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To: Luis Gonzalez
Thanks for this great article. It raises a lot of interesting questions: How did the Swedish Hansons become Americanized? How did Boudinot's decendant become a Cherokee? What must it have been like for a Scot after Culloden, leaving everything for the New World? And what would our country have been like had it kept the older form of the Presidency? I'm inclined to think that the stronger Presidency that the Constitution gave us helped to keep the country together, but it's good to see such a fine collection of upstanding and public-spirited citizens.
9 posted on 12/03/2001 8:45:30 AM PST by x
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To: x; stand watie
Actually, according to a biography of Gen. Stand Watie, the Elias Boudinot who was a leader of the Cherokee was born with an Indian name meaning stag or male deer, and was commonly known as Buck Watie. He was the General's brother.

However, when Buck Watie attended the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, President Boudinot was his instructor (and funded his education?). Buck Watie then adopted the name of his benefactor.

Source: General Stand Watie's Confederate Indians, p. 12.

16 posted on 12/03/2001 9:12:53 AM PST by DeaconBenjamin
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To: x
My questions concern the people living in the thirteen colonies at the time of the Revolutionary war. These people where French citizens, British subjects, Poles, Germans...how did they become American citizens? What if you didn't want to become an American citizen? Was there some sort of procedure involved?
40 posted on 12/03/2001 7:09:59 PM PST by Luis Gonzalez
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To: x
What must it have been like for a Scot after Culloden, leaving everything for the New World?

Well, I can sure tell you about one Scot after Culloden, Hugh Mercer.

A physician by training, he ministered to the wounded at the Battle of Culloden and then fled after the defeat. The Brits (as you undoubtedly know) went after anyone associated with the battle, and, as things got hot for young Hugh, he emigrated to the US and settled on the frontier in Pennsylvania.

He was a physician and Indian fighter, and accompanied George Washington, Dan Morgan, Daniel Boone, Horatio Gates and others with Gen. Braddock going down to defeat at Braddock's Massacre during the French and Indian War.

He loved fighting, and after the war when the PA legislature disbanded the militia (the Quaker State, remember) he moved to Fredericksburg, VA (George Washington's hometown) and was a physician and apothecary there(you can visit a reproduction of his shop today in F-burg).

With the coming of the RevWar, he was put in charge of the "Flying Battalion" (a sort of as-needed army) and was with Washington crossing the Delaware and at Trenton. He died a hero's death at the Battle of Princeton, refusing to surrender to five British soldiers who bayonetted him. You can stand in the room at the Clark Farm House on the battlefield grounds in which Brig. General Hugh Mercer died. All of the Mercer Counties in the US are named for him.

After General Washington, General Mercer is my most beloved RevWar soldier.

63 posted on 12/04/2001 6:31:55 PM PST by Pharmboy
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