Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

N. Ireland - IRA's lefty roots still showing
Irish Echo ^ | 7 September 2001 | Jack Holland

Posted on 09/07/2001 1:09:12 PM PDT by Norn Iron

IRA's lefty roots are still showing

 

Copyright 2001 Irish Echo Newspaper

    September 5 - 11
By Jack Holland


     In times of political revisionism it is always easy to find something to snigger at. Take, for example, Massachusetts Rep. William Delahunt's remark last week that if Sinn Fein is proven to be linked to revolutionaries "it could prove devastating" to its standing here in the U.S.
     Those reporters (like myself) who over the years have stood on usually rain-soaked Belfast pavements listening to the Provisionals representatives read solidarity greetings from every revolutionary group from the ANC to the Sandinistas can be forgiven for muttering some platitude such as, "My, how things have changed."
     There was a time, that is, when it was taken for granted that Sinn Fein was identified with revolutionary groups. Now, it is taken for granted that it is not -- at less in the U.S.
     The occasion for the congressman's warning was the arrest of three Irishmen -- said to be prominent republicans -- in Colombia two weeks ago, charged with training the Marxist guerrilla group FARC, which has been conducting a mostly rural campaign against the U.S.-backed regime and its right-wing paramilitary allies.
     Of course, even before they became politically respectable, in the U.S. the Provisionals have always had to tailor their message to suit their audience. They trimmed away the overtly left-wing rhetoric from The Irish People reports (taken and edited from the much more radical Republican News); they did not talk about their support (in the 1970s and '80s) for communist insurgents in Central and South America nor dwell on the generous handouts from Colonel Gaddafi which kept the "armed campaign" going for a decade longer than it might otherwise might have lasted. The face of the Provisionals in the U.S. was always that of traditional Irish-Catholic nationalism, Joe Cahill rather than the self-proclaimed revolutionary Brian Keenan, who still (when allowed) gives vent to some pre-peace process outpourings. In the U.S., that is, the mood the Provisionals wanted to conjure up was always like that of a Wolf Tones concert. "The International" was not sung.
     In Europe, it was a different matter. There, extreme nationalism was suspect and identified with reactionaries and Nazism. So the Provisionals flaunted their left-wing links and could condemn U.S. and British imperialism with equal ferocity. However, they now move in different circles, where merely to utter the words "revolution" and "revolutionary" would be enough to make their new backers choke on their smoked salmon.
     While some would see Sinn Fein's attempts to distance itself from the Colombian connection as proof that the Provisionals have become respectable, Unionists see the arrests as proof of the opposite. The fact that three Provisionals have been linked to FARC is to them yet one more piece of evidence that the IRA is still active and up to its old tricks. They are not alone is this. Former Irish Taoiseach John Bruton, writing in last week's Washington Post, accused Sinn Fein of continuing to support violence through its connections to the IRA. He dismissed with contempt Gerry Adams's claim that the IRA guns remain silent.
     Reporters who have been covering this propaganda war have compiled a list of eight murders in the last 18 months that have been blamed on the Provisionals. The Irish Times listed the IRA victims as Joseph Foran, Thomas Byrne, Ed McCoy, Nicky O'Hare, Ciaran Smyth, Bobby McGuigan, Christopher O'Kane, and Paul Daly. They were shot because, according to reports, they were drug dealers. The Irish Times did not mention Joe O'Connor, a member of the Real IRA, who the Provisionals shot dead last October, bringing the estimated total to nine. That is, roughly one murder every two months since the beginning of 2000. If true, it means that the Provisional IRA, supposedly on cease-fire, has killed more people than dissident republicans, who are not on cease-fire. (In fact, fortunately, neither the Real IRA nor the Continuity IRA have not succeeded in killing anybody since 1998, though not from want of trying.)
     The Provisional IRA has also in the last two years been engaged in a major arms-smuggling attempt in Florida, and just two months ago a major robbery in Belfast. It has also been accused of continuing to carry out "punishment" beatings and knee-cappings in working-class Catholic areas. A week ago, a leading member of the Republican movement in Belfast, Eddie Copeland, was charged with assault and attempted kidnapping of a suspected drug dealer. Skeptics then ask how it is that Sinn Fein spokesmen can proclaim, in the U.S. and elsewhere, that the IRA's guns are silent, and keep a straight face?
     It would be more accurate -- and more honest -- if republican spokesmen said that the IRA's guns are "comparatively silent." In Provo-talk, silence is relative, as are cease-fires. It all depends on how you define them. But even if it is true that the IRA has been involved in all of the above actions, the organization could still maintain that it has not broken its cease-fire. Robberies, punishment shootings, the murder of petty criminals, are not part of the armed campaign, in IRA-think. The armed campaign was aimed at the army, police, and the Northern Ireland state. That war is over, as far as one can judge. But the IRA retains its role as a sort of enforcer.
     Unfortunately, while this may meet the semantic needs of fastidious republican thinkers, it does not equate to the reality of the peace process, as perceived by the Irish and British governments, as well as the Unionists. They point out that the agreement entered into by Sinn Fein (and everybody else) entailed the embracing of nonviolent methods. Any organization linked to a paramilitary group that was still pursuing violence would automatically be disqualified from taking part in that process. The Ulster Democratic Party (linked to the UDA) was kicked out once, as was Sinn Fein. But since the signing of the Good Friday agreement and the entry of Sinn Fein members into government in Belfast, there has been what seems like a tremendous reluctance on the part of the British and Irish governments to confront Sinn Fein as they did before with IRA actions. Even the hated RUC has conspired to keep its mouth shut about IRA attacks, fobbing people off with "We are pursuing all leads" when asked about possible IRA links to killings.
     The aim of this conspiracy is, of course, to keep the peace process on track. It is one of the ironies of the situation that former deadly enemies are now working together to do so


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS:
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-61 next last

1 posted on 09/07/2001 1:09:12 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
Astounding honesty from the Echo.

It's a well-known fact that the PIRA, RIRA and CIRA are all Marxist and not Catholic organizations.

Too many stupid Irish Catholics in the US, who are in their daily lives God-fearing Catholics and enthusiastic supporters of the free market, insist on supporting Democrats at home and terrorists abroad. My relatives are among this benighted lot and it drives me crazy.

2 posted on 09/07/2001 1:21:36 PM PDT by wideawake
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
At the risk of sounding naive or ignorant, would somebody please explain to me (in simple terms) who the various players in N. Ireland are, their beliefs and affilations and what "side" they are on. I don't know who's Catholic and who's Protestant and what they're fighting about. What are Orangemen, the Specials, etc. What's it all about?
3 posted on 09/07/2001 1:50:53 PM PDT by garyhope
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wideawake
Anti-Irish Catholic remarks from you and the poster of this article are fallng on deaf ears...I notice neither one of you posted any articles about the Protestants throwing rocks and bottles at the Catholic Irish chidren trying to go to school this week. Takes a real courageous parasite to throw rocks, bottles and holler obscentities at 4 year olds. You bigots need to find a hole and crawl back in it.
4 posted on 09/07/2001 1:57:03 PM PDT by HEFFERNAN2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: wideawake
Even the hated RUC has conspired to keep its mouth shut about IRA attacks, fobbing people off with "We are pursuing all leads" when asked about possible IRA links to killings.

The police can only say what they are permitted to say. Policing is not devolved but is handled by London and Dublin civil servants with London playing the main role if agreement cannot be reached.

5 posted on 09/07/2001 2:12:01 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: HEFFERNAN2
I've not posted any anti-Catholic remarks and Ive contributed to the discussion on the Ardoyne fracas at Bomb blast outside Belfast school - Policeman hurt as explosive lands near Catholic schoolgirls

It seems your bigotted roots are showing!!

6 posted on 09/07/2001 2:20:42 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

Comment #7 Removed by Moderator

To: HEFFERNAN2
Takes a real courageous parasite to throw rocks, bottles and holler obscentities at 4 year olds.

As if the IRA factions have never used deadly violence against noncombatants? Omagh street bombing scene, 1998? Real IRA?

8 posted on 09/07/2001 2:23:28 PM PDT by truth_seeker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

Comment #9 Removed by Moderator

To: garyhope
Try BBC - The Search For Peace. It has quite a bit of general information of the type you are looking for. The search engine Goggle,com is also very useful.
10 posted on 09/07/2001 2:27:07 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Campion Moore Boru
Certainly. There are so many participants in the conflict that it would be impossible to say for sure which action lead to which. A lot of information isn't in the public domain so that also has had an impact.

I think 1966 was a turning point. There was a thaw in 'hostilities' during the mid-60s but the commemoration of the anniversary of the 1916 Easter rising and the reaction to it brought the thaw to a shuddering halt.

Also the thaw was seen as a threat to the two aspirations and people like Hume and Paisley took to the streets. Their street politics and the politics of the times elsewhere produced a lethal cocktail.

11 posted on 09/07/2001 2:35:43 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Campion Moore Boru
You're too late. Richard Haass is packing his bags. See N. Ireland - Bush to send envoy
12 posted on 09/07/2001 2:40:50 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

Comment #13 Removed by Moderator

Comment #14 Removed by Moderator

To: Campion Moore Boru
I thought all was fair in love and war!!!
15 posted on 09/07/2001 2:56:09 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Campion Moore Boru
I think we've had 4 Nobel Peace Prizes in the past 30 years!!
16 posted on 09/07/2001 2:57:53 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

Comment #17 Removed by Moderator

To: Campion Moore Boru
Maybe these quotes will help!!

Insanity in individuals is something rare - but in groups, parties, nations and epochs, it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he doesn't become a monster. Friedrich Nietzsche

18 posted on 09/07/2001 3:05:31 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Campion Moore Boru
Perhaps we haven't seen the last of Bill Clinton!!
19 posted on 09/07/2001 3:07:49 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

Comment #20 Removed by Moderator

To: Campion Moore Boru
I thought these quotes fitted us in NI to a T, especially the second one. They might also apply to the Palestinian/Israeli conflict too.
21 posted on 09/07/2001 3:19:34 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Campion Moore Boru
I fear I'm starting to agree with you too much.

Don't worry. The feeling will soon pass!!

22 posted on 09/07/2001 3:21:48 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
I'm part Irish, but would never send a penny to the IRA. Those Americans that do should be ashamed of themselves. If you're Catholic, and live in Ulster, and don't like it, move to the Irish Republic! Of all the complete wastes of time in the world, this has got to be the most tragedic and pointless. All of the people who have been killed or hurt, and the solution is so obvious. If the words of the immortal Sam Kinnison, "IF YOU WANT TO LIVE IN THE IRISH REPUBLIC, MOVE TO IT!"
23 posted on 09/07/2001 3:58:35 PM PDT by Malcolm
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Malcolm
If you're Catholic, and live in Ulster, and don't like it, move to the Irish Republic! Of all the complete wastes of time in the world, this has got to be the most tragedic and pointless. All of the people who have been killed or hurt, and the solution is so obvious. If the words of the immortal Sam Kinnison, "IF YOU WANT TO LIVE IN THE IRISH REPUBLIC, MOVE TO IT!"

Which would require abandoning one's ancestral homeland, in a country where folk still emphasize marrying within one's home county. May I ask why you don't say "If you want to live in the UK, move to Britain" to the unionists?

24 posted on 09/07/2001 7:24:31 PM PDT by Dumb_Ox
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: garyhope
It goes back to the seventeenth century when the English transplanted Protestants from Scotland to Ulster or what is considered present-day Northern Ireland (there are actually nine counties in Ulster, six in Northern Ireland). The Protestant English gave special favors to the Protestant landowners. Eventually Northern Ireland became about two thirds Protestant in population. The Protestant ascendancy was assured by their victory over Irish nationalists at the Battle Of The Boyne in 1691 with the support of William of Orange of the Netherlands. Ever since then and with the creation of the Orange Order, Ulster Protestants have been called Orangemen. Ireland became part of Britain around 1795. When Irish nationalists early in the twentieth century made progress in creating an independent Irish republic, Protestants in Ulster feared domination by what would be a mostly Catholic country. After the creation of the Irish Free State in 1921, Northern Ireland was created to give Protestants control over a country of their own. In the process, the Catholics (about one third of the population) in Northern Ireland were treated as second class citizens. The struggle for civil rights for Ulster Catholics in the 1960's gave way to reemergence of the IRA and the creation of the Provisional IRA (PIRA) which was much more violent and Marxist than the old IRA. The Protestants have their own para-military groups like the Ulster Defense Force (UVF) and a few others. Both Catholic and Protestant paramilitary groups have rogue elements who like killing and crime more than they like progress and peace. The PIRA remains ostensibly a Marxist organization opposed to both British control of Ulster and the resurgent capitalist Republic Of Ireland. The Protestants in Ulster still fear Catholic domination.
25 posted on 09/07/2001 7:32:57 PM PDT by driftless
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Malcolm
Sorry, but we are all entitled to live here [NI] and we have to agree to differ on those things we can't agree on.

We signed up to an Agreement that was relatively fair to the two competing aspirations but the Governments, sadly, paid more heed to the demands of the terrorists than the needs of the rest and the terrorists have been 'taking over' local communitities, Mafia-style.

26 posted on 09/08/2001 1:21:30 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: driftless
Your history of NI and the region prior to 1960 is way, way out!!

Ulster History is a simple introduction to the history of the region. It has been compiled by someone from the unionist side of the house but, as histories go, is reasonably fair.

27 posted on 09/08/2001 1:46:09 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
Lets sing the praises of the righteous Protestants who bombed schoolgirls the other day. Such noble, strong, brave men! (swoon,swoon). < /sarcasm>
28 posted on 09/08/2001 1:50:34 AM PDT by Bella_Bru
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: driftless
'The English' turns out to be a Scot, James I [VI of Scotland] who became the monarch of the Great Britain and Ireland after the death of Elizabeth. The old name for the Maiden City in his time was written Derrie - in the Scottish style. After being developed by the London guilds it became Londonderrie in the 1640s before changing to Londonderry/Derry.
29 posted on 09/08/2001 1:54:19 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Bella_Bru
Let's not. Thank goodness things are starting to settle down. That part of Belfast has had a very troubled 35 years and it will be very difficult for the local people to reach an accommodation.
30 posted on 09/08/2001 1:57:41 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
I don't think they will ever reach a lasting peace. And that's sad. Those children who were at that school learned a nasty lesson about fear and hate. It's a cycle that keeps perpetuating itself.
31 posted on 09/08/2001 2:01:21 AM PDT by Bella_Bru
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Bella_Bru
There was also the young boy who was chased by a car driver, run over and killed. It happened not far from Ardoyne and has added to the hate factor.
32 posted on 09/08/2001 2:31:41 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron

NEWSHOUND - bookmark this site for Northern Ireland News

33 posted on 09/08/2001 3:18:07 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
You're right, Norn Iron, the Agreement is the only way forward. Some of the people on this board seem to think that if Britain would just pull out, then all would be rosy in the garden. They seem to forget the small matter of almost one million people who want no part of a united Ireland. Are they just going to go quietly? The vast majority of Irish people just want whatever accomodation which will bring peace. Unification will not: it will just result in a reversal of paramilitary roles in relation to the state. Powersharing with involvement of the two governments is the only way. Republicans must accept that a united Ireland will not bring peace. Unionists must accept Irish involvement.
34 posted on 09/08/2001 7:23:20 AM PDT by Youngblood
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Youngblood
Logic would suggest that we should have joint sovereignty and shared expenses though Dublin might resent paying their share!!
35 posted on 09/08/2001 8:09:40 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
I'm way off? I doubt it. There have been different rulers of Britain like James of Scotland, but basically the English have been the masters of Ireland over the centuries. You can maybe cite where I'm wrong on particulars here and there, but those are the facts.
36 posted on 09/08/2001 4:22:12 PM PDT by driftless
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: driftless
James wasn't the ruler of Britain, he was the ruler of Great Britain and Ireland. I think if you look at the pedigrees of the monarchs you'll find that they were a fairly cosmopolitan breed.

It just so happens that the centre of power for the two islands has been in London for most of the past 800 years. Would the history of the Empire have been very different if it had been in Dublin, Edinburgh or Cardiff?

37 posted on 09/09/2001 2:28:20 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: driftless
Britain and Ireland were united in January 1801 under the Act of Union 1800.

UVF stands for Ulster Volunteer Force, the name adopted in the 1960s from the original force of the 1910s which had been set up to resist the imminent granting of home rule (which was held up by the outbreak of WW1).

The Battle of the Boyne occurred in 1690.

38 posted on 09/09/2001 3:21:43 AM PDT by Youngblood
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
"Logic would suggest that we should have joint sovereignty and shared expenses though Dublin might resent paying their share!!"

A nice jump in taxes would sort out the Republicans from the Unionists in the south!

39 posted on 09/09/2001 3:26:00 AM PDT by Youngblood
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Youngblood
N. Ireland - Behind the Smokescreen
40 posted on 09/09/2001 3:42:09 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
I basically don't know if we're arguing about trifles or inportant points. Do you agree that for the most part the power in London has favored the Protestants in Northern Ireland? Especially during the Protestant Ascendancy?
41 posted on 09/09/2001 11:37:38 AM PDT by driftless
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: driftless
'The Ascendency' refers to the Irish landlords who were mainly members of the Episcopalian Church of Ireland. Their power largely evaporated in the early 1900s with land reform, when tenant farmers became owners instead of leaseholders, and with the arrival of the two governments in Belfast (devolved) and Dublin (independent).

London basically lost interest in NI after devolution and left it to the local unionists, the major party, to run the show. Local nationalists largely opted out because they wanted a United Ireland. Until Direct Rule was introduced in 1972, and a few years before that, NI really only featured in London plans during WWII.

During the first 50 years of NI's existence the vast bulk of the power, privilege and discrimination lay with unionists and in the past 30 years nationalists have achieved a position where they now have more say than unionists, especially since the the Anglo-Irish Agreement in 1985.

The three major religious denominations in NI are roughly, Catholic 40%, Presbyterian 20% and Church of Ireland 15%. CoI have gone from being top dog so far as power was concerned in the late 1800s for the whole island to third place - or less - in NI now.

42 posted on 09/09/2001 2:38:38 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: driftless
I basically don't know if we're arguing about trifles or inportant points.Trifles for some may be important ideas for others. We can easily find that the meaning of words has changed through the centuries yet this is easily overlooked. There is a big difference between the position of Protestants in Ardoyne, Belfast, now and the Ascendency in the 1800s.
43 posted on 09/09/2001 2:45:04 PM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: HEFFERNAN2
First of all, moron, I'm an Irish Catholic.

Second of all, I did post against the despicable stoning of Catholic schoolgirls on threads which were pulled.

Third, I don't see you defending our Church all that often when it's being theologically and historically assailed by Protestant bigots on this forum. You spend far more time defending the cowardly IRA.

If you claim to be an Irish Catholic then you should be aware that:

(A) The IRA is a Marxist ideological group which has no claim on any Catholic's loyalty any more than the Communist Party of North Korea and

(B) That no Catholic worthy of the name would defend the actions of a secret society which blows up children of any denomination - since, in case you hadn't learned, the Church condemns both violence against innocents and membership in secret societies.

Get a life and stop embarassing the Church and the Irish.

44 posted on 09/10/2001 4:57:19 AM PDT by wideawake
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: wideawake
the Church condemns both violence against innocents and membership in secret societies.

On the latter point aren't there secretive aspects to Catholic organisations such as the Jesuits and Opus Dei?

45 posted on 09/10/2001 5:03:19 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
There are no secretive aspects to the Jesuits. They have a peculiar command structure - all Jesuit superiors report to the Superior General of the Society who reports directly to the Pope.

Historically this means that the Jesuits have often failed to notify local bishops of their undertakings and projects - leading to accusations of underhanded dealing and secrecy. In reality, this was more a function of a certain arrogance and lack of tact, not deceit or malice. After the Jesuits were reestablished in the 1800s the Society began to be more collegial and collaborative in their approach with the local hierarchy.

Opus Dei is a more complex phenomenon. The Church has historically placed the interactions of the confessor and the penitent under seal - the same principle as doctor/patient and lawyer/client privilege as I'm sure you are aware.

Opus Dei is peculiarly structured as well - it is composed of both laity and clergy and it is, similar to the Jesuits, directly responsible to the Pope and not to local bishops. Moreover, the relationship between the lay members and clerical members of Opus Dei is preeminently one of penitent to confessor.

Almost all the projects undertaken by Opus Dei are projects undertaken by laymen under the advice of their spiritual directors - the seal of the confessional applies. Members of Opus Dei do not take secret oaths like secular secret societies do, and do not publicly profess one set of beliefs and privately embrace another.

In the interests of full disclosure I should point out that while I am not and have never been a member of Opus Dei I have worked in several of their inner-city tutoring programs and received spiritual direction at the hands of their priests in the past. The discipline and approach of Opus Dei is not for me, which is why I am not a member, but I appreciate their sincerity and their dedication. When I worked with them I found members to be intensely private people who "kept their own counsel" but never found them to be secretive or deceitful.

I would not describe Opus Dei as a "secret society" anymore than I would apply the term to the AMA or the ABA.

46 posted on 09/10/2001 8:07:58 AM PDT by wideawake
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: truth_seeker
"As if the IRA factions have never used deadly violence against noncombatants? Omagh street bombing scene, 1998? Real IRA?"

"Deadly violence against noncombatants?" Ever heard of the firebombing of Dresden? Hiroshima? Or even how many Serb civilians Klinton's bombers killed?

Sinn Fein!

47 posted on 09/10/2001 8:20:05 AM PDT by glc1173@aol.com
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: wideawake
Any thoughts on why Clinton used USIA funds to promote a political development programme for Northern Ireland post-Agreement using Boston College?

Anyone who knows anything about the problems of NI would have used a neutral institution not a Jesuit university!!

48 posted on 09/10/2001 10:44:03 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Norn Iron
Boston College is so secularized that it is no longer recognizable as a Catholic, let alone a Jesuit, institution.

One of its professors is a practicing witch who promotes paganism and lesbianism on campus. The small number of actual Jesuits on the faculty are among the most leftist dissident clerics who draw a salary in the US.

I'm a devout Catholic who holds up the traditional Ignatian Jesuits as an educational ideal - but I would never let any child of mine near that school.

Clinton's choice of BC was stupid not because BC has any pro-Catholic bias (in fact it has a self-hating antiCatholic one) but because it has a clear association with Marxist-Leninist revolutionary theory and is a hotbed of the (papally-condemned) school of "liberation theology" espoused by renegade Communist priests.

The BCers would support any terrorist revolutionary organization regardless of their denominational affiliation.

49 posted on 09/10/2001 11:27:40 AM PDT by wideawake
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: wideawake
Interesting. And Georgetown?
50 posted on 09/10/2001 11:48:33 AM PDT by Norn Iron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-61 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson