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A New Discovery in Roman Britain
Popular Archaeology ^ | May 10, 2017 | Popular Archaeology

Posted on 05/10/2017 5:28:26 PM PDT by LouieFisk

More of the ancient Roman city of Verulamium’s secrets have been discovered by archaeologists. The burnt remains of a 1,800-year-old kiln - a type of oven used to create pottery - have been unearthed during excavations of the ancient city near the modern city of St. Albans in Hertfordshire, Great Britain.

(Excerpt) Read more at popular-archaeology.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: archaeology; britain; discovery; godsgravesglyphs; hertfordshire; roman; romanempire; stalbans; unitedkingdom; verulamium
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Roman city of Verulamium.
1 posted on 05/10/2017 5:28:26 PM PDT by LouieFisk
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To: LouieFisk

What color is the boathouse at Hertfordshire?


2 posted on 05/10/2017 5:32:55 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (You cannot invade the mainland US. There'd be a rifle behind every blade of grass.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Hereford..?


3 posted on 05/10/2017 5:36:44 PM PDT by gaijin
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To: LouieFisk

Very cool.

(Just be careful with the subway dig at Hobb’s End)


4 posted on 05/10/2017 5:47:15 PM PDT by BenLurkin (The above is not a statement of fact. It is either satire or opinion. Or both.)
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To: LouieFisk

Thanks for the post.

I had not realized how extensive (if that’s the right word here) the Roman occupation had been in ancient times, in this region.

It’s interesting to read about those times, new finds and the like.


5 posted on 05/10/2017 5:48:37 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Happy days are here again!)
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To: BenLurkin

Don’t want them devils from Mars to get you.


6 posted on 05/10/2017 5:50:34 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (That's my story and I'm sticking to it!)
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To: DoughtyOne
"I had not realized how extensive (if that’s the right word here) the Roman occupation had been in ancient times, in this region."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
It's fascinating stuff.


7 posted on 05/10/2017 5:56:23 PM PDT by LouieFisk
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To: LouieFisk

Thanks. Quite impressive.


8 posted on 05/10/2017 6:00:56 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Happy days are here again!)
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To: LouieFisk
"kiln - a type of oven used to create pottery"

Phew! I'm sure glad they cleared that up.

9 posted on 05/10/2017 6:27:45 PM PDT by who_would_fardels_bear
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To: LouieFisk
Roman city of Verulamium.

Thanks for this information. It brings me back to the late 1940's, when I cycled out to that area. The City of St. Albans which is said to be where the Verulamium is, was named for the Christian Martyr- Alban. He refused Roman conversion to the gods and was executed.

The actual Verulamium is a outdoor theatre, still complete with a dais for musicians. The hypocaust in the area is a bath which could be heated. There were trenches beneath it, where hot charcoal was pushed. All available for tourists.

Notable for me is of the exploits of Boadicea (Bodicca). She was a Briton and chafed under Roman occupation. She roused her tribesmen and sacked three Roman cities including the Verulamium. On her eventual defeat, she is said to have taken poison to evade capture. A magnificent sculpture is at Westminster Bridge. This shows the warrior Queen in her chariot. Blades sticking out from the wheel hubs.

Excuse the history. It does bring me back to being a raw youth of 17 years in England.

10 posted on 05/10/2017 6:34:58 PM PDT by Peter Libra
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To: Peter Libra

“Excuse the history. It does bring me back to being a raw youth of 17 years in England.”
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Not to worry - I’m a fan of bits and pieces of history. I’m pretty familiar with Boadicea and the half dozen or so variants of the spelling of her name. It’s an interesting story, what the Roman did to her and her daughters and the ensuing battles. Her tribe had success at first with their guerrilla-like tactics, but they were no match for the Roman’s organization and training.


11 posted on 05/10/2017 6:41:59 PM PDT by LouieFisk
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To: Peter Libra

Never apologize for giving us a history lesson. I enjoyed reading your comments.


12 posted on 05/10/2017 6:51:04 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Vacate the chair! Ryan must go.)
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To: LouieFisk

My daughter and I stumbled upon the Cerro da Vila ruins in Vilamoura, Quarteira, Portugal several years ago. It was the first Roman ruin I’d been to outside Italy and I was surprised to see a Roman outpost so far from Italy. Your map explains it. It is a wonderful place to visit if you ever happen to be in the Algarve in Portugal.

Such a shame the Christendom lost North Africa.


13 posted on 05/10/2017 6:57:42 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Bigg Red; Peter Libra

Indeed. Lots of history buffs on FR (me included).


14 posted on 05/10/2017 6:59:57 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Me, too.


15 posted on 05/10/2017 7:06:11 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Vacate the chair! Ryan must go.)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Yeah, the Romans even made it China, but not as conquerors. Rome was all over the place. Pretty amazing how it left it’s mark just about everywhere.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Roman_relations


16 posted on 05/10/2017 7:11:51 PM PDT by LouieFisk
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To: Bigg Red

Notice in the map the Romans stopped when they got to Scotland. The Roman Emperor Hadrian got tired of having his troops in England constantly having to battle the Scots when they made incursions and had a wall built which was called Hadrian’s Wall and the remnants of which are still the dividing line between England and Scotland today. Walls work!


17 posted on 05/10/2017 7:40:06 PM PDT by kiltie65
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To: kiltie65

From that map though, it looks like they got a bit up into Scotland. A fair part of the South. There is Hadrian’s wall and my friends tell me, there is a 2nd wall as well. I’ve seen Hadrian’s, beautiful scenery around it.

The history of the Roman empire in what is now the UK is utterly fascinating. We were just discussing some other story on it a few months ago.


18 posted on 05/10/2017 9:24:23 PM PDT by BeadCounter (Trump; most pro-life president ever.)
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To: LouieFisk

Palmyra in Syria is absolutely beautiful; ruins of the Roman empire. Until the war came, we will see if any of it can be savaged.


19 posted on 05/10/2017 9:25:55 PM PDT by BeadCounter (Trump; most pro-life president ever.)
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To: LouieFisk

bmp


20 posted on 05/10/2017 11:01:18 PM PDT by gattaca ("Government's first duty is to protect the people, not run their lives." Ronald Reagan)
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