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Emergency Preparedness (year's supply of food, 72 hour kit)
Various Sources ^ | 9/15/2001

Posted on 09/15/2001 6:22:38 PM PDT by Utah Girl

The LDS Church who believes strongly in self reliance. Spencer W. Kimball, one of the deceased presidents of this church said, "No true Latter-day Saint, while physically or emotionally able, will voluntarily shift the burden of his own or his family's well-being to someone else... Maintain a year's supply. The Lord has urged that his people save for the rainy days, prepare for the difficult times, and put away for emergencies, a year's supply or more of bare necessities so that when comes the flood, the earthquake, the famine, the hurricane, the storms of life, our families can be sustained through the dark days... I am not howling calamity, but I fear that a great majority of our young people, never having known calamity, depression, hunger, homelessness, joblessness, cannot conceive of such situations..."

I just wanted to share some things that my church and family has done to be prepared. This is a list of a year's supply of food storage that can be gathered in one year. It is very flexible. I have the basics in my home, along with some "luxuries" in my food storage and preparedness are. If a calamity strikes, I think I will be prepared and will also be able to share with others. If you have any questions, please let me know. I'm going to try to post once a month (or sooner if requested) on this preparedness topic.

The Relief Society in my ward (it is the women's organization of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) has a lesson once a month on the first Tuesday of each month. The first part of that meeting is Family Preparedness. We cover many topics such as food storage, financial preparation, disaster awareness, first aid, etc. The lady in charge gets information on storing food, how to read dates on cans, where to buy in bulk. Usually every month she will make arrangements so that we can buy something in bulk (beans, dry milk, dried potatoes, etc.) In November we will be canning salsa and jumbleberry jam at the local cannery. Anyway, here is the list.

And a couple of other suggestions that I have found helpful. Make sure to buy food that you and your family will eat. Rotate through the food, don't just buy it and store it. When I go to the grocery now, I'll buy a case of something (fancy fruit cocktail, ravioli, beets, sweetened condensed milk.) If you don't have the money monthly to follow this plan, just pick up an extra can of something. Try to do what you can within your financial resources. NOTES: Personally I don't recommend buying those dehydrated foods for your whole food storage. You'll need a heck of a lot of water, plus how will you know if you like them until you've tried them? And it is extremely expensive.

Food storage calculator

January

Provident Living Goal---review your retirement goals.  Are you putting enough aside to be able to support yourselves and to do the things you want to do when you retire?  Also change the batteries in your smoke alarms.

Storage Goal:
24 cans of meat or fish per person
1 gallon bleach per person
can opener
garbage bags
laundry detergent

72 hour kit:
Gather a change of clothing including underwear and shoes for each family member--include warm coats and boots,
or have them immediately accessible.
ax, shovel and bucket
utility knife
$20.00 cash
$5.00 in change for phone
********************

February

Provident Living Goal---plan and carry out a family meeting on home fires.
Include planning an escape route and practicing it.

Storage Goal:
100 pounds (total) pasta & flour per person
hand grain mill
thread, needles, buttons, and zippers

72 hour kit:
1 gallon water per person
scriptures (Bible)
personal documents--genealogical records, wills, passports, insurance, contracts, birth certificates, etc.
$25.00 cash

********************

March

Provident Living Goal---Learn a new skill or read a book pertaining to your career.

Storage Goal:
50 cans of soup, stew or chili per person
5 pounds of salt per person
20 pounds fat, oil or shortening per person
aluminum foil, plastic wrap, storage bags, etc.
At least 5 gallons water per person--recommended is 14 gallons / person for 2 weeks

72 hour kit:
1 pound dried fruit or trail mix per person (can use fruit leather)
1 package soda crackers per person (4 per box)
1 package graham crackers per person (4 per box)
2 liters tomato or orange juice per person (Note: these items will be rotated every 6 months-see Sept)
ALSO make a goal to always have the fuel tanks on ALL vehicles at least half full.
***************************

April

Provident Living Goal---If you normally do not grow a garden, plan to grow at least one vegetable this year.  if you already have a garden either 1)grow a vegetable you haven't tried before OR 2) try a new method or technique this year.

Storage Goal:
2 pounds yeast per person
2 pounds baking powder per person
1 pound soda per person
1 gal vinegar per person
10 cans evaporated milk per person
10 pounds peanut butter per person
spices, condiments and vanilla

72 hour kit:
4 granola bars per person
2 sticks beef jerky per person
1 package chewing gum per person
hard candies or lollipops--at least 12 per person (note these items will be rotated every 6 months--see Oct.)

********************

May

Provident Living Goal---Make a goal and plan to exercise regularly.

Storage Goal:
100 pounds variety of cereal grains-rice, oatmeal, cornmeal, etc. per person
24 rolls paper towels per person
24 packages flavored gelatin per person
garden seeds
At least one month prescription ahead for all doctor prescribed medication.

72 hour kit:
battery powered radio
battery powered light
batteries

********************

June

Provident Living Goal---Make a goal to have 6 months wages in savings for emergencies.  Write out a realistic plan to make it happen.

Storage Goal:
First aid kit--should include scissors, knife, thermometer, measuring cup, medicine dropper, hot water bottle, triangular bandages, soap, matches, razor blades, needles, safety pins, adhesive tape, elastic bandages, sanitary napkins (excellent compresses), paper bags, gauze bandages, bicarbonate of soda, Ipecac syrup (induces vomiting), ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, calamine lotion (insect bites and sunburn), rubbing alcohol, diarrhea remedy, antibiotic ointment, first aid instruction book, prescription medication, waterproof matches.

72 hour kit:
Container for holding kit.  Large garbage cans with wheels OR a back pack for each family member recommended.  Find a place in your home that is easily accessible for storing the kit.  You need to be able to grab it at a moment's notice to leave your home.  Note:  Your first aid kit is also part of the 72 hour kit.  Note: your 72 hour kit is also part of your general storage, but your general storage CANNOT be part of your 72 hour kit.  When you need it there may not be time to gather it together for transport.

********************

July

Provident Living Goal---Make a goal to eat healthier.  For example: less sweets, more fresh fruits and veggies, less meat, more fiber etc.

Storage Goal:
50 pounds sugar or honey per person
10--#10 cans (35 pounds total) powdered milk per person
2 toothbrushes per person
toothpaste
mouthwash
infant needs-formula, baby food, diapers, Tylenol etc.

72 hour kit:
Prepare blankets (the silver foil ones)
gather items to entertain your family and include in kit--UNO cards, coloring books and crayons, x-stitch kit etc.  Be
sure to include paper and pencils.
camp stove or portable BBQ and fuel
mosquito repellant
$25 cash

********************

August

Provident Living Goal---Learn to preserve food in a way you haven't tried before.

Storage Goal:
100 quarts fruit and or vegetables per person
24 pints jam or jelly per person
feminine needs
school supplies
pet supplies

72 hour kit:
1 can tuna per person
1 can pork and beans per person
1/2 pound dried milk per person
2 packets hot chocolate mix per person (or 1 large can per family).
2 instant soup packets per person (these should be rotated every year)
disposable plates, cups, bowls and flatware
pet supplies-be sure to include dishes, leash and extra water

********************

September

Provident Living Goal---Review your will if you have one.  Make any needed changes.  If you do not have a will, make arrangements to get one.  EVERY Adult should have a will.  Plan and carry out a FHE on the importance of preparedness.

Storage Goal:
10--#10 cans (35 pounds total) powdered milk per person
25 pounds canned or dried potatoes per person
50 quarts fruit or tomato juice per person

72 hour kit:
1 pound dried fruit or trail mix per person (can use fruit leather)
1 package soda crackers per person (4 per box)
1 package graham crackers per person (4 per box)
2 liters tomato or orange juice per person (Note: these items will be
rotated every 6 months-see March)
**********************************

October

Provident Living Goal---Make a goal to read 30 minutes/day to your children or grandchildren.  If you have not children to read to, make a goal to read at least 30 minutes/day just for pleasure.

Storage Goal:
50 cans soup, stew or chili per person
10 pounds cheese--dried or bottled per person
shaving supplies
dish soap

72 hour kit:
4 granola bars per person
2 sticks beef jerky per person
1 package chewing gum per person
hard candies or lollipops--at least 12 per person (note these items will be rotated every 6 months--see April)
Check batteries for light and radio.  Replace if needed.

********************

November

Provident Living Goal---Make a goal to reduce your family garbage by recycling more.

Storage Goal:
100 pounds wheat per person
1 #10 can juice mix with vitamin C per person
Hand/shower soap
light bulbs
At least one month prescription ahead for all doctor prescribed medication.

72 hour kit:
soap
toothbrushes and toothpaste
shaving supplies
infant needs
feminine needs
disinfectant
aluminum foil

********************

December

Provident Living Goal---Review your insurance coverage, life, household, vehicle.  Do you have enough?  Could you replace your vehicle or household foods with the coverage you have?

Storage Goal:
40 pounds dried beans per person
matches
candles
batteries

72 hour kit:
garbage bags
candles
matches
can opener

It's very important for us as human beings to be self-reliant.  Included in this folder is a program to assist you to get a years supply of emergency food, 72 hour kit, spiritual goals and provident living goals.
********************************

Water Needs

Water storage is by far the most important area of preparedness.

You can live for quite a long time without food, but only about 3 days without water.  The Fema (Federal Emergency Management Agency) recommends 14 gallons of water per person for a two week period.  That may seem like quite a lot, but it is only a gallon a day for drinking, cooking, and washing needs.  The agency recommends at least 14 day supply.

There are some hidden places in your home that have usable water.
One is the hot water heater.  Turn it off and open the drain at the bottom of the heater.  Make sure the gas is off, and the pilot light is out!  Another source is the toilet tank.  Not the bowl, the tank of water that goes into the bowl in a flush.  You can use that water as long as you don't use an automatic bowl cleaner in it. I would still add bleach to it, just to be on the safe side.

There are many ways to store water.
There are containers that you can buy especially for storing. These can be found in some super markets, and hardware stores.  Try on line if you can't find them in your area.  They come in different sizes.  The ones that I have seen are galloon, 15 gallon, and 55 gallon blue barrels.  The barrels work best with a pump, purchases separately, for about $10.  You can use heavy plastic juice containers, washed well with hot water and soap.  You can use liter pop bottles as well.  Do not use glass containers, bleach bottles, metal containers, milk bottles, or water already in milk bottle like containers.  These are made to decompose and will leak all over your storage room (personal experience!).

ALL water obtained from out of doors is subject to contamination for dirt, bacteria or other nasty things.  First it must be clarified and then cleaned of all physical impurities such as dirt and debris. Then it must be disinfected or made safe from biohazardous materials. No home method of water treatment can guarantee safety of the water. Certain water treatment methods described below can deduce the risks involved, but emergency treatment of water cannot guarantee safety of the water. Devices that are sold with a claim that they can purify any water should be avoided because they will not work as claimed.

Clarification

Settling:  This is the easiest method to remove most debris, including radioactive fallout from water.  To let water settle merely let it stand in a container, totally undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. This will allow any sediment to  sink to the bottom of the container. A handful of clay soil in each gallon of water will help speed this process. Since it takes so long to settle it is advisable to use a large container for this purpose, like a tough tote.  After settling is complete pour, dip or siphon the clean water to another container, being careful not to stir up the sludge at the bottom.  Discard the sludge and then purify water.

Hose Siphoning

Take a six or eight foot section of garden hose and stuff two cottontails in one end.  Place that end into a container of your dirty water. Then suck on the other end until water starts to come through.  Then place the that end into a container placed below the dirty water. Gravity will pull the water from the higher container into the lower container while trapping sediment in the cotton balls.  When the balls are clogged simply remove and replace.  This will clean about one quart per thirty minutes.  However, if the water is really muddy the cotton balls will have to be replaced very frequently.

Coffee Filters

Place three or four filters (one inside the other) into a mason jar and let the edges stick out over the mouth of the jar.  Then screw the lid on over the edge of the filters.  Pour the water into the filters.  The water will drip into the jar.  When the filters become clogged, replace them.  This type of filter will clean approximately one quart of very dirty water per two hours.

Purification

Boiling:  Water sterilization by boiling is preferred over any method of chemical disaffection because disease causing microorganisms cannot survive the heat of a sterilizing boil.  If water is cloudy, only heat sterilization can be fully relied upon to assure complete destruction of these organisms.  Bring the water to a rolling boil for *10 minutes, then adding one minute for each 1000 feet of elevation.

Chlorine:  Liquid household chlorine bleach can be used to purify water provided the label says that it contains hypochlotie as its ONLY active ingredient. Do NOT use granular or powdered forms of household bleach, they are poisonous!!  Add 2 drops of bleach per quart or 8 drops per gallon and let stand for 30 minutes.  If the water doesn't taste and smell of chlorine at that point, add another dose and let stand for 15 minutes.  If the water is cloudy you may double the dosage.
Liquid bleach loses strength over time.  In one years storage you must put in double the amount of bleach as new bleach.  Two year old bleach must not be used.  It is not potent enough to kill bacteria. After adding bleach to water, stir and let stand for 30 minutes. Bleach is totally ineffective against GIARDIA and other hardy forms of protozoa.  USE BOILING TO REMOVE THESE if they are suspected.

Iodine Tablets-- these are very effective against all forms of bacteria, however they are less effective against GIARDIA.  Iodine tablets usually have a relatively short shelf life, losing 20% effectiveness in just six months.  They are also sensitive to heat and light.  They turn color from gray to yellow as they become less potent.  The usual dose is one tablet per quart of clear water and two for cloudy.  Let stand for 30 minutes before use.

Regardless of the method of chemically disinfecting water, always double the dosage for cloudy water.  If the water temperature is cold, below 45 degrees, let it stand for one hour before using it.

Be sure to have some water on hand in case of any emergency. You will need it mostly for drinking, but also to wash up a bit and keep utensils clean.  Be sure to at least to have 1 gallon per person and a take week supply of actual clean water is recommended.  You can live for much longer without food than without water.

NOTE: Water is the hardest thing to store. I have 3 55 gallon containers of water, plus about 20 2 liter pop bottles of water. Not enough, but room is a concern. Just make sure to have enough bleach or iodine on hand to sterilize the water. Any time I get an empty soda bottle, I rinse it out, and fill it with water. I don't drink soda pop, but at family parties or work parties, I'll gather up the empty ones to use.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: 72hourpreps; beprepared; emergencyprep; emergencypreps; ldschurch; preparedness; rainyday
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To: Nita Nupress
And the Spam. What can I say... It was on sale.

LOL! It's all in the sauce you disguise it with. LOL!

/john

51 posted on 09/15/2001 7:24:26 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper
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To: seeker41
Yep, unused Y2K stuff will come in handy. But I'd strongly urge you to check out the foodstuffs in it and make sure they are current. Toilet paper on the other hand can be stored forever. ;-)
52 posted on 09/15/2001 7:24:48 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
Provident Living Goal---Make a goal to eat healthier. For example: less sweets...

Storage Goal: 50 pounds sugar or honey per person

This is all great information! July's suggestions gave me a chuckle, though.

53 posted on 09/15/2001 7:25:59 PM PDT by nepdap
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To: Nita Nupress
SPAM's not bad. I cube it, fry it up a bit and throw it in omelettes. Really pretty good :-).

You used to know me as M-A-H.

54 posted on 09/15/2001 7:26:42 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: kd5cts
One thing I read yesterday was to make sure we have enough cash on hand. ATMs might fail to work due to electricity outages, etc. I haven't seen any suggestions on the dollar amount, but I have some cash at home in twenties, tens, fives, and dollar bills, plus coins. I'm looking at my savings patterns right now and will beef up my savings. I just think this tragedy has been a wakeup call for me. Nothing happened on New Year's Day 2000, and I think I got a little complacent.
55 posted on 09/15/2001 7:27:20 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
Yep, unused Y2K stuff will come in handy. But I'd strongly urge you to check out the foodstuffs in it and make sure they are current. Toilet paper on the other hand can be stored forever. ;-)

GEEEEEEEEE we have used up our Y2K stuff I hate the thought of doing it all over again!

56 posted on 09/15/2001 7:28:02 PM PDT by RnMomof7
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To: MHGinTN
Thanks for all the pings! I truly appreciate it.
57 posted on 09/15/2001 7:28:23 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
"I don't have any idea what would constitute having enough guns and ammunition around." If you know how many guns and how much ammo you have then, you don't have enough.
58 posted on 09/15/2001 7:28:42 PM PDT by blam
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To: Utah Girl
You can use a large garbage bag, suitably modified, and a hole in the ground to collect drinkable water. I will try to post some links later. Yes, it requires energy. Solar is best in a true survival situation. That's why we have rolls of black plastic sheeting, and duct tape in our "required" pile. Shelter, water, and lots of other things.

/john

59 posted on 09/15/2001 7:28:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper
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To: Nita Nupress
Yeah, Dog Gone already confessed to me he's still overloaded with way too much low-grade T.P. Now, I don't know about you, but I can scrimp and get by with other low-grade stuff EXCEPT for cheap (i.e. scratchy!) T.P.
60 posted on 09/15/2001 7:29:16 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: Utah Girl
Thank you for your tips..When I did the Y2K thing I filled and froze pop bottles (soda for the uninformed:>)If you lose your power those pop bottles will turn your freeze into a cooler for food storage for a few days..
61 posted on 09/15/2001 7:30:23 PM PDT by RnMomof7
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To: RnMomof7
Before I started my own food storage, I looked at it as this big pile of food I had to collect and store. It was totally overwhelming. But I just started picking up stuff every time I went to the grocery story. After 15 years of this, I've really learned to use the stuff that I buy and rotate through it. It has become a habit. I know I did a big push in 1999 to be ready for 2000, so I know what you mean though. Now that I have the basics, it's nice to be able to buy a case of that fancy fruit cocktail that has mango and guava in it. I'll look at Costco too see what delicacies they have. Like chocolate (Nutella in the jar is a great item to have around.)
62 posted on 09/15/2001 7:31:48 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
Coffee filters are something good to have on hand, they're cheap and can be used for anything from coffee to gasoline, water and etc.
63 posted on 09/15/2001 7:32:28 PM PDT by blam
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To: RnMomof7
What a great idea to freeze pop bottles. I do have some extra room in my freezer, I think I'll do that on Monday.
64 posted on 09/15/2001 7:32:47 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: blam
I do have about a 5 year supply of coffee filters on hand. I use them for everything, even though I don't drink coffee. Thanks for the suggestion!
65 posted on 09/15/2001 7:33:33 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
It would require a heat source to get the water boiling. A stove, hot-plate, or just torching a pile of leaves in the back yard would do.

Lonesome

66 posted on 09/15/2001 7:35:25 PM PDT by Lonesome
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To: kd5cts
Duct tape and black sheeting. I'm picking some up on Monday, I'll put it on my list. The solar idea is fantastic. I also have a couple of Dutch ovens and charcoal to cook with, as well as an outdoor barbeque grill with propane. However, we can't store much propane here, but it is a good idea to have a bit around.
67 posted on 09/15/2001 7:35:33 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
Here's a suggestion for guns and ammo ... I'm sure others will add to this.

A good 12 ga pump shotgun, with #2 or # 4 shot shells (50 count, can be good hunting weapon as well as personal defense) and at least a dozen slug shells, is first. Additionally, one should have at least one revolver, six-shot, .38 or higher caliber and no less than 50 rounds of ammo (300 is more like it though); alternately, a good condition 1911A .45 semi-auto and hydra shok ammo is good ... nothing like a flying saucer winging toward a perp! It never hurts to have on .22 rifle (in expensive and good for small people and small game) around. Learning how to shoot, clean and store these weapons is a must FOR EVERYONE in the household! Guns can be used to kill, but that should be YOUR discretion, not a perps.

68 posted on 09/15/2001 7:37:08 PM PDT by MHGinTN
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To: RnMomof7, NotJustAnotherPrettyFace,kd5cts,Nita Nupress, Dog Gone, ALL
The most successful canning lesson we had was the one for chocolate storage. All the women in the ward went crazy ordering chocolate chips, semi-sweet chocolate chips, cocoa powder, etc. Chocolate is an essential item in food storage. ;-)

My mom bought a case of chocolate chips several years ago when my youngest brother was in high school. She opened the case and made a batch of cookies and rotated through it like she should have. Only when she went to get them the fourth time, all the bags were empty. My brother was eating them as snacks, but very carefully blowing up the empty bags and taping them shut and putting them back in the box. He did end up contributing a case of chocolate chips to food storage that year.

69 posted on 09/15/2001 7:39:38 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Nita Nupress/Geezerette
I'll assure you, I did learn a lot of things not to buy during the y2k thing. I ran out of most stuff but still have about two month's worth of coffee left. Also, I still have all the stuff required to grow (seed, fertlizer, pesticides)all my own food and all the equipment to process and store it. PS....The dogs ate all the spam, canned beef and etc. I ate all the tuna.
70 posted on 09/15/2001 7:39:49 PM PDT by blam
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To: Utah Girl
Thanks so much for this list....it is very informative, and I have bookmarked it for further study...
71 posted on 09/15/2001 7:40:51 PM PDT by andysandmikesmom
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To: MHGinTN
Wow, thanks for the info. A friend of mine almost has me talked into buying a gun. He wants someone to go to target practice with.
72 posted on 09/15/2001 7:40:59 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: MHGinTN, Utah Girl, RJayneJ
Wow, great post! Thanks for the flag, MHGinTN! And, Utah Girl, terrific work! RJayneJ, please note! :)
73 posted on 09/15/2001 7:42:58 PM PDT by summer
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To: NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
"M.A.H."

Thanks. I was about to mail you if I couldn't remember after a few minutes! Nice seeing you around again!

74 posted on 09/15/2001 7:43:49 PM PDT by Nita Nupress
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To: blam
The dogs ate all the spam,

Good riddance!

75 posted on 09/15/2001 7:50:38 PM PDT by Nita Nupress
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To: Utah Girl
Great post, Utah Girl. I think all Americans would be well-served to think about how to best plan for the immediate future. I know your post has opened my eyes.

Do you have any estimated costs of what the total monthly investment is to fund these purchases for General Storage and 72hr kit that you would be willing to share with us?

We should all think of it as self-insurance, instead of paying premiums we invest in a safety net of commodities and foods. Saved for a short winter storm that we hope never appears but we must prepared for...

Please add me to your 'ping' list for future useful posts such as this one. FReegards,

76 posted on 09/15/2001 7:51:06 PM PDT by RobFromGa
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To: MHGinTN
no less than 50 rounds of ammo (300 is more like it though);

For one trip to the range maybe.

Ammo is like everything else. If you buy a box of 50 for $14.95 at the range, you can probably get 500 for $80 mail order off of the internet. Buy in bulk. It lasts better than TP.

/john

77 posted on 09/15/2001 7:59:04 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper
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To: JMJ333
Oregon is mighty nice this time of year....
78 posted on 09/15/2001 8:00:27 PM PDT by gcruse
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To: Utah Girl
As far as money supplies go, it won't do any good if the dollar is worthless. Bible prophesy speaks of a time when they will throw money in the streets because it is worthless. I would suggest any money be in silver or gold currencies, which will be of some value while the paper will be worthless possibly. Of course it could be used as TP if you haven't stocked enough:)
79 posted on 09/15/2001 8:01:02 PM PDT by Epona
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To: RobFromGa
Do you have any estimated costs of what the total monthly investment is to fund these purchases for General Storage

If you do as UG suggests, you actually wind up spending less for groceries. If tuna is on sale, and you eat it, buy extra. You are cost averaging. When you have your larder complete, you find yourself only buying the stuff that's on sale. From personal experience, I save 20% over what I would have paid if I had bought everything at premium price.

/john

80 posted on 09/15/2001 8:04:15 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper
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To: Utah Girl
Thank you for bringing back all the Y2K prep ideas that many of our FReepers exchanged in 1998 and 1999!

I got my year's supply of Perma-Pak from Utah, and have it in a cool dry place! I don't regret investing the $$, and have a good feeling knowing it's there!

Love those Mormons!!

g

81 posted on 09/15/2001 8:06:25 PM PDT by Geezerette
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To: blam, Nita Nupress
Hi, blam and Nita!

Thanks for the flag!!

Seems like the good ole days, doesn't it?! I will bookmark this thread.

g

82 posted on 09/15/2001 8:10:59 PM PDT by Geezerette
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To: Nita Nupress, Blam
Join the SPAM Club Today!!!

The Monty Python Spam Sketch

83 posted on 09/15/2001 8:12:08 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: Geezerette
Nice to see you again!

At Jim Rob's request when they loaded up new software here a while back, I changed my screen name.

84 posted on 09/15/2001 8:14:55 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: MHGinTN
Thanks for the info, Marvin.

Bump!

85 posted on 09/15/2001 8:22:11 PM PDT by Victoria Delsoul
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To: MHGinTN
ping ... me
86 posted on 09/15/2001 8:27:25 PM PDT by gjenkins
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To: blam
I was lurking here and read most all the Y2K prepardness threads. Preparations were simple and easy but most all items are gone now.
87 posted on 09/15/2001 8:30:02 PM PDT by Inge_CAV
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To: RobFromGa
Do you have any estimated costs of what the total monthly investment is to fund these purchases for General Storage and 72hr kit that you would be willing to share with us?

We should all think of it as self-insurance, instead of paying premiums we invest in a safety net of commodities and foods. Saved for a short winter storm that we hope never appears but we must prepared for...

I don't have any idea what a monthly list like this would cost. It totally depends upon the number of people in your family, and their ages (children eat less than teenagers, adults eat less than teenage boys.) And if you rotate through the food storage, you kind of save money by buying in bulk and when it is on sale. I know that a local grocery store here has a canned goods sale every July. So I save a couple of hundred dollars for July and buy a lot of canned goods. Then when I use a can of something, I just buy one can to replace it as I go along.

In the future I'm going to post some ideas on what to buy, how to store it, and some recipes. I have a friend who is rich and a gourment cook. You should see her food storage. ;-)

Personally what I would recommend is to perhaps get your 72 hour kit together first. A lot of the stuff is lying around the house, I didn't buy hardly anything new. I did buy a solar, battery operated radio from Radio Shack for ten dollars. Here is the total list in one spot. I probably spent under 25 dollars for my kit, but I am single without children. The most money was buying the stuff for the first aid kit. One extra thing I threw in the first aid kit is four sanitray napkins. They work really well for compressing against a bleeding wound that needs to be staunched. I also store my sleeping bag and blanket right next to the 72 hour kit. I still use the sleeping bag when I go camping, so I didn't buy another one.

This 72 hour kit should meet the needs of your family. Use ready to eat foods your family will eat and hobbies and entertainment your family likes to do. Include individual medication as required by your family members. Whatever container is used should be portable.


You should have:

  • Immediately available
    • Battery powered radio
    • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Emergency Needs
    • Instruction Manuals on Emergency Preparedness
    • Water storage
    • Sleeping bags and blankets
  • Sanitation Kit
    • Plastic bucket with tight fitted lid
    • Plastic bags and ties
    • toilet paper
    • disinfectant
    • improvised toilet seat (for bucket)
    • feminine hygiene needs
    • paper towels
    • soap
    • paper cups
    • paper plates
    • plastic utensils
    • can opener
    • utility knife
  • Stress Factors
    • Children - coloring book, crayons
    • Adults - books, needle work
  • In the Car
    • Standard First Aid Kit
    • Blanket
    • Flashlight and batteries
    • Reflectors and flares
  • Individual Medical Needs
  • Suggested Additions
    • Family Photographs
    • Medical Information Sheet
    • Insurance Information
    • Identification for each Family Member
    • Will or Trust Information (copies of each)
  • Food - Ready-to-eat
    • Meats: canned
    • Fruit Cocktail
    • Peanut Butter
    • Powdered Milk
    • Infant Care: Canned milk and bottles
    • Dried Fruit: (caution - drink plenty of water.)
    • Raisins, prunes, fruit leather
    • Crackers
  • Stress Foods
    • Sugar Cookies
    • Sweetened Cereals
    • Hard Candy
  • Standard First Aid Kit
    • First Aid manual
    • Spirits of ammonia
    • Scissors
    • Table salt
    • Baking soda
    • Eye drops
    • Safety pins
    • Matches
    • Adhesive or paper tape
    • Bandages
      • Telfa pads (4"x4")
      • Triangle Bandage (37"x37"x37")
      • Roll of Gauze
      • Elastic Bandage
    • Splints
      • Popsicle sticks
      • shingles or thin board
      • 40 page newspaper or magazines
    • Heavy String
  • At least one change of clothing for everyone
    • including shoes

I've also thrown in a sweatshirt with a hood, an inflatable pillow, my scriptures (Bible, Book of Mormon)
88 posted on 09/15/2001 8:34:45 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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Comment #89 Removed by Moderator

To: crystal55t
It is really hard when you live check from check to do this. I know when I started my food storage, I was living from check to check. I started small, I would buy two cans of tuna, instead of just one when I went grocery shopping. When toilet paper went on sale, I'd buy three packages, and store two. Things like that. Whenever I got a bonus (which was very rare back then), I'd take half the money and buy food storage stuff. I think the most expensive thing was the medications. I have arthritis, and that stuff is expensive. And I think it was almost a change in attitude too as much as anything else. Here's a link to a site that has a list for weekly shopping, it is much less expensive.

Weekly Food Shopping list

Oooh, and here is a really good list on Food Storage for five dollars a week. Wow, this is wonderful. Here is the suggestion.

Food Storage on Five Dollars a Week  

Week 1: 6 lbs. salt  
Week 2: 5 cans cream of chicken soup  
Week 3: 20 lbs. of sugar  
Week 4: 8 cans tomato soup  
Week 5: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 6: 6 lbs. macaroni  
Week 7: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 8: 8 cans tuna  
Week 9: 6 lbs. yeast  
Week 10: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 11: 8 cans tomato soup  
Week 12: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 13: 10 lbs. powdered milk  
Week 14: 7 boxes macaroni and cheese  
Week 15: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 16: 5 cans cream of chicken soup  
Week 17: 1 bottle 500 multi-vitamins  
Week 18: 10 lbs. powdered milk  
Week 19: 5 cans cream mushroom soup  
Week 20: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 21: 8 cans tomato soup  
Week 22: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 23: 8 cans tuna  
Week 24: 6 lbs. shortening  
Week 25: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 26: 5 lbs. honey  
Week 27: 10 lbs. powdered milk  
Week 28: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 29: 5 lbs. peanut butter  
Week 30: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 31: 7 boxes macaroni and cheese  
Week 32: 10 lbs. powdered milk  
Week 33: 1 bottle 500 aspirin  
Week 34: 5 cans cream of chicken soup  
Week 35: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 36: 7 boxes macaroni and cheese  
Week 37: 6 lbs. salt  
Week 38: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 39: 8 cans tomato soup  
Week 40: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 41: 5 cans cream chicken soup  
Week 42: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 43: 1 bottle 500 multi-vitamins  
Week 44: 8 cans tuna  
Week 45: 50 lbs. wheat  
Week 46: 6 lbs. macaroni  
Week 47: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 48: 5 cans cream mushroom soup  
Week 49: 5 lbs. honey  
Week 50: 20 lbs. sugar  
Week 51: 8 cans tomato soup  
Week 52: 50 lbs. wheat  

Some weeks you will have leftover change. Save the change each week in a  
kitty to be used for the weeks you may exceed $5.00 (for example, as when  
purchasing wheat or milk). You will end up with:  
500 pounds of wheat  
180 pounds of sugar  
40 pounds of powdered milk  
12 pounds of salt  
10 pounds of honey  
5 pounds peanut butter  
45 cans of tomato soup  
15 cans of cream of mushroom soup  
15 cans of cream of chicken soup  
24 cans of tuna  
21 boxes of macaroni and cheese  
500 aspirin  
1000 multi-vitamins  
6 pounds of yeast  
6 pounds of shortening  
12 pounds of macaroni  

This should be enough to sustain two people for one year. For every two  
people in your family, add $5.00 more and double or triple the amount of  
the item you are buying for that week.  

90 posted on 09/15/2001 8:52:42 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
Thanks Utah Girl BTTT
91 posted on 09/15/2001 9:02:02 PM PDT by Inge_CAV
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To: Utah Girl, exodus, Inspector Harry Callahan, sinkspur
Thank you!
92 posted on 09/15/2001 9:27:28 PM PDT by carenot
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To: Inge_CAV
(((PING))))
93 posted on 09/15/2001 9:29:23 PM PDT by MHGinTN
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To: all
Don't forget this most important item...

Storage Goal:
50 cans of soup, stew or chili per person
5 pounds of salt per person
20 pounds fat, oil or shortening per person
aluminum foil, plastic wrap, storage bags, etc.
At least 5 gallons water per person--recommended is 14
gallons / person for 2 weeks

94 posted on 09/15/2001 9:34:43 PM PDT by Bassam_Abu_Sharif
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To: Bassam_Abu_Sharif
LOL!!!
95 posted on 09/15/2001 9:47:58 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
Tell us what to do with the wheat.
96 posted on 09/15/2001 9:50:49 PM PDT by carenot
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To: carenot
I think in the first month it says to buy a hand grain mill. I have one of those, also an electric mill. I grind it for flour, and make bread out of it. I also store flour (white) to lighten the bread up. 100% whole wheat bread is just too heavy. Plus cracking the wheat is a good idea. You soak it in water, and then you can cook it for cereal for breakfast. I've also thrown in the cracked wheat into chili and soups. I'll post some recipes tomorrow and ping you.
97 posted on 09/15/2001 9:54:12 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl
Thanks.
98 posted on 09/15/2001 10:07:26 PM PDT by carenot
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To: crystal55t
I do wonder though how many live from check to check though.

One thing to do is to buddy up with someone who has a fairly good storage routine already established. First off, they already have the habit of looking through the paper for sales on storable foods. Second, they can help jump start your storage by giving or selling you their older supplies as they rotate them out (hopefully before the expiration date, but you get the idea).

Personally, my rotated stock goes to a private school on the Navajo reservation and/or the food bank at the end of my block.

99 posted on 09/15/2001 10:14:41 PM PDT by SWake
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To: carenot
Tell us what to do with the wheat.

Aside from grinding for flour, you can boil it like rice and eat with a little butter, sugar, and milk. I sometimes throw a couple of tablespoons of wheat berries (whole wheat grains) into each cup of rice I cook to give it a little different flavor and texture.

100 posted on 09/15/2001 10:24:21 PM PDT by SWake
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