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Top Ten Pieces of Music Written Before 1900
Me ^ | 12-05-01 | Pharmboy

Posted on 12/05/2001 7:02:28 PM PST by Pharmboy

Ask the question this way: If you were stranded on a desert island with a CD player and a good sound system, what ten pieces would you take with you that were written before the 20th Century?

My list:
1) Beethoven's Appassionata sonata for piano
2) Bach's Partita Number 2 for solo violin
3) Mozart's Symphony Number 41
4) Wagner's Overture to Tristan und Isolde
5) Beethoven's String Quartet Opus 131
6) Chopin's Ballade Number 4
7) Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto (IMO the only worthwhile thing he ever wrote)
8) Schubert's Impromptus (all of them)
9) Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata
and 10) Bach's Mass in B Minor


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: music
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To: Savage Beast
wait a sec ... all of puccini versus, uh, others, on a top ten list?

au contraire, sir, au contraire. i already nominated puccini with o mio babino caro, but after that? compared with some of the above? schuberts ave maria? jesu, joy of man's desiring? c'mon, man. time to break out the vinyl and give it a fresh listen.

101 posted on 12/06/2001 1:11:35 AM PST by johnboy
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To: johnboy
Whuuut??? Ya mean there was music back then? Roooock nnnn rooollll, maaaaan!!!

Kidding....heh...heh..

102 posted on 12/06/2001 1:15:31 AM PST by Looking4Truth
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Comment #103 Removed by Moderator

To: Pharmboy
The greatest composer of all time : Thyagaraja

(Contemporary of Mozart)

104 posted on 12/06/2001 1:19:50 AM PST by Nogbad
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To: Looking4Truth
Whuuut??? Ya mean there was music back then? Roooock nnnn rooollll, maaaaan!!!

for what it's worth, i got into a respectful disagreement with someone last night about whether benefit or stand represented jethro tull's crowning achievement.

zz top and zamfir are next to each other in my collection. ugh.

105 posted on 12/06/2001 1:20:05 AM PST by johnboy
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To: johnboy
Well Pharmboy's planning to take all of Schubert's impromptus.

Anyway, I like bambino caro and Ave Maria as much as the next guy does, but they're gonna wear thin after a few months, and something long, like La Boheme or something's gonna come in handy.

I'm not just crazy about Salome, but I fugure a year or so with it, and I might figure out what the hell Strauss was going on and on about.

By the way, I think I'll take Richard Strauss's complete works instead of Franz Liszt's.

P.S. I know I'm greedy. But there are worse things to be. And anyway, my mother always praised that as a virtue.

If you haven't heard Leontyne Price singing O Holy Night you're missing something. It's available at Amazon.com on an album entitled Christmas Adagios. Leontyne rocks!!

Merry Christmas, johnboy!
--The Savage--and easily soothed--Beast

106 posted on 12/06/2001 3:55:58 AM PST by Savage Beast
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To: Pharmboy; lawgirl
Mozart Requiem
Brahms Requiem
Beethoven 7th Symphony, Second Movement
Bach, B minor Mass, 'Crucifixus'
Any Palestrina Mass
Purcell, Queen Anne Funeral Music
Tchaikowsky, 5th Symphony
Brahms Intermezzi
Schubert Mass in G
Beethoven 'Pathetique' Sonata

I sound like I like the sad stuff, don't I? Maybe I could throw in a little Gilbert and Sullivan to keep my spirits up! LOL!

107 posted on 12/06/2001 4:00:14 AM PST by ohioWfan
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To: Pharmboy
Oh dear, I forgot to mention Dvorak's Stabat Mater! That one's a must!!!
108 posted on 12/06/2001 4:02:52 AM PST by ohioWfan
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To: Savage Beast
Mahler died in 1911, insane, because of all that gloriously emotional music he wrote, and the fact that he thought his 'Kindertoten Lieder' caused the death of his children.

He definitely belongs in the 19th century, musically, and I should have added his Resurrection Symphony to my list. It's a killer!

109 posted on 12/06/2001 4:09:22 AM PST by ohioWfan
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To: Pharmboy
what ten pieces would you take with you that were written before the 20th Century?

Well, since you said ten pieces, I'm going to label entire masses, operas, volumes, etc. as a "pieces".

1)Bach - Mass in b moll
2)Bach - The Well Tempered Clavier
3)Bach - Goldberg Variations
4)Bach - Magnificat
5)Mozart - Mass in c moll
6)Mozart - Requiem
7)Beethoven - Mass
8)Schumann - Frauenliebe und -leben, Op. 42 9)Brahms - Deutche Requiem
10)Chopin - Concerto in e moll

110 posted on 12/06/2001 4:15:10 AM PST by Wm Bach
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To: Pharmboy
Che Gelida Manina-Puccini (La Boheme)
111 posted on 12/06/2001 4:17:02 AM PST by Puppage
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To: BluesDuke
ME: I have heard that also...the prelims, the foreplay and then...and then...the BRASS COMES IN!

YOU: Translation: It's Ravel's fault that we call being sexually aroused being horny?

Brilliant!

112 posted on 12/06/2001 4:42:28 AM PST by Pharmboy
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To: ohioWfan
Your suggestions were especially helpful to me since we agree on a few that you've listed, so I would imagine I would also enjoy the ones you've listed that I am unfamiliar with. (And, I'm a Bearcat, FWIW, in case you're from southern Ohio).
113 posted on 12/06/2001 4:53:54 AM PST by Pharmboy
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To: wozzeck
I had a premonition that Berg would show up on your 20th century list. LOL!

Glad you jumped in the pool...

114 posted on 12/06/2001 4:55:56 AM PST by Pharmboy
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To: Pharmboy
All right, ya PANSIES....

Lets not forget any of the transcribed tunes published in O'Neill's Music of Ireland.

115 posted on 12/06/2001 5:05:04 AM PST by martin gibson
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To: denydenydeny
Assume you meant the cantata for Jesu. I don't think Myra Hess transcribed it until the 20th century.
116 posted on 12/06/2001 5:09:48 AM PST by jammer
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To: Pharmboy
It's remarkable how provincial and "center-of-the-universe" some classical music enthusiasts become.
The comments attached to the list are a humorous "my taste is more sophisticated than your taste" aside to this pompous exercise.

Gheeeeeez.

117 posted on 12/06/2001 5:17:43 AM PST by Publius6961
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To: Wm Bach
Beethoven's Ninth

Mozart Requiem

Handel's Messiah

Rachmaninoff"s 2nd Piano Concerto(no, wait, it premiered in 1901. Rats!)

Spem in Alium by Thomas Tallis(There's one you won't hear every day.)

Carnival Overture by Dvorak

I can't pick just 10, so I think I will just bring my whole collection. It isn't very large(yet), only about 250 titles. When I get up to the thousands, then I will make a desert island list. Nyah!

118 posted on 12/06/2001 5:23:08 AM PST by yawningotter
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To: Pharmboy
1. Bach: B Minor Mass (any challengers?)

2. Beethoven: Missa solemnis

3. Brahms: Motet, Es ist das heil uns kommen herr(sp?)

4.Mendelssohn: Overture to "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

5. Henry Purcell: "Hear my prayer, O Lord"

6. Bach: Fugue in D Major, Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 2

7. Beethoven: Symphony #9

8. Gabriel Faure: Requiem

9. Claude Debussy: Suite Bergamasque

10. Arrigo Boito: Mefistofele: Prologue

One doesn't really need to go past Bach to receive all the enrichment to the soul that music can provide.

119 posted on 12/06/2001 5:39:11 AM PST by Old Fud
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To: 1 FELLOW FREEPER
Mozarts Symphonia Concertante is pure heaven.
120 posted on 12/06/2001 5:44:03 AM PST by tom paine 2
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To: Mini-14
You haven't lived until you have heard the Liszt Etudes. Fortunately for me I don't need a CD player... just give me my Steinway.

My hat's off to anyone who can perform these 12 up to speed.

121 posted on 12/06/2001 5:55:27 AM PST by Wm Bach
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To: Pharmboy
"Pachabel's Canon is in the same category, IMO. I remember the first time I heard that...it was like "Where have you been all my life?""

You are so right ... I remember the first time I heard it was as background music on the Carl Sagan "COSMOS" specials. I had spent all of my high school and college playing in bands and orchestras and I had NEVER heard it before.

I've taken 24 variations of "Canon" from different CD's .. different arrangements, different groups playing it, different interpretations .. and placed them all on one CD. When I really want to relax and "chill", that's the CD I use ... one of the variations has ocean sounds (waves and birds) as faint background to it.

FANTASTIC!

122 posted on 12/06/2001 5:57:08 AM PST by BlueLancer
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To: Pharmboy
I am astonished your list leaves out the best. So here's mine:
  1. Handel's Messiah
  2. Handel's Messiah
  3. Handel's Messiah
  4. Handel's Messiah...
You get my drift.

Dan

123 posted on 12/06/2001 6:09:52 AM PST by BibChr
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To: Pharmboy
Numbers 3 and 4 are good. No Rossini?
124 posted on 12/06/2001 6:13:03 AM PST by <1/1,000,000th%
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To: T'wit
the Goyescas by Grandados (played by Alicia de Larrocha)

She's got these tiny little hands. Tiny! And the Goyescas have tenths, with wiggly stuff goin' on in between the spans all over the place. So me 'n the boys were all wonderin'...I mean...How's she do it?

125 posted on 12/06/2001 6:22:20 AM PST by Wm Bach
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To: Pharmboy
Dvorak's New World composed in 1893 is Top 10.
126 posted on 12/06/2001 6:30:12 AM PST by tx4guns
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To: Pharmboy
"Trois Gymnopédies" and "Trois Gnossiennes" by Erik Satie.
127 posted on 12/06/2001 6:35:23 AM PST by bwteim
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To: AFellowInPhoenix
Nope, it's already been mentioned ... Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite. One section is called "In The Hall of the Mountain King."

Ruh, Roh! The only part of the Peer Gynt Suite with which I'm familiar is the 'pastoral' sounding one that tended to be used a lot in cartoons! The only recording I have of it is on a compilation disc of "Relaxing Classical Music". I'll have to fire up the CD player and give my kids some culture while they're doing their (home)schoolwork!

128 posted on 12/06/2001 6:51:15 AM PST by SuziQ
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To: Wm Bach
3)Bach - Goldberg Variations Especially with Glenn Gould (love his humming along)

Bach's Orchestral Suites all of them ("Air on G" is from Suite #3)

Allegri's Misere Anyone who loves choral music should hear this, especially around Lent

Mozart's Marriage of Figaro, The Magic Flute (that'll get anti-Masons going)

Verdi's La Traviata

Widor's Symphony No. 5 in f minor for organ--the Toccata movement is wild--try playing it

Bach's Unaccompanied Suites Luminous and absolutely scary to play--no place to hide

Bach's Magnificat The Gloria movement is fabulous (especially is is you're in the middle of the chorus behind the orchestra)

Too bad we can't include Barber's Adagio for strings and Rachmaninoff's Fourth Concerto

129 posted on 12/06/2001 7:05:39 AM PST by Carolina
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To: wozzeck
You should try some of the newer stuff though too (after 1900)

I think that Richard Rogers' "Victory at Sea" (Copeland Too) is one of the better ones but after 1900 brings us into the Jazz, Swing and Rock Age and that is a whole new set of favorites.

130 posted on 12/06/2001 7:12:38 AM PST by Mike Darancette
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To: Carolina
Widor's Symphony No. 5 in f minor for organ--the Toccata movement is wild--try playing it.

No. And you can't make me. These boots were made for three pedals only. Any more than that and the brain freezes in overload. :^)

131 posted on 12/06/2001 7:15:00 AM PST by Wm Bach
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To: Wm Bach
These boots were made for three pedals only.

ROTFLOL!!!

132 posted on 12/06/2001 7:17:56 AM PST by Carolina
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Can't figure out for the life of me the fascination with the Pachabel Canon. I/V/vi/iii/IV/I/IV/V over, and over, and over, and over again. Sounds like some Lionel Richie ballad. No accountin' for taste.
133 posted on 12/06/2001 7:37:11 AM PST by Old Fud
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To: Old Fud
I/V/vi/iii/IV/I/IV/V over, and over, and over, and over again.

And that obnoxious Bach Passacaglia, or his Chaconne in d minor, or the song "House of the Rising Sun" or "Whiter Shade of Pale" for that matter...the only thing worse would be Greg Lake fronting for The Pogues in a cover of one of these songs. It would be Crimson and Clover over and over.

134 posted on 12/06/2001 8:47:50 AM PST by Wm Bach
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To: wozzeck
Sorry, but any mahler symphonies after the fourth were written after 1900......none of Mahler's symphonies after the fourth are worth listening to anyhow.....
135 posted on 12/06/2001 8:50:26 AM PST by Intolerant in NJ
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I'd add Dvorak's 12th ("American") and 14th quartets, and also some Mendelsohn (Hebrides Overture)
136 posted on 12/06/2001 9:11:31 AM PST by Virginia-American
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To: Harley - Mississippi
Rachmaninov's music can get pretty violent...?...well the first symphony is kinda bombastic and technically that's probably all we should consider, since it's the only major piece he completed before 1900...but most of his music it seems to me is actually more melancholy and hopeful than "violent"...he was a master at the slow, lingering, tender resolution of his themes, like the end of the Spring Cantata, all but the third section of the Bells, and the finale of the first section of the Symphonic Dances...nobody does it better, but it did come after 1900...
137 posted on 12/06/2001 9:26:04 AM PST by Intolerant in NJ
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To: SmartBlonde
Jane Olivor ?

FINALLY~ Someone ELSE who likes Jane Olivor ! Will wonders never cease.

Jane is one of the FINEST female singers ever.. I've worn out the vinyl album of "Chasing Rainbows"..played it so MUCH ...finally was able to find the CD.. Great album.. wonderful singer~!

138 posted on 12/06/2001 9:47:35 AM PST by Biblical Calvinist
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To: innocentbystander
Do you remember Bugs Bunny doing Liszt's second Hungarian Rhapsody?
139 posted on 12/06/2001 9:58:03 AM PST by T'wit
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Comment #140 Removed by Moderator

To: tom paine 2
Agreed.
141 posted on 12/06/2001 10:02:49 AM PST by 1 FELLOW FREEPER
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To: Wm Bach
> She's got these tiny little hands. Tiny!

I know, I know. SHE is tiny. Just amazing.

The lady has a surprising conservative connection in that she was "discovered" in this country by William F. Rickenbacker, then a senior editor of National Review. A concert-level pianist himself, he announced in an NR review that de Larrocha was undoubtedly the finest pianist in the world. Her concert career here took off after that. Rickenbacker and Bill Buckley (Spanish speaker, tolerable harpsichord player) became good friends with her. One of them said somewhere that Alicia could knock down a bottle of good red wine for lunch, then do a concert that evening without a missed note.

142 posted on 12/06/2001 10:07:44 AM PST by T'wit
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To: innocentbystander
Snorf!
143 posted on 12/06/2001 10:08:38 AM PST by T'wit
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Comment #144 Removed by Moderator

To: T'wit
Bill Buckley (Spanish speaker, tolerable harpsichord player)

I wonder if William Buckley still has those Bach Parties at his house, where they drink too much and many of the guests take turns cranking out fugues.

145 posted on 12/06/2001 10:18:41 AM PST by Wm Bach
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To: innocentbystander
> thats the truth in my case, and I am eternally grateful.

Amen to that. Nowadays, just about the only places kids CAN hear any classical music is in the old cartoons, a few old movies and a few commercials.

146 posted on 12/06/2001 10:18:50 AM PST by T'wit
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To: Wm Bach
Can't say, but he has a very long history of presenting top performers at National Review events. For instance, Rosalyn Turek played at several anniversary banquets. His father treated the ten Buckley kids to interesting concerts at their home in Sharon, CT -- famously, Fats Waller concerts in the garage!
147 posted on 12/06/2001 10:24:18 AM PST by T'wit
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To: T'wit
Sharon? Hey, I'm not too far from there. He should invite me over to play some original (i.e. ripped off styles from others) compositions so I can be famous and drink too much wine.

Fats was great, but Art Tatum, to borrow a phrase from the movie Amadeus played "too many notes." No one comes close.

148 posted on 12/06/2001 10:33:24 AM PST by Wm Bach
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To: Pharmboy
bookmark bump
149 posted on 12/06/2001 10:40:31 AM PST by Cacique
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To: Intolerant in NJ
Sure, Mahler #5-9 are worth listening to. Any decent musicologist will tell you that Mahler #1 ends with the last movement of #9. He wrote them so that one leads to the next, so if you stop at #4 you're kind of missing the point.
150 posted on 12/06/2001 10:41:58 AM PST by wozzeck
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