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1 posted on 09/13/2001 5:07:25 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
That's nice. I just graduated from Embry-Riddle. [sigh]
2 posted on 09/13/2001 5:10:13 AM PDT by Coop
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Embry-Riddle considers itself a "victim" in the tragedy because it's likely one or more of the commercial pilots who died received training through the university, Ledewitz said. University officials were still checking their records to determine if any of the American or United airlines pilots had attended ERAU.

Prosecute those involved, close the school, level the buildings, turn the rest of the assets over to the victims, erect an American Holocaust museum on the site.

3 posted on 09/13/2001 5:14:52 AM PDT by TightSqueeze
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Pray for the instructor. I heard on TV he is a total mess right now.
6 posted on 09/13/2001 5:20:37 AM PDT by Huck
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
I am a pilot, but not an airline pilot.

I have several friends who are airline pilots. They have all told me that flying an airliner is easy.

One of them called me to ask how long my laptop battery lasted. I told him I plugged it into the cigarette lighter. He said, "There is no cigarette lighter in the cockpit of a 757." I asked,"You play with your computer while flying an airliner?" He said, "There isn't any thing else to do."

I have been told several times the only hard part of flying an airliner is landing it. On a small prop plane your rear end is at most 6 to 10 feet above the ground when the wheels touch down. In an airliner the pilots bottom is 60 to 90 feet in the air, depending on the airliner. I have been told that once you master the sight picture of the high landing height, flying an airliner is a piece of cake.

Another airliner pilot told me it was harder to fly a Piper Cub than it was a 737. The 737 has a slight delay in control response, but that is quickly mastered in minutes. He said a 737 is very stable. A Piper Cub bounces all over the sky. He said flying Cub is like trying to guide a cork on rough seas. The wind has far less effect on a heavy airliner.

I used to let my daugher fly my plane when she was 10 years old. I would be PIC in the right seat so it was legal. She had zero problems. My son soloed at 16. He could fly a plane solo before he could drive a car by himself. He wrecked my cars... He never wrecked my planes. Come to think of it, my Daughter wrecked several cars and never put a dent on the plane either.

Flying a plane is not all that hard.

9 posted on 09/13/2001 5:25:41 AM PDT by Common Tator
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Afghani airline pilot trained fanatics, newspaper claims
Sydney Morning Herald Thursday, September 13, 2001

=================================================

A former pilot with Afghanistan's national airliner has reportedly said he helped train 14 Islamic militants to fly civilian aircraft.

The London-based Asharq al-Awsat newspaper quotes the pilot, now in Afghanistan, as saying some of the trainees had European passports,. They left Afghanistan nearly one year ago after completing their training.

The newspaper didn't say if the trainees were among the hijackers who slammed commercial aircraft into the Pentagon in Washington and the World Trade Centre in New York on Tuesday.

The trainees were reportedly Pakistanis, Afghans and Arab nationals.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/0109/13/world2/world35.html

10 posted on 09/13/2001 5:26:27 AM PDT by Byron_the_Aussie
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bttt
17 posted on 09/16/2001 5:34:07 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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