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To: Kaslin

Every electric company should have lots of spare parts. Buy now, save on higher prices in the future.

I’m not sure why lines are still strung up on poles when a bunch of it could be buried under ground? Especially in areas of high wind.


4 posted on 10/08/2017 11:27:57 AM PDT by PrairieLady2
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To: PrairieLady2

Because burying high voltage transmission and distribution line is very, very expensive compared to putting them up on poles.


7 posted on 10/08/2017 11:59:52 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: PrairieLady2

>>I’m not sure why lines are still strung up on poles when a bunch of it could be buried under ground? Especially in areas of high wind.

Because the customers don’t understand business or electricity. They want everything and want it now and think it should be free because “it’s a necessity”. Underground comes with flooding problems (the transformers are on the ground). Above ground comes with wind problems. Then there are the transmission voltages that make 100% underground impossible.

Undergrounding also becomes a problem when water, sewer, reuse, storm drains, cable, and telephone are also underground. This is why new subdivisions are easily undergrounded, but a retrofit is very costly.


8 posted on 10/08/2017 12:12:03 PM PDT by Bryanw92 (Asking a pro athlete for political advice is like asking a cavalry horse for tactical advice.)
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To: PrairieLady2
Every electric company should have lots of spare parts.

Tell that to their Public Utilities Commissions.

10 posted on 10/08/2017 12:14:51 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: PrairieLady2

Puerto Rico’s power company was $9 billion in debt before this year’s hurricanes, and is plagued with power outages just because the grid is old. The PR power company gives away power free to government and the politically connected.

How much are YOU willing to pay for an underground grid in PR? PR isn’t going to pay for it.


11 posted on 10/08/2017 12:20:16 PM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: PrairieLady2

>>I’m not sure why lines are still strung up on poles when a bunch of it could be buried under ground? Especially in areas of high wind.<<

Several reasons. Two of the bigger ones are (1) buried cables lose power, and (2) while a buried cable is less likely to go out in a storm, if it DOES go out (say because of flooding, rodent chewing, digging, etc), it can take ten times as long to find and fix the problem.

Here’s a presentation on the issues:

https://www.puc.nh.gov/2008IceStorm/ST&E%20Presentations/NEI%20Underground%20Presentation%2006-09-09.pdf


15 posted on 10/08/2017 12:39:37 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 (Big governent is attractive to those who think that THEY will be in control of it.)
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To: PrairieLady2

About 5 years ago, Austin, TX and surrounding areas decided it was wise to turn off people’s electricity during a bad freeze because they were afraid heaters would overload the system. They were supposed to do a round robin turning the power off a few minutes here and then there. Thing is they forgot to turn some people back on and some they did turn back on caused transformers to blow. They very quickly ran out of transformers.

As for food, our HEB grocery store (a chain in TX) always has bare shelves and is always short of basic staples. I’ve lived here forever and know to stick with staples on the grocery list because 1) it’s fruitless to hope for anything more exotic than black or green canned olives and 2) the budget won’t allow it. You learn to stock up when an item is on the shelf. The day Harvey hit, I went to the store to fill a basket with canned tomatoes, not because of Harvey but because that’s the first time they had any in two months. Same story with basic ol’ all purpose flour. People will beg for that second gallon of milk in your cart. I haven’t seen cauliflower or pork ‘n beans there for years. Shelf bread comes in frozen, not fresh which makes no sense as we have people who commute to work in Austin. Being so close to a major city, there is no reason for this. We live a bit of Venezuela and PR every day right here in the US.


45 posted on 10/09/2017 6:01:03 AM PDT by bgill (CDC site, "We don't know how people are infected with Ebola.")
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To: PrairieLady2

In the late 80s, severe ice storm in Springfield Mo. caused major power outages. Was contacted several months later for permission to put some of the lines underground.


64 posted on 10/10/2017 12:31:06 AM PDT by greeneyes
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To: PrairieLady2

Expensive to bury it in built-up areas.


67 posted on 10/10/2017 1:37:06 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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