Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Old technology in NSA age: Typewriter sales surge in Germany
RT.com ^ | July 23, 2014 | Unknown

Posted on 07/23/2014 7:09:30 PM PDT by Enterprise

Earlier in July, German politicians said they were considering going back to old-fashioned manual typewriters for confidential documents, in order to protect national secrets from American NSA spooks.

Patrick Sensburg, chair of the German parliament’s inquiry into alleged NSA spying, said committee members are considering new security measures and are seriously thinking about abandoning email and returning to old school typewriters.

(Excerpt) Read more at rt.com ...


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Germany; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: nsa; security; stasi; surveillance; typewriters
Love those old typewriters.
1 posted on 07/23/2014 7:09:30 PM PDT by Enterprise
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

The return of typewriter ribbons and carbon paper?


2 posted on 07/23/2014 7:12:42 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty - Honor - Country! What else needs said?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

I’ve been thinking of looking for my manual Royal Typewriter. Built in 1927 and weight a quarter ton. I hid it somewhere, maybe to weigh the house down. If this trend continues, you may find young people studying Greg’s Shorthand along with entering typing contests.


3 posted on 07/23/2014 7:12:44 PM PDT by lee martell
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SandRat

And WHITE OUT! Woo Hoo!


4 posted on 07/23/2014 7:14:47 PM PDT by Enterprise ("Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Guess they never heard of Tempest.


5 posted on 07/23/2014 7:14:47 PM PDT by mylife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

I bet the NSA owns those IBM Selectrics...

I actually have one.

Still works.


6 posted on 07/23/2014 7:15:07 PM PDT by glasseye
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Lol....


7 posted on 07/23/2014 7:16:31 PM PDT by Dallas59
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Had an old Remington that I loved and it would be much more secure than these monitored electronic gadgets.


8 posted on 07/23/2014 7:17:33 PM PDT by txrefugee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SandRat
I think i saw a forensics show way back when, where they reconstructed letters typed via the ribbon. It was genius back in it's time. No time stamp on the ribbon but i loved it, caught! Oh wait, maybe it was a Columbo episode :)
9 posted on 07/23/2014 7:21:07 PM PDT by GizzyGirl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: mylife

A security expert might advise them of the hazards of using electric typewriters regarding tempest. Not to worry though if they are going to be using the old non electric typewriters. Maybe a few jobs for clerk typists will come back.


10 posted on 07/23/2014 7:22:26 PM PDT by Enterprise ("Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: glasseye

They made a top secret version of the selectric to prevent spies from intercepting what was typed on them by measuring the change in voltage on the power line while typing,


11 posted on 07/23/2014 7:22:35 PM PDT by ThomasThomas (What is the differnce in spontinaity and ADD?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Just don’t connect the computer to then Internet and it can’t spy on you...


12 posted on 07/23/2014 7:23:42 PM PDT by DB
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

True enough.


13 posted on 07/23/2014 7:23:47 PM PDT by mylife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: txrefugee

I have good memories of using the old ones. Kind of like someone who likes old cars.


14 posted on 07/23/2014 7:25:59 PM PDT by Enterprise ("Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: GizzyGirl

Same story used a couple of times on “Ben Mattlock.”


15 posted on 07/23/2014 7:28:21 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty - Honor - Country! What else needs said?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

The Germans are right on this.

Let the NSA try to snarf up typed documents through secure carriers.

Some things you can’t just effortlessly skim and store in Utah.


16 posted on 07/23/2014 7:32:13 PM PDT by SpaceBar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Add TYPEWRITER to the list of NSA spying/search history red flag words along with PRESSURE COOKER, and BACKPACK. Something to hide.

Going back to a typewriter must be an experience since there’s nothing to put a squiggly red line under spelling errors, and no backspace key to facilitate in correcting errors.


17 posted on 07/23/2014 7:33:06 PM PDT by Antihero101607
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise; Charles Henrickson; mikrofon

ICH BIN EIN TYPELINER

18 posted on 07/23/2014 7:36:40 PM PDT by martin_fierro (Computers were too ... mainstream)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Antihero101607

Actually there IS a backspace key but it doesn’t correct an error. You had to erase the typo and type it over.


19 posted on 07/23/2014 7:37:14 PM PDT by RipSawyer (OPM is the religion of the sheeple.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Antihero101607

Later model Selectrics were available in self-correcting.


20 posted on 07/23/2014 7:37:38 PM PDT by 2111USMC (Aim Small Miss Small)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Antihero101607

Typewriters can be hacked and monitored.


21 posted on 07/23/2014 7:39:01 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Antihero101607

It’s a real chore typing a lengthy document, without making grammatical errors, mistakes or misspellings, and without leaving something out. And if something important is left out, you may have to type the whole thing over again.


22 posted on 07/23/2014 7:42:04 PM PDT by Enterprise ("Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Have my manual Smith-Corona I bought with graduation money in 1977. Doubt if a ribbon could be found for it, though. Are electric typewriters out of the question, or can they be compromised, too? We own a Brother one of those.


23 posted on 07/23/2014 7:42:22 PM PDT by madison10
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: madison10

You may be able to find a ribbon on line.


24 posted on 07/23/2014 7:44:11 PM PDT by Enterprise ("Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

How about just buying a computer with no internet connection?


25 posted on 07/23/2014 7:48:07 PM PDT by PGR88
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 1010RD

Yeah, let them hack my manual typewriter. THAT would be funny.


26 posted on 07/23/2014 7:50:35 PM PDT by madison10
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: lee martell

you may find young people studying Greg’s Shorthand along with entering typing contests.”

In one of my old scrapbooks my mom kept I found my typing award from 1955 - 70 wpm!!! I still find myself making notes in shorthand although, on occasion, I do have to stop and think about some of the characters for a minute. Hadn’t even heard anybody mention Gregg’s shorthand for many a year.


27 posted on 07/23/2014 7:53:13 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: madison10

Last month, I bought 3 ribbons for my 1962 curvey Hermes 3000.

$6


28 posted on 07/23/2014 7:54:14 PM PDT by gasport (President Omoeba needs to evolve a spine)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: RipSawyer

You had to erase the typo and type it over.”

I remember when the original White Out came out. Somebody always forgot to screw the lid back on tightly and then it dried and you had to add thinner. Or you put too much on the paper and then had to blow on it to get it to dry. Sometimes the correction cover - like paint - would pop off and you could see the incorrect letter below. Had to be careful erasing errors on onionskin or you had a hole in the paper. We were so delighted when those white out strips came along. No more liquid to mess with. Interesting times.


29 posted on 07/23/2014 7:59:39 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Who knew, ribbon readers would make a comeback.


30 posted on 07/23/2014 8:03:23 PM PDT by Steamburg (Other people's money is the only language a politician respects)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 1010RD
Typewriters can be hacked and monitored

Yeah right. Unless there's a 7-foot tall goon standing over you with his arms crossed.

31 posted on 07/23/2014 8:04:35 PM PDT by Extremely Extreme Extremist
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Grams A

Here’s a bit of trivia: who invented Liquid Paper?

A Monkee’s mother: Bette Nesmith Graham


32 posted on 07/23/2014 8:13:10 PM PDT by madison10
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

I still have my sleek, chic Olivetti portable from college in the mid-60s. It was considered a cutting edge Italian design back in those days.


33 posted on 07/23/2014 8:22:44 PM PDT by clintonh8r (It's possible to love your country and hate your government. I'm proof of it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: madison10

“A Monkee’s mother: Bette Nesmith Graham

And I still use it——white kitchen floor,little dings, apply White-Out,poof—————ding gone.

.


34 posted on 07/23/2014 8:24:00 PM PDT by Mears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Pretty neat article. I was thinking the other day how many “low tech” devices that have fallen out of use could find a role today.

Now, I admit I was thinking in terms of various “bug out”/SHTF scenarios at the time, so I was thinking more along the lines of carrier wave radios and mechanical computers. :) But the typewriter seems to be a very good example of an old tool finding new life in a real world situation.


35 posted on 07/23/2014 8:28:59 PM PDT by DemforBush (Whoever double-crosses me and leaves me alive, he understands nothing about Tuco.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: madison10

I didn’t know that. Leave it up to a woman to invent it though. Don’t remember ever seeing a guy do any typing back then.

I do remember during the early 1980’s one of the secretaries in our office was going to be out for several weeks so the regional personnel office got a really great temp to fill in. Typed 120 wpm without error, super organized, had all kinds of awards from the secretarial school, etc. Only one problem it was a guy. My boss had a fit and fired him. Said “only a guy who was gay would even want to be a secretary”. Pretty funny looking back, particularly since many of us thought my boss was a closet gay.


36 posted on 07/23/2014 8:31:59 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: DemforBush

Hint.
HF shortwave is very difficult to DF.


37 posted on 07/23/2014 8:34:08 PM PDT by mylife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Grams A

70wpm is quite good. Enough for a good job at that time. I have never gotten faster than 26 to 30 wpm mistake free. If typewriters become big again, I expect newer models will be a little quieter and more sensitive to touch. I still need a way to erase besides empting a bottle of white out every other day.


38 posted on 07/23/2014 8:57:12 PM PDT by lee martell
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

Well, there is a up side to all of this!

When the next crater is in a US city, our politicians, intell and law enforcement will have their excuse in pocket, blame Snowden.

Of course a failure to secure our Southern Border, deport those who over stayed Visas (which actually includes the terrorists of 9-11 but isn’t mentioned often), our managing of this threat as if it is a mere law enforcement function, our political correct approach that doesn’t focus on the actual demographic from where the threat emanates, our immigration policies that are allowing in hundreds of thousands that have a value system that is entirely incompatible with liberal Western society and our Constitution, not can they actually be vetted, THOSE MINOR DETAILS our politicians, intell folks and law enforcement won’t touch once the next hole in in a city somewhere!

You know, there was a time before we had a terrorist problem, and back then we didn’t have massive surveillance systems that fly in the face of the US Constitution, a 9 billion per year TSA that has caught zero terrorists...


39 posted on 07/23/2014 9:17:56 PM PDT by Red6
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Extremely Extreme Extremist

Leave the goon at home.

http://www.qccglobal.com/news/first-keystroke-logger.php


40 posted on 07/23/2014 9:24:27 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise

HA, I predicted this. The written word survived for at least 4,000 years on rock, skins, parchment, cloth, glass, and paper. One EMP could wipe out every word typed into computers.


41 posted on 07/23/2014 9:38:44 PM PDT by WVNan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: lee martell

70wpm is quite good. Enough for a good job at that time.”

It did lead to a good job. Went to work for TWA at $244 a month. Seems to me like I had more money then than I do now. Two huge bonuses came with the job. First, lots of young, single good looking guys worked there and second had a chance to fly non-rev. It was space available and I didn’t have any seniority so couldn’t bump anyone but it was free and got to see a lot of the U.S.

My first boss wouldn’t allow any corrections on letters and he dictated and I typed a lot of them every day. Established good work habits from the onset which have always helped along the way but also made me a very picky boss! It’s just a mindset which unfortunately isn’t present any more.


42 posted on 07/23/2014 10:15:43 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise
Um, if you disconnect a Puter from the net it can spellcheck and also PRINT.. Just so you Germans understand that..
43 posted on 07/23/2014 10:19:21 PM PDT by MaxMax (Pay Attention and you'll be pissed off too! FIRE BOEHNER, NOW!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise
going back to old-fashioned manual typewriters

I very much approve. Low tech is the best!

44 posted on 07/23/2014 10:48:54 PM PDT by Age of Reason
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Grams A

I don’t know why I decided to take typing in high school but I did for two years and I have probably used what I learned in typing class more than anything else I learned in high school. Now it seems that everyone learns to use a keyboard but in the old days that was not the case.


45 posted on 07/24/2014 5:09:46 AM PDT by RipSawyer (OPM is the religion of the sheeple.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: RipSawyer

Now it seems that everyone learns to use a keyboard but in the old days that was not the case.”

I think one of the differences was that we did all our classwork and tests using a paper and pen/pencil and wrote in cursive. Now everyone does everything on a computer and cursive is becoming a lost art.

Found that you can tell whether someone learned on a typing keyboard or on a computer keyboard by watching which keys they use when typing numbers. We old typewriter users still tend to use that top row of numbers. Newbies use the number pad on the right hand side of the keyboard.


46 posted on 07/24/2014 8:58:10 AM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Grams A

I learned on a manual typewriter over fifty years ago but I use the pad on the right almost exclusively for numbers, probably because I used to use an old adding machine with that number keyboard and am used to it. I used to be very fast with the adding machine but I am much slower now on the computer.


47 posted on 07/24/2014 9:03:29 AM PDT by RipSawyer (OPM is the religion of the sheeple.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: RipSawyer

I too use a ten key adding machine by touch and frequently throughout the day because of the type of work that I do. The way I do it works for me without slowing me down and I see no reason to change. Have enough other irrelevant stuff to learn just to be able to get to what is really relevant so I can complete a task.

At least someone had the wisdom to accommodate people like me by leaving the number keys on the top row where IMO is the only place they belong.


48 posted on 07/24/2014 9:27:34 AM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Enterprise
US Embassy, Germany....


49 posted on 07/24/2014 9:34:25 AM PDT by Jane Long ("And when thou saidst, Seek ye my face; my heart said unto thee, Thy face, LORD, will I seek")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson