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The Dixie Dingo
Carolinadog.org ^ | U of Carolina

Posted on 11/30/2001 1:40:40 PM PST by blam

"The Dixie Dingo"

"The Native American Dog" "The American Dingo" " Southern Aboriginal Dog" "The Indian's Dog"

Still living Wild in the bottom land swamps and forests of the Southeastern United States.

Genetic (mitochondrial DNA) testing being performed at the University of South Carolina, College of Science and Mathematics, indicates that these dogs, related to the earliest domesticated dogs, are the remnant descendants of the feral pariah canids who came across the Bering land mass 8,000 to 11,000 years ago as hunting companions to the ancestors of the Native Americans.

However, their future in the wild looks bleak. Loss of habitat and competition from introduced species such as the coyote are driving these unique dogs to the brink of extinction.

The Carolina Dogs make gentle pets, winning show dogs, and good hunting/hiking companions - even when wild caught. They are willing, smart and never aggressive towards humans - alerting you to possible danger by standing at a distance and sounding a warning bark.

The same characteristics that have allowed them to survive for centuries in the wild are the same traits that make them perfect house pets: intelligent with a strong "pack" mentality that makes them biddable and submissive to their human "leader of the pack", healthy, clean (easily house broken with a desire to keep their denning area free of odor) with minimal scent (lack of smell ensured successful hunting and lack of discovery by larger predators).

Read on and see how you can participate in saving these unique dogs by becoming a member of the Carolina Dog Association, by contributing to the USC DNA research fund, or, if your circumstances permit, by owning a member of this great breed.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: agriculture; animalhusbandry; archaeology; biology; carolinadogs; clovis; cryptobiology; cryptozoology; dietandcuisine; dingo; dixie; dixiedingo; dna; dog; dogs; domestication; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; helixmakemineadouble; history; huntergatherers; mtdna; northcarolina; preclovis; precolumbian; southcarolina; vikings; zoology
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To: blam
Very good question. I have very little expertise in the first place,and what I have doesn't involve dogs. That said,this was an interesting article the first time,and it's still interesting.

I'm still thinking that the Carolina Dogs mentioned aren't a remnant so much as a reversion. I've been told that numerous animal species,when left to fend for themselves,revert back to their basic genetic stucture very quickly. It's my understanding that swine can do it in less than 4 generations-compare a high shouldered,loooonnggg tusked,extremely wary feral boar with his barnyard counterpart and one can see just how big the difference can be. My guess is that the Carolina Dog represents something similar-a reversion to "Dog,1.0 Release",if you will. They look like pretty decent creatures to have around the place-I wouldn't mind one or two myself.

21 posted on 11/30/2001 3:25:21 PM PST by sawsalimb
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To: blam
No, we came down through Grand Bay instead of Mobile-a little shorter we found. Was going to drive up there but my mother and siblings complained as they're not to much into botany...but this coming summer I can legally drive myself. Now whether my parents will allow me to borrow the car and leave them on the island remains to be seen... I did look on Dauphin Island for another rare plant that grows on the big shell middens on the backside near the causeway-could not find it. Looked for an hour or two in the hot sun, then got home and had two botanists tell me they'ld seen it, "just last year, all over the place." At any rate, this little thing is interesting: common named buckthorn something, grows on shell middens up and down the Gulf Coast, and a few places inland on limerock outcrops. One of the few native plants I know of that is so closely linked with archeological sites-there are actually a couple others that are limited to shell middens.
22 posted on 11/30/2001 3:36:24 PM PST by Cleburne
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To: Cleburne
"One of the few native plants I know of that is so closely linked with archeological sites-there are actually a couple others that are limited to shell middens.

I didn't know that. Why are they linked to archaeological sites? Were the plants used by the ancient inhabitants?

23 posted on 11/30/2001 3:41:52 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

I tried to enlarge this picture without success. I was so fascinated with this story that I still have this magazine. The dogs on the cover look more like Yellow Labs than all the other pictures posted.

24 posted on 11/30/2001 3:47:55 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
There are suposedly some plants the Indians brought from Central America-I've never seen them, though it wouldn't suprise me if they're there. The buckthorn grows on middens because of the high lime content-all those shells sitting there for thousands of years. It possible that you might find natural midden like sites-I've seen thick piles of shells high and dry on Little Dauphin Island-but most are limited to these lime rich sites. Not sure if Indians used the plants, altough they probably ended up spreading them unaware.
25 posted on 11/30/2001 3:49:44 PM PST by Cleburne
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To: Cleburne

This is what I called a "buttercup." Is it an insect eater? BTW, these are at the same site (as well as others) that I told you about on HWY 193 south.

26 posted on 11/30/2001 4:14:56 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
Beautiful animals. I'd love to own one, but I think my cats might have a thing or two to say about that.
27 posted on 11/30/2001 5:08:44 PM PST by white rose
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To: rintense
I remember that you are a dog person. Look at this.
28 posted on 11/30/2001 6:08:25 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
Thanks for the ping. Very interesting article, I love dogs too.
29 posted on 11/30/2001 8:10:01 PM PST by DreamWeaver
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To: stlrocket
Here's what they look like as puppies. All these pups are grown now and have been adopted.

Dixie Dingo Puppies

30 posted on 11/30/2001 11:39:26 PM PST by Nellie Wilkerson
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To: blam

31 posted on 03/19/2002 5:50:15 PM PST by Vigilantcitizen
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To: viligantcitizen
Picture of Buddy here.
32 posted on 03/19/2002 5:53:11 PM PST by Vigilantcitizen
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To: viligantcitizen;farm friend
Is Buddy a Dixie Dingo? This is an old thread, haven't seen it for a while. What was the picture in post #31?
33 posted on 03/19/2002 6:56:01 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
They don't look like yellow labs to me. Wish I could post pictures. Not that good yet.
34 posted on 03/19/2002 7:30:54 PM PST by farmfriend
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To: farmfriend
Click on my name to see my doggies. One is (suppose to be) a Yellow Lab
35 posted on 03/19/2002 7:42:31 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
Yeah, that one looks like a yellow lab. Had to laugh one day. I was looking through a dog breed book and they had a picture of a yellow lab labled as a golden retriever. And they were supposed to be the experts. My dad's lab is named Mike. She is a great dog.
36 posted on 03/19/2002 7:48:54 PM PST by farmfriend
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To: farmfriend
"My dad's lab is named Mike. She is a great dog.

Hmmmm. My dogs are named King Tut, King Ra, Nefertti and Boots. (King Solomon and Queen of Sheba have gone to dog heaven already)

37 posted on 03/19/2002 8:04:33 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
The original Mike was a black lab, male. Then we had Mickey, yellow lab, female. Now Mike, yellow, female. Go figure.

Second one down looks just like our Bean.

Well he acts like a dog anyway.

38 posted on 03/19/2002 8:12:34 PM PST by farmfriend
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To: farmfriend
Rats?
39 posted on 03/19/2002 8:21:07 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
Better than a Chihuahua or Pomeranian. Bigger than most of them too.
40 posted on 03/19/2002 8:26:47 PM PST by farmfriend
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