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Antarctic Seafloor Core Suggests Earth's Orbital Oscillations May Be The Key To What Controlled Ice
Ohio State University ^ | October 17, 2001

Posted on 10/18/2001 7:36:43 AM PDT by callisto

Editor's Note: This story embargoed for release until 2 pm ET Wednesday, October 17, 2001, to coincide with publication in the journal Nature.)

COLUMBUS, Ohio - An international team of scientists reported this week that a rock core drilled from the seafloor off the coast of Antarctica is the first to show cyclic climate changes in polar regions that are linked to cores taken from the ocean bottom in both temperate and tropical zones.

These records show ice sheet advances and retreats that match Milankovitch cycles - variations in the Earth's orbit around the sun, in the tilt of the Earth's axis and in the direction the planet's axis is pointing. The finding, reported in the British journal Nature, suggests a link between these orbital oscillations and the timing of Antarctic ice ages.

These new findings, however, show that Antarctic ice sheets advanced and retreated at regular intervals during a 400,000-year period.

The core was drilled in 1998-99 as part of the Cape Roberts Project, an effort by scientists from seven nations to retrieve climate histories trapped in millions of years of sediment beneath the floor of the Ross Sea. Drill sites located just offshore from the Transantarctic Mountains and near McMurdo Station, the main U.S. base in the Antarctic, have retrieved cores from three drill holes. The report in Nature discusses sediments found in the second of these cores.

While the Antarctic ice sheets formed approximately 34 million years ago, the parts of the core described in this paper were deposited during a period lasting about 400,000 years, approximately 24.1 to 23.7 million years ago.

Global temperatures at that time were perhaps 3 to 4 degrees C higher than they are today, similar to those predicted for the next century by current climate models that incorporate global warming effects. The amount of carbon dioxide in the air at that time is believed to have been approximately twice current levels.

For years, researchers examining deep-ocean cores from tropical and temperate parts of the oceans have used indirect evidence to propose that variation in the volume of the ice sheets in the polar regions was driven by so-called Milankovitch cycles.

But none of the cores drilled on the Antarctic continental shelf had provided the high-quality data needed to rigorously test that theory. And interpreting changes in polar climate based on evidence recovered so far-removed from the region in question makes many scientists uneasy.

These new findings, however, show that Antarctic ice sheets advanced and retreated at regular intervals during a 400,000-year period between 24.1 and 23.7 million years ago. The records in the core showed the cycles lasted approximately 100,000 years and 40,000 years -- the same time spans characteristic of some Milankovitch cycles.

"It appears that the Antarctic ice sheet has responded in a very major and rhythmic way during this period," explained Peter Webb, professor of geological sciences at Ohio State University and co-chief scientist on the project. "The growth and reduction of the Antarctic ice sheet at its margins is similar to that of the Quaternary Ice Sheets in the Northern Hemisphere."

That is important since most scientists believe that the more recent formation of the large Quaternary ice sheets, some 2.5 million years ago in the Northern Hemisphere, stockpiled water on the continents and caused sea levels to drop by as much as several hundred feet. Webb says the sea level drop indicated by these new Antarctic core is of similar magnitude.

Overall, the Cape Roberts Project cores record approximately 15 million years of Antarctic history. Within that history, Webb said that the team had identified approximately 46 sediment cycles, each of which contained a similar pattern of sediment layers. Each records a major glacial advance, followed by ice sheet retreat, and concludes when ice advanced again from the land into the into the marine continental shelf area.

"This is exactly what we would expect from a growing and receding ice sheet over time," explained Larry Krissek, an associate professor of geological sciences at Ohio State and a member of the Cape Roberts team.

What sets the new finding apart from other work is that the three sediment sequences described in the Nature paper contained known time markers that allowed researchers to date them precisely. The time markers included deposits of volcanic ash from eruptions of known dates; microfossils known to live during a specific period; and episodes when the Earth's polarity was reversed - all elements that helped to date the cores. Previous drill cores lacked the precise dating needed to test any paleoclimatic signal for a potential Milankovitch effect.

Within the Cape Roberts Project drillcores, researchers recognized climate changes that lasted a few tens of thousands of years. That observation let them identify climatic variations dating 17 to 34 million years ago. Previously, that kind of change had only been known in Antarctic ice cores for only the past half-million years.

Both Krissek and Webb, both researchers with Ohio State's Byrd Polar Research Center, were surprised with how rapidly global climate changed, based on the sequences in the core. Like evidence from cores below the seafloor in the North Atlantic, these segments suggest a transition from intense glaciations to a wide-scale glacial retreat may have taken less than 100 years.

"It should catch people's attention now since the change appears to occur in about a human lifespan," Krissek said. Both agree that the discovery places polar seafloor core research on a level with similar work from sites in the mid-latitudes, a significant accomplishment given the short time such work has been underway. Significant seafloor drilling for climate records only began in 1972.

"We've shown now that the Antarctic continent has a valuable archival record," Webb said. "Now we need to go to other parts of the continent and see if the entire ice sheet is behaving in this manner, or if our new record reflects only a small part of it." He added that researchers also must fill in the gap between 17 million years ago and the present, a time when the Earth has been considerably colder than the 15 million years before that.

The Cape Roberts project involves scientists from Australia, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States and is supported by the scientific programs of each of those nations. Cores retrieved during the project are divided and stored at two sites - the Alfred Wegener Institut in Bremerhaven, Germany and Florida State University.

Contact: Peter Webb, (614) 292-7285; Webb.3@osu.edu.
Additional telephone numbers for Webb include his home at (740) 927-2275, and the OSU Department of Geological Sciences at (614) 292-2721.
Written by Earle Holland, (614) 292-8384; Holland.8@osu.edu.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: antarctic; antarctica; atlantic; australia; catastrophism; climate; maunderminimum; milankovitch; milankovitchcycles

1 posted on 10/18/2001 7:36:43 AM PDT by callisto
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To: callisto
somehow I lost the word "AGES" at the end of the title above. Sorry.
2 posted on 10/18/2001 7:37:41 AM PDT by callisto
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To: callisto; RightWhale; SurferDoc; sawsalimb
Good report, thanks. More support for the Milankovitch theory, which I believe.
3 posted on 10/18/2001 7:45:52 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam
how does this relate to global warming theroies?
4 posted on 10/18/2001 7:51:36 AM PDT by Rustynailww
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To: *crevo_list
Bump.
5 posted on 10/18/2001 7:55:10 AM PDT by Junior
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To: Rustynailww
In the future science will probably realize that global warming is just the "effect" from the conjunction of these various cycles.An effect that repeats itself in a planetary supercycle every billions of years or so.
6 posted on 10/18/2001 8:01:55 AM PDT by callisto
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To: callisto
Correct. No reason to worry. SUV's are not killing us off. Its GOING TO BE O K !
7 posted on 10/18/2001 8:09:51 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: Rustynailww
how does this relate to global warming theroies?

I believe it shows that human activities have little or no effect on whether the earth goes through a cooling or warming cycle. These and other samples taken from ice sheets have shown that there have been period of cooling and warming for millions of years, and that the 'wobbling' of the earth on its axis accounts for the sometimes dramatic shifts from cool to warm.

I doubt very seriously though, that you will see this info on the Nightly News; it doesn't fit their view of the global warming story.

8 posted on 10/18/2001 8:14:52 AM PDT by SuziQ
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To: callisto
Good find.

See also " Little heat on the prairie" Grasslands acclimatize to climate change.

9 posted on 10/18/2001 8:16:31 AM PDT by Nebullis
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To: callisto
Like evidence from cores below the seafloor in the North Atlantic, these segments suggest a transition from intense glaciations to a wide-scale glacial retreat may have taken less than 100 years.

"It should catch people's attention now since the change appears to occur in about a human lifespan," Krissek said.

This guy just signed his professional suicide note. What he is suggesting here is that rapidly retreating glaciers have occurred repeatedly throughout our geological history, and therefore are not indicative of any human influence on the atmosphere.

Grants will be pulled, he’ll be ostracized by his peers, his work will be trashed as junk science, and a grad student will accuse him of sexual harassment.

He’ll be bartending to pay his mounting legal bills by the (“warmer than normal due to US industry”) spring.

10 posted on 10/18/2001 8:28:35 AM PDT by dead
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To: dead
it's often said that the TRUTH HURTS.
11 posted on 10/18/2001 8:35:07 AM PDT by callisto
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To: callisto; blam
I've thought for some years that what is being cried up as "global warming!!!-quick,we have to turn off the peasants' air conditioners!!!!"is,if it exists at all,simply part of a cyclical weather pattern that happens on a timescale that is long enough for us puny humans not to recognize.

An example of this could be Atlantic Coast hurricanes:according to a WSJ article that I read some years back,the hurricanes that hit the Atlantic shores run on a fairly predictable 20 year cycle. The things occur periodically,but you have to have good records for several hundred years to be able to see the pattern. Since most of the people who write articles on science for a popular audience have an attention span that is measurable in hours,at the most,this sort of observation seldom makes it into print,IMO. Let's don't even talk about the attention span of television reporters...

12 posted on 10/19/2001 10:22:52 AM PDT by sawsalimb
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To: sawsalimb
"An example of this could be Atlantic Coast hurricanes:according to a WSJ article that I read some years back,the hurricanes that hit the Atlantic shores run on a fairly predictable 20 year cycle.

I read a science article about hurricanes that show a longer cycle. For example, 1,100 years ago the incident of category five hurricanes were much greater than today, etc.

13 posted on 10/19/2001 11:32:16 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam
if I recall correctly,the article that I read claimed that the hurricanes in the Atlantic were driven by rainfall in one of the African deserts(the Sahel,maybe?-can't remember for certain),and that particular rainfall pattern had historically gone through a 20 year cycle of ups and downs. A 1000 year cycle wouldn't surprise me either,and in fact,I'd be more surprised to find out that one didn't exist,than to find out that one did.
14 posted on 10/19/2001 2:26:15 PM PDT by sawsalimb
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To: sawsalimb
"A 1000 year cycle wouldn't surprise me either,and in fact,I'd be more surprised to find out that one didn't exist,than to find out that one did."

Yup. I like your thinking.

15 posted on 10/19/2001 3:32:55 PM PDT by blam
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To: callisto
Some more information on Milankovitch cycles:

Milankovitch Cycles and Glaciation

The episodic nature of the Earth's glacial and interglacial periods within the present Ice Age (the last couple of million years) have been caused primarily by cyclical changes in the Earth's circumnavigation of the Sun. Variations in the Earth's eccentricity, axial tilt, and precession comprise the three dominant cycles, collectively known as the Milankovitch Cycles for Milutin Milankovitch, the Serbian astronomer who is generally credited with calculating their magnitude. Taken in unison, variations in these three cycles creates alterations in the seasonality of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. These times of increased or decreased solar radiation directly influence the Earth's climate system, thus impacting the advance and retreat of Earth's glaciers.

It is of primary importance to explain that climate change, and subsequent periods of glaciation, resulting from the following three variables is not due to the total amount of solar energy reaching Earth. The three Milankovitch Cycles impact the seasonality and location of solar energy around the Earth, thus impacting contrasts between the seasons.


16 posted on 10/19/2001 8:57:43 PM PDT by StopGlobalWhining
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To: blam
A good link explaining Milankovich's theory is at the University of Montana: http://www.homepage.montana.edu/~geol445/hyperglac/time1/milankov.htm.

I'd post it here, but the graphics total about 70K, and I don't want to bog down the thread.

17 posted on 10/20/2001 5:34:01 PM PDT by StopGlobalWhining
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To: StopGlobalWhining
Thanks.
18 posted on 10/20/2001 5:56:35 PM PDT by blam
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To: SuziQ
You ought to "check out" a novel called "The HAB Theory," written in, I believe, the mid-seventies.

It's based on Just Enough believable fact to keep your level of skepticism of "official" environmental information high!

A FUN Read!

I HOPE you're not prone to "Nightmares!"

Doc

19 posted on 10/20/2001 6:18:38 PM PDT by Doc On The Bay
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Note: this topic was posted October 2001.
 
Catastrophism
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20 posted on 05/27/2008 9:50:22 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______________________Profile updated Monday, April 28, 2008)
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