Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Forgotten Presidents (The presidents before George Washington)
Arx Axiom Newsletter ^ | Unknown | George Grant

Posted on 12/03/2001 7:42:54 AM PST by Luis Gonzalez

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-91 next last
Found this interesting, I hope you all do as well.
1 posted on 12/03/2001 7:42:54 AM PST by Luis Gonzalez (Blue3711@aol.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Ahhh, the crap you can find online...
2 posted on 12/03/2001 7:48:02 AM PST by paul544
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: William Wallace
Found it.
3 posted on 12/03/2001 7:48:24 AM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Hate to say it, but George Washington really was the first president of our Federal Republican government which we (theoretically) still have today. The presidents before him were actually presidents of the Continental Congress which was designated by the Articles of Confederation. We weren't so much a nation then, as a confederation of states. (You can find all of this neat stuff at snopes.com anyway...

;) ttt

4 posted on 12/03/2001 7:50:25 AM PST by detsaoT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: detsaoT
Yeah, I know, even the author acknowledges that fact, in spite of the fact that we operated as a confederated republic technically since 7/4/1776, and Washington ascended to the presidency in 1789.

Just interesting stuff some may have never thought about.

5 posted on 12/03/2001 7:56:30 AM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Thanks. The American Confederation deserves much more study and respect than it has received.
6 posted on 12/03/2001 8:10:58 AM PST by rdww
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Thankyou for this great reading. I continue to learn much in FreeRepublic articles.
7 posted on 12/03/2001 8:22:02 AM PST by Lewite
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rdww
"The American Confederation deserves much more study and respect than it has received."

I'll second that!

8 posted on 12/03/2001 8:37:27 AM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Thanks for this great article. It raises a lot of interesting questions: How did the Swedish Hansons become Americanized? How did Boudinot's decendant become a Cherokee? What must it have been like for a Scot after Culloden, leaving everything for the New World? And what would our country have been like had it kept the older form of the Presidency? I'm inclined to think that the stronger Presidency that the Constitution gave us helped to keep the country together, but it's good to see such a fine collection of upstanding and public-spirited citizens.
9 posted on 12/03/2001 8:45:30 AM PST by x
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Yes, the Confederation government had many successes to its credit. Frankly, I think we made a mistake by abandoning it.
10 posted on 12/03/2001 8:51:33 AM PST by Austin Willard Wright
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
BTT for later read.
11 posted on 12/03/2001 8:54:54 AM PST by jokar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
I found it interesting and enjoable reading.
12 posted on 12/03/2001 8:56:39 AM PST by Diva Betsy Ross
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
That's the article!

Good find!

13 posted on 12/03/2001 9:02:21 AM PST by William Wallace
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Very interesting! Here's a little more on Arthur St. Clair, after whom my hometown, Upper St. Clair, Pa., was named:

The Township of St. Clair was named in honor of General Arthur St. Clair, a controversial figure of the 18th century, who came from Scotland in 1755 and settled in the Ligonier Valley. During the Revolutionary War, he rose from Colonel to Major General and was the only Pennsylvanian to become a Major General in the Continental Army. For a time, he commanded Fort Ticonderoga before losing it to the British, for which he was later court-martialed. At the close of the war, he entered the Continental Congress and was its President in 1787. His last days were spent in poverty and obscurity.

14 posted on 12/03/2001 9:04:18 AM PST by mountaineer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rdww
"The American Confederation deserves much more study and respect than it has received."

I second that motion! Even in college, it is hard to find a course that does more than mention this part of American history in passing.

Pre-Constitutional law is also facinating. For instance, the "Northwest Ordinance" mentioned in the article, is still law and established the basic principles for the "Township and Range" system of surveying.

15 posted on 12/03/2001 9:10:15 AM PST by capitan_refugio
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: x; stand watie
Actually, according to a biography of Gen. Stand Watie, the Elias Boudinot who was a leader of the Cherokee was born with an Indian name meaning stag or male deer, and was commonly known as Buck Watie. He was the General's brother.

However, when Buck Watie attended the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, President Boudinot was his instructor (and funded his education?). Buck Watie then adopted the name of his benefactor.

Source: General Stand Watie's Confederate Indians, p. 12.

16 posted on 12/03/2001 9:12:53 AM PST by DeaconBenjamin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: rdww
"The American Confederation deserves much more study and respect than it has received."

I second that motion! Even in college, it is hard to find a course that does more than mention this part of American history in passing.

Pre-Constitutional law is also facinating. For instance, the "Northwest Ordinance" mentioned in the article, is still law and established the basic principles for the "Township and Range" system of surveying.

17 posted on 12/03/2001 9:13:59 AM PST by capitan_refugio
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Ask any school child and they will readily tell you "George Washington."

Ask any school child and he will readily tell you "George Washington."

18 posted on 12/03/2001 9:15:45 AM PST by Arthur McGowan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez; sheltonmac
Bump!!!
19 posted on 12/03/2001 9:21:39 AM PST by billbears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Austin Willard Wright
Yes, the Confederation government had many successes to its credit. Frankly, I think we made a mistake by abandoning it.

With Kalifornistan out of control and Oregon merily blocking Ashkroft, we can say that we now have a confederation of leftist states. Somehow the legal states always get short changed compared to the unrepenting ones.

20 posted on 12/03/2001 9:22:15 AM PST by lavaroise
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
bump for later
21 posted on 12/03/2001 9:31:18 AM PST by the bottle let me down
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: billbears
BUMP for Richard Henry Lee and his descendents.
22 posted on 12/03/2001 9:34:07 AM PST by sheltonmac
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: mountaineer
Don't forget ignominy. He was responsible for "St. Clair's Defeat," called the worst defeat ever suffered by US forces in Indian warfare, which was fought on November 4, 1791. More than 600 soldiers were killed when Indians infiltrated the US camp, which lacked adequate numbers of sentries.
23 posted on 12/03/2001 10:00:42 AM PST by DeaconBenjamin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
BUMP!

Excellent find.

24 posted on 12/03/2001 10:25:19 AM PST by Liberal Classic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
This is very interesting. However, the United States of America did not exist until the Revolutionary War was won. So, technically, George Washington was the first President of the Unitrd States.
25 posted on 12/03/2001 1:36:30 PM PST by wingnuts'nbolts
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wingnuts'nbolts
The British surrendered in 1781. Washington was inaugurated in 1789.

Someone had to run things in between.

26 posted on 12/03/2001 3:47:07 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
   This compilation is available (along with a whole lot of other really good info) in a small book called "The Pocket Patriot" (sub-title - An Introduction to the Principles of Freedom),
written by George Grant,
published by Cumberland House Publishing, Inc.,
431 Harding Industrial Drive,
Nashville, Tennessee
37211

ISBN #1-58182-092-5
Copyright 2000

   I bought my copy at the D.A.R. gift shop at the corner of Lexington Commons. I would like to find the same in a larger, hard-bound version.

(Yo! Santa! Didja catch that?)

27 posted on 12/03/2001 4:01:45 PM PST by Le-Roy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Le-Roy
bump
28 posted on 12/03/2001 4:08:24 PM PST by KantianBurke
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: lavaroise
Yes, the Confederation government had many successes to its credit. Frankly, I think we made a mistake by abandoning it.

With Kalifornistan out of control and Oregon merily blocking Ashkroft, we can say that we now have a confederation of leftist states. Somehow the legal states always get short changed compared to the unrepenting ones.

I've been considering what our country would look like if we ere still under the ARticles of Confederation. States would still reign supreme. The Fed had no power, but to legislate. No enforcement, no coining money, no military, no nothing.

Certainly would be interesting. Where is that alternate timeline thread?

Mr.M

29 posted on 12/03/2001 5:12:01 PM PST by Marie Antoinette
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: wingnuts'nbolts
The British surrendered in 1781. Washington was inaugurated in 1789.

Someone had to run things in between.

30 posted on 12/03/2001 5:33:35 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: wingnuts'nbolts
Oooop! Double posts! That will teach me to log off when I leave the house!
31 posted on 12/03/2001 5:36:41 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
These others were not presidents of the US, as we were not the US. There really was no true president until the constitution was ratified. Those prior were just great founding fathers and leaders who paved the way for George Washington, and those who followed him.
32 posted on 12/03/2001 5:42:00 PM PST by AlGone2001
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Marie Antoinette
Actually, there is a science fiction book which describes a "parallel world" in which the U.S. remained under the Confederation government: L. Neil Smith, The Probability Broach. It was published back in the early 1980s.
33 posted on 12/03/2001 5:46:25 PM PST by Captain Kirk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: detsaoT
You are correct. The Articles were a much different document. The president had almost no independent power. In terms of French history, that might be referred to as the First Republic and we are currently in the Second.
34 posted on 12/03/2001 5:49:39 PM PST by AmishDude
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
The British surrendered in 1781. Washington was inaugurated in 1789.

Someone had to run things in between.


Wouldn't these guys be governors?

35 posted on 12/03/2001 5:54:40 PM PST by Lady In Blue
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Lady In Blue
I don't think so, they presided over the Confederation.

"the United States continually had functioning governments from as early as September 5, 1774 and operated as a confederated nation from as early as July 4, 1776. During that nearly fifteen year interval, Congress—first the Continental Congress and then later the Confederation Congress—was always moderated by a duly elected president."

36 posted on 12/03/2001 6:49:03 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Fascinating stuff!!!

I have John Adam's new biography on my short Christmas list, I do so hope that Mrs. Santa was listening.

37 posted on 12/03/2001 6:57:52 PM PST by Roebucks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wingnuts'nbolts
"...the United States of America did not exist until the Revolutionary War was won..."

In reading the last paragraph of the Declaration of Independence, I see where the Founders may have not agreed with you.

"We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor."

The United States existed from the moment that the decision was made to break from England, the War was England not willing to sit idle and accept that break.

38 posted on 12/03/2001 6:59:04 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: AlGone2001
No, I'm sorry, but you are incorrect. We became the United States of America upon the signing of the Declaration of Independence, read the last paragraph on post #38.
39 posted on 12/03/2001 7:03:25 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: x
My questions concern the people living in the thirteen colonies at the time of the Revolutionary war. These people where French citizens, British subjects, Poles, Germans...how did they become American citizens? What if you didn't want to become an American citizen? Was there some sort of procedure involved?
40 posted on 12/03/2001 7:09:59 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Victoria Delsoul; VA Advogado; Howlin; deport; dennisw; Polybius
Mind candy for you all.
41 posted on 12/03/2001 7:24:39 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
I believe if you were present here at the end of the war, you became a citizen under the terms of the treaty which ended the war, and again under the constitution. The documents are at Project Avalon. You might be able to get an answer there. I couldn't. It may just be that when territory passed from one government to another, the people went with it. You could say that the Declaration of Independence made us Americans or Massachusans, Virginians, New Yorkers, etc. but many at that point would have wanted to remain subjects of the King.

If you were still loyal to the British King, you might have been during the war or at its end. But I've heard that well into the 19th Century, there were women in the cities of the East collecting pensions their husbands had earned from their service to the King. And there were also Tory families on both sides of the Atlantic who longed to get their property back. I don't know if they ever did.

What interests me is how people in the Dutch Hudson River Valley or the Swedish Delaware or Gaelic Cape Fear or Huguenot New Palz or Charleston, or German Pennsylvania, or the Irish frontier, came to think of themselves as part of one country with the Puritans, Quakers and the Cavaliers. Some of them never did, and remained loyal to the King, but others threw themselves into the cause of national independence.

42 posted on 12/03/2001 9:49:16 PM PST by x
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Good Read

He was the great uncle of Robert E. Lee and the scion of a great family tradition.

I never knew that.

43 posted on 12/03/2001 9:57:16 PM PST by Dan from Michigan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
George Washington: President of the United States

Peyton Randolph: Presiding officer of 'the United States in Congress assembled.'

Randolph and the others are no different from everyone in the House or Senate addressing the chair as "Mr. President" even though Bush is in the White House.

44 posted on 12/03/2001 10:05:40 PM PST by Styria
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Thank you for that quote. I see that I was wrong and that we were indeed the United States of America from that notification to Briton of our intent. Interesting stuff.
45 posted on 12/04/2001 2:58:02 AM PST by wingnuts'nbolts
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Actually there is a forgotten President AFTER George Washington. I am referring to post Civil War President, Grover T. Rutherford. Although largely forgotten today, this little known Republican President instituted Civil Service reform and was aligned with the Mugwump faction of the party.
46 posted on 12/04/2001 3:17:06 AM PST by PJ-Comix
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Historical BUMP!
47 posted on 12/04/2001 3:26:48 AM PST by Tinman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Luis Gonzalez
Thank you so much, Luis. Excellent article. Bookmarked!
48 posted on 12/04/2001 10:48:43 AM PST by Victoria Delsoul
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: William Wallace; Victoria Delsoul; Prodigal Daughter; afraidfortherepublic; billhilly; Billie...
My apologies to any who have been double-bumped!
49 posted on 12/04/2001 2:04:08 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PJ-Comix
This reminds me of a 1970s joke. Question: Who is Gerald Ford's favorite president? Answer: President Rushmore
50 posted on 12/04/2001 2:08:03 PM PST by Captain Kirk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-91 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson