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Too Glad to Be True: Puritan Culture (my note: what they were REALLY like)
New Christendom Journal (from link by Presbyterian Layman Confessing Church site) ^ | 11/23/01 | David Henreckson

Posted on 11/23/2001 3:09:03 PM PST by rwfromkansas

Too Glad to Be True: Puritan Culture
David P. Henreckson

A vast and untamed wilderness surrounded the first Puritans who landed in New England. Civilization was unknown in this land of dense forests and deadly natives. Yet, miraculously, these same Puritans were able to carve out of this wilderness an oasis for cultured learning, the poetic arts, and theological training. As one Puritan recorded, “After God had carried us safe to New England, and wee had builded our houses, provided necessities for our livelihood, rear’d convenient places for God’s worship, and settled the Civill Government; One of the next things we longed for, and looked after was to advance Learning and perpetuate it to Posterity; dreading to have an illiterate Ministry to the Churches, when our present Ministers shall lie in the Dust.”[i] Based on this desire Harvard University was founded - just one example of many Puritan cultural achievements.

Os Guinness has written that “evangelicals are often surprised that one of the greatest examples of a Christian mind [or worldview] was at the beginning of the American story when conditions were most precarious and least settled – the Puritan movement. For Christians, no past age is ever a Golden Age, but in this case the first is - thus far - the best.”[ii] The evangelical mind is immediately stunned by this peculiar notion. Haven’t we always been told that the New England of Puritanism was the home of witch-burning and religious intolerance? And isn’t it true that anyone who wears black, buckled shoes is anti-sex, anti-woman, and a bigot? Yet before we go any further, it must first be acknowledged that the Puritans were by no means intellectual light-weights. If they believed in something, they had a reason for that belief. And if we are to challenge them, we had better have done our homework. No modernistic, knee-jerk reaction will suffice when you are dealing with the likes of Owen, Edwards, and Ames.

An aspect of Puritan culture which needs to be defended is its intolerance. Yes, defended. No, tolerance is not always a virtue. G.K. Chesterton once quipped, “Tolerance is the virtue of those who don’t believe anything.” The Bible teaches us what is to be tolerated and what is not, and we must conform our own standards of toleration to God’s. So when we look at the Puritan’s toleration standard, we should not compare it to the modern evangelical’s, but to Moses’ and Paul’s. However, it must be noted that the modern image of the bigoted Puritan is far from accurate. Modernism slanders anything which is contrary to its own set of beliefs, and Puritanism certainly fits that bill.

Many view the Puritans as depressing, schoolmarmish legalists. Like Chesterton, many view this Calvinist race as a people being forced to “wear their blacks in a sort of endless funeral on an eternal Sabbath.” The image is one of cruel eyes peering out at hopelessly lost souls, blazing with hell-fire and damnation. Is this our cultural paragon? By no means! While prejudiced individuals may believe the myth that “Puritanism is the haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy,” we should look to a far better, and truer, Puritanism. This race of Calvinists believes in what C.S. Lewis called a religion “too glad to be true.” This race dances through the eternal Sabbath and proclaims the news of our Lord’s sovereignty and grace to a lost people. This race radiates the light of the redemptive message so magnificently that the world will turn, look, and wonder.

Unfortunately, this brief essay cannot go to Puritan-like lengths to defend the subjects in question. Many wild myths have arisen to mar the character of the early Puritans. Therefore, our allusions to the Puritans will refer to their cultural ideology and accomplishments, not to their supposed quirks and sadistic evils. These slanders have been effectively debunked by others.[iii]

Sadly, even many today who claim to be the spiritual descendants of Puritanism are only living in the shadow of the mythological caricature of the dour Puritan. As we have emphasized before in this journal, a joyous and passionate life should be the result of a sound theology.

The Puritans themselves were founded in biblical, Reformation doctrine which readied them to build their great civilization on American shores. Their doctrine was not confined to abstract towers of ivory, or even to the four plain white walls of their churches. Rather, the foundational ideals and dogmas of Puritanism made possible the establishment of what are today’s most prestigious universities. They laid the cornerstone of covenantal theory which would be built into the American system of government. They were fertile soil for the growth of Jonathan Edwards’ philosophical and theological genius. In short, the doctrines of Puritanism gave early America its very character.

What system of doctrine made Puritanism so effective in cultural transformation? We could typify the whole of Puritan doctrine as theocentric, that is, as revolving around God and His glory. As the Westminster Assembly put it, “Man’s chief end is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever.” Whereas today’s “successful” churches and movements stress man’s “felt-needs” rather than obedience to God, the Puritans saw everything good, meaningful, and beautiful as deriving from the goodness, plan, and image of God. It was a matter of attitude. “The whole creature is resigned... to the obedience and glory of its maker,”[iv] said one Puritan.

When a man resigns himself to God, he is freed to live his whole life to God’s glory. No aspect of his life is untouched by his faith in his Savior: “The Puritan was determined to make earthly things divine, not by forbidding them, but by infusing them with holiness.”[v] This is a distinguishing mark of Puritan culture. In contrast to their Quaker neighbors in Pennsylvania, the Puritans purposefully endeavored to bring every aspect of earthly existence under submission to Christ. “If God be God over us, we must yield Him universal obedience in all things. He must not be over us in one thing and under us in another, but He must be over us in every thing.”[vi] This includes art, politics, and literature, as well as prayer and holy living.

The Puritans’ greatness rested foundationally in their theocentric theology and, as a result, their comprehensive worldview was tuned to transform the world: “Previous theologians had explained the world: for the Puritans the point was to change it.”[vii] For this reason, Puritanism shaped colonial America more than any other sect or philosophy. Whether you look at early American political theory, theology, or moral standards, you will see the deeply etched mark of our spiritual forbears.

The reign of Puritanism, however, did not last forever. The colonies at the beginning of the 18th century sadly lapsed into a materialism brought on by great prosperity. Some have argued that if this materialism had continued to spread in colonial society, there would have been no independent United States of America, for the covenantal principles of Puritanism would have been abandoned and the economically prosperous alliance with England would have continued indefinitely.

Thankfully, God sent the preaching of Edwards, Whitefield, and other great men of the faith to revive America once more, and the First Great Awakening was born. Unlike the revivals of Finney, this first spiritual awakening was characterized by the theocentric preaching of the Puritans. Emphasis was placed on God’s grace and Christ’s redemptive atonement; man was called to repent and submit himself to the authority of the sovereign God.

With this spiritual revival as the backdrop, the socio-political stage was set for seismic change. The English parliament was continually overstepping its constitutional bounds, and King George III was continually ignoring the colonists protests over the parliament’s actions. The Puritan idea of covenantal government once again began to be preached in the town halls as the tyranny increased. The King was bound to abide by his covenants with the colonies, and if he did not…

Thus was born the United States. While many have tried to prove the influence of deism and Lockean thought in the foundation of America (which was certainly present to an extent), no sane scholar can ignore the great impact that Calvinistic, Puritan theology and political theory had in the New World’s American revolt. In England, many epithets for the war - such as “The Presbyterian Rebellion” - reflected this influence.

Today we endure much more civil tyranny and theological thoughtlessness than did the colonial Americans; yet since we do not confess the theology or possess the vision of the Puritans, we have no way to deal with the Leviathan or the great Babylon. That ownership of sound doctrine must always precede social action and the resulting societal fruit is a lesson we could all learn from our fathers in the faith. Perhaps the day may come again when Reformational Christians are known by their love as well as their doctrine - by their belief in a religion “too glad to be true.”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[i] Quoted in Sydney Ahlstrom, A Religious History of the American People, vol. 1 (Garden City: Image, 1975), 198.

[ii] Os Guinness, Fit Bodies, Fat Minds (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1994), 22.

[iii] See especially Leland Ryken’s Worldly Saints: The Puritans As They Really Were, published by Zondervan.

[iv] As quoted in Horton Davies, Worship of the English Puritans (Westminster: Dacre, 1948), 9-10.

[v] Richard Schlatter, The Social Ideas of Religious Leaders, 1660-1688 (New York: Octagon, 1971), 11.

[vi] Michael McGiffert, Puritanism and the American Experience (Reading: Addison-Wesley, 1969), 35.

[vii] Christopher Hill, God’s Englishman (New York: Harper and Row, 1972), 222-3.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: christianlist; michaeldobbs; puritans
A little something for your consideration the day after Thanksgiving. This is not untimely to post though even though it is after Thanksgiving. We should be thankful ALWAYS and remember the roots that gave us this land.
1 posted on 11/23/2001 3:09:03 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: Uriel1975; Jerry_M; the_doc; Sovereign_Citizen_W; spudgin; JenB; oneofhis; Diamond...
bump
2 posted on 11/23/2001 3:12:10 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: Uriel1975
BTW, what did you think of my reply about Christian Recon/Christian Libertarianism? I know I answered without really knowing too much about the subject at hand, but I would like to know what you think.

I was surprised to find that it sounds like the Presbyterian Layman (PCUSA) might be a recon group...they had a link on their site to an article about the subject, anyway.

3 posted on 11/23/2001 3:14:01 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
By the way, could you folks pray for me....I am feeling rather ill right now....and I just went through another sickness about a month ago. I feel really bad, stuffed up and all.
4 posted on 11/23/2001 3:16:38 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
I appreciate your posting this. In a thread a couple of weeks ago concerning "economic models" and what theories should be followed I responded that it was the Puritans who laid the foundation for the overwhelming success of America's econmy... and that this, of course, had come about as a result of Martin Luther's Reformation. I have read several truthful, objective books on the Puritans - they are the "giants on whose shouders we stand", economy-wise. I would encourage anybody who is genuinely interested in WHY America was so, so different from all other nations and all other cultures in its early history to do an objective study on the Puritans. I believe we are still inheriting their blessings today.
5 posted on 11/23/2001 3:21:48 PM PST by waxhaw
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To: *Christian_list; *Religion
?
6 posted on 11/23/2001 3:27:00 PM PST by Khepera
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To: waxhaw
Because they supported economics to the glory of God and not to get rich, they cared about how teh economy affected everyone. This is part of why their views led to the American Republic. The influence of the power of the common man still continued to the Revolution time and while they were not selfish, they did not just want a few to hog all the cash...the founders wanted equal opportunity. It all goes back to Puritan hatred of both economic and political oppression.
7 posted on 11/23/2001 3:32:49 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: Khepera
What's the question mark about?
8 posted on 11/23/2001 3:33:27 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
too lazy to type bump
9 posted on 11/23/2001 3:37:28 PM PST by Khepera
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To: rwfromkansas
Excellent article - a keeper!!!

I have lots of Puritan ancestry, and am always trying to defend their way of life at the time they lived it. I see the absolute joy for life and belief in God/Jesus and their hope for life eternal in the 17th and 18th century wills I read and transcribe. Fascinating material.

You mentioned Christian Recon - what is that? I am a member of PCUSA, and read the Presby Layman religiously . It's a bit radical for the national church leadership - always quoting scripture, objecting to "tolerance" and "inclusivity," insisting on adherence to Reform principles, etc.

10 posted on 11/23/2001 3:42:37 PM PST by RandyRep
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Comment #11 Removed by Moderator

To: rwfromkansas
bttt
12 posted on 11/23/2001 3:48:39 PM PST by Don Myers
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To: RandyRep
Recon is short for Reconstruction...the belief that Christians should fight for the reformation of society to Biblical principles.
13 posted on 11/23/2001 4:11:25 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
14 posted on 11/23/2001 4:11:39 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
15 posted on 11/23/2001 4:11:49 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: RandyRep
The Layman had a great link to an article explaining Calvinism on their confessing church site not too long ago.
16 posted on 11/23/2001 4:12:43 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
btw, here is an article I wrote on Predestination. I have passed it out to kids at school who have asked about why I believe this. "Why I Believe Predestination"
17 posted on 11/23/2001 4:15:44 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
Bookmarked. Thanks, rwfromKansas.
18 posted on 11/23/2001 4:20:24 PM PST by Artist
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To: waxhaw
Funny, I had heard that the Puritans were big fans of wage and price controls. I conclude that God blessed them anyway .
19 posted on 11/23/2001 4:32:22 PM PST by DeaconBenjamin
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To: rwfromkansas
...), no sane scholar can ignore the great impact that Calvinistic, Puritan theology and political theory had in the New World’s American revolt. In England, many epithets for the war - such as “The Presbyterian Rebellion” - reflected this influence.

When news of the Revolution of 1776 reached England, Prime Minister Horace Walpole said in Parliament, "Cousin America has run off with a Presbyterian parson" 8^]

Cordially,

20 posted on 11/23/2001 4:52:27 PM PST by Diamond
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To: rwfromkansas; RandyRep
Recon is short for Reconstruction...the belief that Christians should fight for the reformation of society to Biblical principles.

Actually, distinctively it is the belief that society should be brought under the Law of Moses, and that the Church will bring in the Kingdom of God without the physical presence of the Lord Jesus. OT Law is taken literally, OT curses are literally applied to Israel, OT blessings are spiritually transmogrified and stolen by the church.

Dan

21 posted on 11/23/2001 6:05:02 PM PST by BibChr
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To: futurepotus
Here, for instance, is an article which (in contrast to yours) actually approaches some clear-eyed reality towards the Puritans.

Dan

22 posted on 11/23/2001 6:07:11 PM PST by BibChr
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To: BibChr
I think that is theonomy, a branch of Christian Recon. Christian Recon ranges from just trying to push societal change without applying the OT law, to theonomy, which does the whole shebang.
23 posted on 11/23/2001 7:14:35 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: BibChr
I lost my cool on that thread. What is sad is this "historian", ignoring any facts that disagrees with him, is also a teacher. How repugnant.
24 posted on 11/23/2001 7:33:46 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
25 posted on 11/23/2001 7:34:01 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
26 posted on 11/23/2001 7:34:12 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
27 posted on 11/23/2001 7:34:25 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
28 posted on 11/23/2001 7:34:46 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
29 posted on 11/23/2001 7:34:57 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
30 posted on 11/23/2001 7:35:16 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: BibChr
He is an AP History student, not teacher....as he is 15. I am a student also in that course.
31 posted on 11/23/2001 7:44:22 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas; Uriel1975; the_doc; CCWoody; RnMomof7
Great article!

As one descended from New England Puritan stock (my first American ancestor arrived on the "Lyon's Whelp", 1629, as part of the Winthrop expedition), and having read some of the journals of my forefathers, I have long known that the description of these first Americans as dour dispensers of gloom has been much exagerated.

Let us practice a Christianity that is so vibrant, "too glad to be true" as well.

32 posted on 11/24/2001 4:03:20 AM PST by Jerry_M
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To: rwfromkansas
BTTT
33 posted on 11/24/2001 4:12:04 AM PST by Fiddlstix
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To: rwfromkansas
It is amazing how distorted the view of Puritans has become. Far from the dour, humorless killjoys they are portayed as in popular culture, they were vivacious, outgoing, very happy people.

They wore bright-colored clothing and had an enthusiasm for life rarely found among those around them. They were quite tolerant of other points of view--more so than other religious groups of the time.

They believed life was to be lived and enjoyed. Having fun was a religious conviction. Their wine cellars were among the largest and most varied in Europe. They believed in moderation in all things, including a daily glass of wine or two.

They also prospered in business because they worked as hard as they played. The "puritan work ethic" is no myth. In fact, I took a History of the US Economy course in college and the professor insisted that it was the puritan work ethic that made America great in the 18th and early 19th centuries. The fact that they enjoyed and indulged in sex quite often also helped to grow the population at a time when that was vital to the expansion of the economy and growth of the nation.

34 posted on 11/24/2001 4:21:07 AM PST by Skooz
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To: rwfromkansas; Uriel1975; Jerry_M; the_doc; CCWoody
An aspect of Puritan culture which needs to be defended is its intolerance. Yes, defended. No, tolerance is not always a virtue. G.K. Chesterton once quipped, “Tolerance is the virtue of those who don’t believe anything.” The Bible teaches us what is to be tolerated and what is not, and we must conform our own standards of toleration to God’s. So when we look at the Puritan’s toleration standard, we should not compare it to the modern evangelical’s, but to Moses’ and Paul’s. However, it must be noted that the modern image of the bigoted Puritan is far from accurate. Modernism slanders anything which is contrary to its own set of beliefs, and Puritanism certainly fits that bill.

Wonderful read..I always ask where we are taught to be "tolerant" in scripture? It has become almost a religious tenet of faith thanks to the American PC culture.

I am currently reading "A Godward Life" Vol II by John Piper as a morning devotional. This mornings reading was entitled "The Root of Mental Health Being Healed by God". Sub title "Not helping people be happy on their way to hell"

One of the points in the sermonette is that the whole "God doesnt make junk" or "I am lovable" makes two mistakes first the root of mental health is not "self esteem ,but rather an enjoyment of God" and second and what it means to be "perfect" as in perfectly fitted for God's purposes.

It seems our Puritan ancestors understood this.The root of all happiness is seeing God and knowing him..

Thanks for posting the paper!

35 posted on 11/24/2001 4:34:01 AM PST by RnMomof7
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To: rwfromkansas
Hm; if that's true, then you know something I don't — which is certainly possible! But I don't know how I wouldn't have heard of it.

I am unaware of anything going by the name of Christian Reconstructionism which is not driven by this neopostmillennial theonomy.

But I certainly am aware of Dispensationalists, Amillennialists, and all other sorts of Bible-believing Christians who believe in applying their Biblically-gained wisdom to society.

Dan

36 posted on 11/24/2001 8:40:34 AM PST by BibChr
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To: rwfromkansas
It was distressing partly because, here we are in a conservative forum where we're all supposedly sensitized to liberal reconstructionism, and here this fellow ARROGANTLY just barfs up the typical liberal slanders against some of the finest folks ever to walk this soil! Ticked me off!

We need MORE Puritanical influence -- not less!

Dan

37 posted on 11/24/2001 8:47:06 AM PST by BibChr
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To: Skooz
The Pilgrims attacked the Puritans for wearingt "lace" and other highly forms of clothing that the Pilgrims thought was too worldly.

Furthermore, in Boston, a man was excommunicated after his wife complained to the church that he refused to have sex with her! Boy, what a bunch of people that could not stand fun (yeah right).

38 posted on 11/24/2001 10:20:05 AM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: BibChr
See, I read an article that seemed to separate out the Recons. Perhaps each group does have a true theonomic influence, it just varies. Beats me...lol
39 posted on 11/24/2001 10:22:40 AM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: RnMomof7
John Piper is exceptional! I have "The Pleasures of God" and it is one of the best books of theology I have read. Very enlightening and well-reasoned. An absolute joy.
40 posted on 11/24/2001 10:27:17 AM PST by Skooz
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To: Skooz
Sola Gracia introduced me to Piper a couple months ago..I am now a huge fan of his..I will get to "The Pleasures of God" at some point :>)
41 posted on 11/24/2001 11:15:49 AM PST by RnMomof7
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To: rwfromkansas; Jerry_M; Uriel1975; RnMomof7; the_doc
Os Guinness has written that “evangelicals are often surprised that one of the greatest examples of a Christian mind [or worldview] was at the beginning of the American story when conditions were most precarious and least settled – the Puritan movement.

Why should any Christian be surprised that God is SO GLORIFIED in the midst of the greatest of human struggles. Was our salvation purchased at a Sunday brunch? I don't think it says "Take up your cross and head for food." How could God be glorified in our salvation except that it involve the precious shedding of the blood of the Lamb and great struggles and dependence from the saints.

Any evangelical who asks such a question should also be asking just how the early Church grew so fast after Christ ascended. Why oh why would a Church grow so fast when it produced so many martyrs? Worldly logic would seem to suggest just the opposite.

Like Chesterton, many view this Calvinist race as a people being forced to “wear their blacks in a sort of endless funeral on an eternal Sabbath.”

Ha! If I have learned anything from reading my Calvinists friends here at FR it would be that they of all people should be the most thankful and joyful bunch around. God in the beginning chose us for salvation, which doesn't leave much room for grumbling. Still, I have been surprised to find that you fellows are not a stuffy bunch. I guess I'm revealing some of my prejudices.

Enjoyed!

42 posted on 11/24/2001 1:17:35 PM PST by CCWoody
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To: rwfromkansas
bump
43 posted on 11/24/2001 6:00:50 PM PST by tuesday afternoon
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To: rwfromkansas
Amen! thanks for the bump
44 posted on 11/25/2001 6:57:58 AM PST by sola gracia
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To: rwfromkansas
BTW, what did you think of my reply about Christian Recon/Christian Libertarianism? I know I answered without really knowing too much about the subject at hand, but I would like to know what you think.

I thought that your responses were worthy of a fitting response. I will try to organize one in the next day or so.

BTW, have you checked out Chalcedon's website of late? Much improved.....

I was surprised to find that it sounds like the Presbyterian Layman (PCUSA) might be a recon group...they had a link on their site to an article about the subject, anyway. 3 posted on 11/23/01 4:14 PM Pacific by rwfromkansas

"Presbyterian Layman" is, at best, an "evangelical" Presbyterian layman's communion doing their best to uphold Biblical Truth within the darkness of Theological Liberalism which has infested the modern PCUSA. Don't get me wrong; the simple "fundamentalism" of so-called "evangelical presbyterianism", as manifested by the "Presbyterian Layman", is a welcome antidote to the blasphemy of Liberalism... for the "evangelical" mind-set at least declares, "Some Things ought not be compromised"; and that is a small, but crucial, departure from the Liberal point of view.

But "evangelicalism" is a long way from the truly Reformed point of view, that "Nothing ought be compromised".

Don't kid yourself, my young friend. The evangelical "Confessing Movement" of the PCUSA (as exemplified by "Presbyterian Layman" are, currently at least, fighting little more than a rearguard action against the Liberals in the PCUSA. IF (as I consider most likely at this point) they succeed in effecting a departure from the PCUSA, they will still require a vast amount of discipleship to bring the views of their "somewhat-conservative" faction into adherence with those of the historical, Reformed presbyterian denominations. And IF (a possibility I regard as no more likely than a beggar's hope, at this point) the Confessors should actually succeed in winning their intra-mural battle against the Liberals within the PCUSA, then the challenge would be far greater still... the Orthodox denominations of American Presbytery would then be faced with the task of Reforming the entire PCUSA!! Sheesh... My back is already aching at the prospect of such a daunting task. Between you and me, I would not lay good odds on it, at this point.

So, I will wish the Confessors well... even as I await their break with the PCUSA, which I consider the most likely outcome at this point. Come out of her, God's People, and partake not of her crimes.

I shall look forward to re-visiting the Theonomy discussion re: Reconstructionism-vs.-Libertarianism, in a day or two.

Best,
The Orthodox Presbyterian (formerly Uriel1975)

45 posted on 11/26/2001 7:04:37 PM PST by OrthodoxPresbyterian
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To: rwfromkansas; oldglory; EthanNorth; Luke FReeman
BTTT for a GREAT post!

The Puritans would be horrified to see how feminized (doctrinally weak and lacking conviction) the professing Christian church of today has become.

46 posted on 11/26/2001 7:37:04 PM PST by Matchett-PI
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To: OrthodoxPresbyterian
Ah....wondered where you were...lol. Anyway, yeah, I really doubted they would be recon or even Calvinist (the Layman, that is)....but I was shocked seeing such links on their site...lol. In any case, I am glad I left and joined the Reformed Presbyterian Church.
47 posted on 11/26/2001 7:45:21 PM PST by rwfromkansas
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To: rwfromkansas
While prejudiced individuals may believe the myth that “Puritanism is the haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy,” we should look to a far better, and truer, Puritanism. This race of Calvinists believes in what C.S. Lewis called a religion “too glad to be true.” This race dances through the eternal Sabbath and proclaims the news of our Lord’s sovereignty and grace to a lost people. This race radiates the light of the redemptive message so magnificently that the world will turn, look, and wonder.

I heard one more leftist repeat this Puritan myth on C-Span last weekend.

Those who choose to pretend that there is no God can't understand this happiness because of misleading and misled folks lying about the Puritans, Jesus, Christianity and the free gift of salvation throughout the centuries. Happiness is believing. G.K. Chesterton once quipped, “Tolerance is the virtue of those who don’t believe anything.”

48 posted on 03/12/2002 1:38:00 PM PST by Ragtime Cowgirl
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