s, as a result of widespread criminal behavior, people started pushing back against the anti-prison activists. They voted for 3 strikes laws and minimum prison sentences for crimes were enacted.

I should also point out that in the 1960s, one could go to prison in CA for possession of marijuana. That changed sometime in the late 1960s/early 1970s, so that by the end of the 1970s, possession of less than a gram of marijuana was a misdemeanor, not a felony. If more lenient marijuana laws can really cause a drop in criminal behavior, then why did crime rates keep going up after marijuana laws were “liberalized” in the 1970s?

To attribute the drop in crime to legalization of marijuana is to completely ignore the proactive anti-crime laws that were enacted at the time.


50 posted on 07/17/2014 5:35:06 PM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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