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Top Ten Pieces of Music Written Before 1900
Me ^ | 12-05-01 | Pharmboy

Posted on 12/05/2001 7:02:28 PM PST by Pharmboy

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To: Pharmboy
In no particular order of preference:

Handel, Water Music (There is a brilliant recording of the complete, unedited Water Music suites by Pierre Boulez conducting the New York Philharmonic.)
Debussy, La Mer
Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 5 ("Emperor")
Mendelssohn, Violin Concerto (specifically, its interpretation by Isaac Stern, may his soul rest in peace)
Bach, Concerto For Two Violins and Orchestra (my favourite: Isaac Stern, Itzhak Perlman; New York Philarmonic, Zubin Mehta - Conductor)
Vivaldi, The Four Seasons (my favourite: Itzhak Perlman conducting the Israel Philharmonic)
Brahms, Violin Concerto
Tchaikovsky, Piano Concerto No. 1 (as performed by Philippe Entremont, piano; New York Philarmonic, Leonard Bernstein - Conductor)
Debussy, L'Apres Midi d'un Faune (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun) (New York Philarmonic version)
Dvorak, Symphony in E Minor ("For The New World") (I've always been especially partial to the recording by the Cleveland Orchestra with George Szell...)
51 posted on 12/05/2001 7:54:44 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: Pharmboy
Here's one lady's (mine) choices:

Four Seasons - Vivaldi
Violin Concerto No. 3 - Mozart
Brandenburg Concertos No. 3 & 9 - Bach
Trumpet Tune and Air - Purcell

and ... most of the things others have listed above.

52 posted on 12/05/2001 7:54:50 PM PST by RightField
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To: Pharmboy
Schumann Symphony #1
" Piano Concerto
Brahms Symphony #1
Saint Saens Symphony #3--"The Organ"
Mendelsohn Hebrides Overture
Grieg Peer Gynt
Beethoven Emporer Concerto
Schubert Incidental Music to Rosamunde
Mozart Violin Concerto #5 "Turkish"
Dvorak Symphony #9 "From the New World"
53 posted on 12/05/2001 7:55:19 PM PST by gusopol3
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To: 1 FELLOW FREEPER
Aw c'mon...it's not like I picked the PIANO concerto. And actually, I could have easily filled it up just with Ludwig's piano stuff. If you scroll down a few from the top, you'll notice that I DID exchange the Violin concerto for the Mozart Requiem when Sam Adams brought it up.
54 posted on 12/05/2001 7:57:23 PM PST by Pharmboy
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Comment #55 Removed by Moderator

To: Pharmboy
1. 1812
2. Beethoven's Ninth
3. Cannon in D
4. Messiah
5. Four Seasons
6. Eine Kliene Nachtmusick (sp?)
7. Die Valkyrie
8. Bradenburg Concertos
9. Toccata and Fugue in D minor
10. Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring
56 posted on 12/05/2001 7:59:41 PM PST by jae471
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To: Pharmboy
A better cut-off point would be 1800, with the baroque and early classical composers such as Handel, Vivaldi, Bach, Mozart.
57 posted on 12/05/2001 8:00:02 PM PST by keta
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To: BluesDuke
We've had many votes for Water Music; it perhaps leads the league at this point in votes. And thanks for reminding me about the Bach Double Violin Concerto. I wore out one LP of that piece when I was in college.
58 posted on 12/05/2001 8:00:24 PM PST by Pharmboy
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To: Pharmboy
#42
Mr. RightField fondly remembers his high school football days here in Southern California where Bolero was played in the locker room each week as the players dressed for the game. (As his long suffering wife (hehe), I still must endure old football war stories each time we hear even a short snippet of Bolero).
59 posted on 12/05/2001 8:00:29 PM PST by RightField
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To: RightField
Trumpet Tune and Air - Purcell

Excellent Choice.

60 posted on 12/05/2001 8:00:32 PM PST by jae471
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To: Pharmboy
Mozart- Symphony #40
Mozart- Eine Kleine Nachtmusik
Chopin- Nocturne #2
61 posted on 12/05/2001 8:03:16 PM PST by Sandshark
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To: keta
That is an excellent suggestion keta--please, start another list tomorrow. It should be quite interesting. Other than Bach, Handel, Hayden, Mozart, early Beethoven and Albioni, I don't know much else.
62 posted on 12/05/2001 8:03:20 PM PST by Pharmboy
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To: innocentbystander
I like your entire list, but I would have tossed out Strauss in favor of Rossini's The Barber if Seville. My absolute favorite.

Promise not to shoot if I say I prefer The Rabbit of Seville (classic Warner Brothers animated satire with Bugs Bunny as the barber)...*grin*...I'm not much for opera, but I do enjoy The Magic Flute (Mozart) and Tremonisha (Scott Joplin - his only opera)

Kind of a shame to have noted this as pre-1900, otherwise I'd have added to my list (assuming we are staying with classical music) Mr. Gershwin himself playing Rhapsody in Blue, a recording of which I have - well, it's Gershwin's own piano roll, accompanied by Michael Tilson Thomas conducting the London Symphony Orchestra, but it is still breathtaking.
63 posted on 12/05/2001 8:03:57 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: Pharmboy
Tomaso Albinoni - Adaigio in G Minor
Bach - Brandenburg Concerto
Beethoven - 5th Symphony, 9th Symphony, Moonlight Sonata
Wagner - Ride of the Valkeries
Debussy - Claire de Lune
64 posted on 12/05/2001 8:04:23 PM PST by Big Guy and Rusty 99
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To: SamAdams76
Wagner - Ring Cycle

When Sam Clements (Mark Twain) toured europe, he attended a Wagnerian Opera.
When asked what he thought of Wagner, Sam replied "His music is better than it sounds."

65 posted on 12/05/2001 8:05:12 PM PST by rightofrush
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To: RightField
Wow! What the hey is it about high school and Bolero?? I bet some psychologist wrote an article about how it has positive effects on young men. My high school was all male and had 4700 students.
66 posted on 12/05/2001 8:05:49 PM PST by Pharmboy
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To: Pharmboy
We've had many votes for Water Music; it perhaps leads the league at this point in votes.

Which is kind of why I made a point of mentioning the Boulez recording - when I bought it back in the early 1980s, it was at the time one of the extremely few recordings of the complete Water Music, and for my money it's the richest of the lot.
67 posted on 12/05/2001 8:06:16 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: Pharmboy
Strauss - Don Juan Symphonic poem for orchestra
68 posted on 12/05/2001 8:06:44 PM PST by Big Guy and Rusty 99
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Comment #69 Removed by Moderator

To: Pharmboy
...What the hey is it about high school and Bolero?? I bet some psychologist wrote an article about how it has positive effects on young men.

I am still trying to figure out why there have been those who swear Bolero is so ideal for, er, romantically intimate (ho ho ho) interludes. Frankly, I have never felt any impulse during any playing of Bolero except, perhaps, to take up bullfighting...
70 posted on 12/05/2001 8:08:48 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: BluesDuke
I have heard that also...the prelims, the foreplay and then...and then...the BRASS COMES IN!
71 posted on 12/05/2001 8:10:48 PM PST by Pharmboy
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To: Pharmboy
Other than Bach, Handel, Hayden, Mozart, early Beethoven and Albioni, I don't know much else.

You know enough, enough to inclue Hayden, which few have.
IMHO, I do think that Beethoven's 9th is the best piece of music that man has created, with all of Bach taking 2nd, and all of Hayden 3rd.

72 posted on 12/05/2001 8:11:52 PM PST by rightofrush
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To: Pharmboy
Beautiful music depends on the ear of the listener. Beethoven is quoted as saying: "He who truly understands my music must thereby go free of all the misery which others bear about with them". Makes you almost feel sorry for those who can't "hear" the music. It actually doesn't register with many people and then to varying degrees. There is such a wealth of great music. Try Beethoven's 3rd and 4th Piano Concertos with Murry Perahia on the Piano. Also Beethoven's Triple Concerto. Verdi's Nabucco Opera is another piece I love but didn't see here.
73 posted on 12/05/2001 8:12:11 PM PST by TheLion
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To: innocentbystander
Your secret is safe with me!

(P.S. Do you remember an even more classic laceration of one of the classics? The Looney Tuners had a brilliant - and Oscar-winning - whack at Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries in What's Opera, Doc?...and, brother, did Bugs Bunny give a rather pompous opera singer named Giovanni Jones what for - not to mention a not-bad impersonation of Leopold Stokowski - in Long Haired Hare. Come to think of it, think of it this way: if the Warner Brothers gang could have made as many excellent comedies as they did spun off classical music, what does it tell you that they were even aware of such music, compared to today's cartoonists who wouldn't be able to tell Rachmaninoff from Kid Rock, Mendelssohn from Eminem?)
74 posted on 12/05/2001 8:12:23 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: Pharmboy
recommend Mozart's Requiem

Looking it up ...
Mozart: Requiem
  von Karajan or Carlo Maria Giulini ? (i'm a bit partial to Herr Karajan's "god and thunder" interpretations).

On my next Amazon order.

75 posted on 12/05/2001 8:12:38 PM PST by dread78645
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To: Pharmboy
I have heard that also...the prelims, the foreplay and then...and then...the BRASS COMES IN!

Translation: It's Ravel's fault that we call being sexually aroused being horny?
76 posted on 12/05/2001 8:13:25 PM PST by BluesDuke
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Comment #77 Removed by Moderator

Comment #78 Removed by Moderator

To: Pharmboy
Anything Rachmaninov wrote before 1900, if that has to be the cutoff....
79 posted on 12/05/2001 8:15:51 PM PST by Intolerant in NJ
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Comment #80 Removed by Moderator

To: Pharmboy
two great classical sites:

classical.net

karadar.it

81 posted on 12/05/2001 8:20:24 PM PST by Big Guy and Rusty 99
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To: Chi-townChief
The Thieving Magpies. My Dad has a music box that plays that. It's wonderful. I may have to look for that on CD. Any particular recording you would recommend?
82 posted on 12/05/2001 8:20:36 PM PST by TX Bluebonnet
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To: innocentbystander
Are you my long lost brother? I thought it was just me! Unbeliveable!!! Do you have any idea how to get tapes of those episodes? They were classic!!

They are still classic, too! And - just keep an ear cocked to the Cartoon Network, since it shows them very regularly; as, also, such gems as these among my top favourites:

Dough For The Do-Do (Or: Dali meets Porky!)
Tweety and the Beanstalk (Classic line: The giant makes his entrance - Fee, fi, fo, fat - I tawt I taw a puddy tat!)
Porky's Duck Hunt (Daffy Duck makes his premiere, with lots of "whoo-hoo!" and one line of dialogue: Her-her-her-her-her...don't let it bother ya, chief...I'm just a crazy, darn fool duck!)
Baseball Bugs (Bugs takes on the Gas House Gorillas - they made baseball's real Gas House Gang, the 1931-35 St. Louis Cardinals - resemble tea time with the Daughters of the American Revolution)
You Ought To Be In Pictures (Daffy bugs Porky to defect from the 'toons and have a whack at feature films - which he does, mingling and mangling on an actual WB film set. Cameo appearance by Looney Tunes mastermind-cum-tyrant Leon Schlesinger himself.)
I forget the title, but it's a Road Runner cartoon in which Bugs Bunny stands in for the Road Runner. (Classic line: Oh, uh, hi, folks. The Road Runner hurt his knee making a hairpin turn, so they asked me to finish this picture for him...let's see...this is about where the Road Runner goes......and then blam! he's off at supersonic speed a la Mr. Beep-Beep...)

Ballot Box Bunny (Bugs against Yosemite Sam for mayor. Classic line, and probably pondered by some Clintonista speechwriters: Yosemite Sam campaigning, bellowing out, There's enough fresh air and sunshine in this greeeeeeeeat country of ours for everybody, and I'll see to it that you get yours! One flaw: Cartoon Network, for some dumb reason, edited out the classic finish, where Bugs and Sam stand dumbstruck down Main Street after the Dark Horse - a horse, in fact - won the election. Bugs: Anyone for a game of Russian Roulette? Sam: Hands Bugs the pistol. Picture fades to black. Bang! Bugs (ears spread outward): Heh! I missed! Sam (blown up in the face): Aaaaaaah hate that rabbit!)

....just for openers...
83 posted on 12/05/2001 8:25:48 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: johnboy
the second movement from ???, y'know, in the hall of the mountain kings, and all that.

Wasn't that Mazursky? One piece I hear from time to time on classical radio that is very haunting and beautiful is Ravel's "Pavane for a Dead Princess". But I am partial to the CHORAL classics, "Ode to Joy", 'The Messiah". Right now I am enjoying myself to death listening to classical Christmas music, Gregorian chants, Medieval and Renaissance music, and especially British music.

I attended a concert Sunday night which was exclusively English Christmas music including 4 of my all time favorites "In the Bleak Midwinter", "What Sweeter Music" (I cheat, it's late 20th cent. John Rutter), "Lullaby for Christmas" (a Welsh tune I first heard sung in the movie 'Empire of the Sun') and finally another cheat, Ralph Vaughn Williams' "Fantasia on Christmas Carols" Look em up, folks. They are all a delight to the ears and portray the TRUE meaning of Christmas!

84 posted on 12/05/2001 8:27:48 PM PST by SuziQ
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To: SuziQ
In The Bleak Midwinter

Ah ... I have sweet childhood memories of that one. Truly a beautiful song. I have a collection of old hymnals and, sadly, that song is only in one of them. But at least I have one copy of the music.

85 posted on 12/05/2001 8:37:06 PM PST by RightField
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To: MozartLover
Therrrrrrrre ya go!
86 posted on 12/05/2001 8:43:20 PM PST by 1 FELLOW FREEPER
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To: Pharmboy
"Aw c'mon...it's not like I picked the PIANO concerto. And actually, I could have easily filled it up just with Ludwig's piano stuff. If you scroll down a few from the top, you'll notice that I DID exchange the Violin concerto for the Mozart Requiem when Sam Adams brought it up"
Good Job. Actually, I would find it impossible to narrow it down to a top ten....fun to try though.
87 posted on 12/05/2001 8:49:59 PM PST by 1 FELLOW FREEPER
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To: Pharmboy
Not in any particular order: I like Madrigals

Baroque music

Handel's Messiah

Bach's organ music

Strauss' Waltzes

and thinking that by the time mozart was my age he would have already been dead 20 years!

88 posted on 12/05/2001 8:55:09 PM PST by lexington minuteman 1775
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To: BluesDuke
I got em all off the Cartoon Network over a number of years. Great stuff!
89 posted on 12/05/2001 9:00:26 PM PST by 1 FELLOW FREEPER
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To: Pharmboy
Only 10? Can't live without at least 12:

1) Liszt Transcendental Etude #1 in C major (Preludio)
2) Liszt Transcendental Etude #2 in A minor
3) Liszt Transcendental Etude #3 in F major (Paysage)
4) Liszt Transcendental Etude #4 in D minor (Mazeppa)
5) Liszt Transcendental Etude #5 in B flat major (Feux follets)
6) Liszt Transcendental Etude #6 in G minor (Vision)
7) Liszt Transcendental Etude #7 in E flat major (Eroica)
8) Liszt Transcendental Etude #8 in C minor (Wilde Jagd)
9) Liszt Transcendental Etude #8 in A flat major (Ricordanza)
10) Liszt Transcendental Etude #9 in F minor (Apassionata)
11) Liszt Transcendental Etude #10 in D flat major (Harmonies du soir)
12) Liszt Transcendental Etude #12 in B flat minor (Chasse-neige)

You haven't lived until you have heard the Liszt Etudes. Fortunately for me I don't need a CD player... just give me my Steinway.

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90 posted on 12/05/2001 9:07:11 PM PST by Mini-14
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To: Pharmboy
Bach's Jesu, the Joy of Man's Desiring

Get the Trumpet solo version.

91 posted on 12/05/2001 9:14:57 PM PST by Mike Darancette
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To: Pharmboy
Mahler's Ninth

Mahler's 8th.

92 posted on 12/05/2001 9:16:33 PM PST by Mike Darancette
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To: Pharmboy
Mostly my classical tastes have been acquired through my father's collection of music, which included a small sampling of "studying" classics that he used to help him through college (ie, he played them in the background while studying). Anyway here are my list of favorites that are tilted somewhat heavily in favor of that collection:

1812 Overture - Tchaikovsky
Scheherazade - Rimsky-Korsakov
Symphony 6 (Pathetique) - Tchaikovsky
Eine Kleine Nacht Musik - Mozart
Symphonies 5,6,7,8,9 - Beethoven
Symphony 40 - Mozart
Marche Slave - Tchaikovsky
Piano Concerto No. 1 - Tchaikovsky
Symphony 4 - Brahms
William Tell Overture - Rossini

By the way, there's a great website where you can listen live to streaming classical music and also view the top 300 all-time list of classics (click on Playlist|Hall of Fame) as voted upon by their listeners: Classic FM

93 posted on 12/05/2001 9:22:32 PM PST by Humbug
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To: BluesDuke
not to mention a not-bad impersonation of Leopold Stokowski

Actually the Stokowski rendition of the Ave Maria for Disney's Fantasia in 1939 is probably one of the most moving pieces of music ever performed. (IMO)

94 posted on 12/05/2001 9:26:29 PM PST by Mike Darancette
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To: Mike Darancette
If you're talking moving, I agree. *grin* But we were talking satire up above. (Though, in truth, Stokowski seems not to have been that easy to impersonate...)
95 posted on 12/05/2001 9:37:16 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: Pharmboy
Great thread! Next time, don't limit it to 'pre-1900' because then I have to omit my REAL favorites:

Lee Ritenour; David Benoit; Randy Crawford; Arturo Sandoval; Diane Schur, and my husband's favorite: Jane Olivor.

For pre-1900:

Dvorak: Symphony in # Minor

Vivaldi: Four Seasons

Debussy: La Mer

My favorite opera: (don't laugh) Tosca & Madame Butterfly

96 posted on 12/05/2001 9:42:44 PM PST by SmartBlonde
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To: Pharmboy
Wot, no Grieg? I'll take his Piano Concerto if no one else has it.
97 posted on 12/05/2001 10:14:19 PM PST by Guillam
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To: SuziQ
the second movement from ???, y'know, in the hall of the mountain kings, and all that.

Wasn't that Mazursky?

Nope, it's already been mentioned ... Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite. One section is called "In The Hall of the Mountain King."

98 posted on 12/05/2001 11:18:21 PM PST by Boomer Geezer
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To: All
Seems all my favorites have been mentioned, except one: Sibelius' Finlandia. However, I don't know if I'd include it in my own Top 10 list, but there are times I go on a Finlandia jag, and play the thing over and over until the wife threatens bodily injury to me if I play it one more time LOL.

If I remember my music history correctly, Sibelius initially composed this in either 1898 or 1899 as a series of musical pictures, or tableaus (sp?). The last of these "pictures" was a very patriotic piece called, I believe, Awake Finland, Awaking Finland, Finland Awaking or Finland Awakes (me ol' MusHis instructor must be spinning in his grave!). Anyway, it was in either 1900 or 1901 when this final patriotic piece was spun off on its own.

I believe it took until 1935 to 1937 before Sibelius actually finalized the Finlandia Hymn, and I believe at the end of WWII he did a choral arrangement (1949 or 1950).

Sorry, I'm too lazy to check out the facts this late at night, but seeing it was part of a paper I did in the late '60s as a music major, it kind of stuck with me.

99 posted on 12/05/2001 11:37:46 PM PST by Boomer Geezer
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To: Mike Darancette
Sorry, but any mahler symphonies after the fourth were written after 1900. So my list is: (in no particular order) 1. Brahms German Requiem 2. Liszt Fantasia and Fugue on B-A-C-H 3. Mahler#2 4. Mahler#3 5. Beethoven#5 6. Beethoven#9 7. Bach The Art of Fugue 8. Sibelius#2 9. Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto 10.Wagner Tristan und Isolde You should try some of the newer stuff though too (after 1900) Shostakovich, Stravinsky, Strauss, Hindemith, Bartok, Corigliano, Rouse, Tomasi, Copland, Harris, Lutoslawski, Schoenberg (Gurrelieder-trust me, most people balk at Schoenberg but this is great) Berg, Ewazen, Adams, Vaughn-Williams, I could go on for hours........... I guess I've been lurking for a while, but you finally hit me on a topic I really know.
100 posted on 12/05/2001 11:47:17 PM PST by wozzeck
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