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Need tech advice on abit kt7a raid board

Posted on 12/09/2001 5:24:14 PM PST by damnlimey

I've just been given an abit kt7a raid board along with a 800mhz athlon .
Rather than spend hours or days searching the net for advice I thought I'd throw it
out to the techs at FR first.My questions are:

Is there an appreciable speed advantage to using the raid technology and 2 drives?(stripping?)
What video card should I get?
Are there any heatsink/fan choices that work better than others?(dual fans?)
What type of memory ,I know this board supports pc133 but is it DDR compatible.

Any other advice would be greatly appreciated,
Thanks.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: techindex
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To: Brett66
Be careful on your fan selection

I use a Swiftech 462A. Great CPU cooler!

51 posted on 12/09/2001 7:28:26 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: Scully
About a month! :)
52 posted on 12/09/2001 7:29:00 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
About a month! :)

I'd say you done real good, RA ;) Hehe

53 posted on 12/09/2001 7:30:51 PM PST by Scully
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To: Scully
Felt damn lucky! The did replace it with no hassles at all. The even sent it next day air. :)
54 posted on 12/09/2001 7:33:00 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RiVer19
Thanks again to everyone here,those prices are very
encouraging,a lot less than I was expecting to pay,
I also checked on Ebay I can get a real nice 300W case
for $25-$30 and I already have a spare cdrw and floppy
so it looks like I'm in good shape.
One more thing ,this is a jumperless board,any problems to look forward to there?
55 posted on 12/09/2001 8:13:45 PM PST by damnlimey
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To: damnlimey
Jumperless Motherboards are great. No different from a motherboard with the jumpers. Just that you don't have to twiddle with the little jumpers. You just make the changes in the SETUP program. You know, that's where you hit something like DEL when the system is starting up and it takes you to the setup. Just make whatever changes there. You probably won't have to change a thing considering that this motherboard and CPU combination was working together already for your brother.

$20-$30 case + eBay. Be afraid. Be very afraid.... You'll regret getting a cheapo case I promise you. The best case I've experienced for the money is a $49.99 AMD approved 300w case from TigerDirect. I've installed a bunch of systems with it. It just came down in price. Was $60 a couple of months ago. Check it out on their site. It's very well made with nice strong metal and no rough edges to cut you up (like most cheap cases). Lots of space in it too for adding disks and such. It's a bargin considering the quality. Think hard about saving $20 on a crappy case. You'll kick yourself everytime you have to open it up to change something. Just a thought based on experience....

56 posted on 12/09/2001 8:34:22 PM PST by RiVer19
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To: damnlimey
Oh yeah, didn't see you mention a having a sound card.... Good bargin is a Creative Labs Soundblaster Live Value (OEM) for $29 (@ Shentech.com). Good card that doesn't waste your CPU cycles doing sound stuff (at a great price).
57 posted on 12/09/2001 8:39:17 PM PST by RiVer19
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To: RiVer19
I use Lian Aluminium cases. :) Great case but expensive.
58 posted on 12/09/2001 9:01:26 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RiVer19
I like the value card. Great card! SB has now added the Audigy line. What do you think of them?
59 posted on 12/09/2001 9:03:25 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
You obviously have a nice budget for computers. ha! I've got six systems on my network in my house. My wife and I both are programmers and she works from home. Plus my two kids are both seriously into computers. So, I've got a lot of systems that I have to spread my computer budget over. I buy inexpensive, but quality. There's a nice compromise you can find there if you're careful. There's nothing more frustrating than dealing with just plain "cheap" hardware. It's never worth it. So, I don't do "cheap". Just look for quality at bargin prices...
60 posted on 12/09/2001 9:07:01 PM PST by RiVer19
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To: RiVer19
I wanted to upgrade my video card to the 64MB GeForce2 MX400 card to which you refered. My problem is that it requires AGP 2.0, and my motherboard (ABIT BH6) is only AGP 1.0 compliant. Do you have any ideas on a similar card I can use? Thanks.
61 posted on 12/09/2001 9:07:02 PM PST by tjg
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To: RadioAstronomer
Oh, those Audigy based cards are fantastic. Again, it's a Cadillac of cards (like the GeForce3 in video). Best price I see is a $59 OEM card. Most are $80 and up. So, I weight the need for computer audio excelence .vs. price. I will have to stick with the $29 SB Live card. I don't listen to that much audio on my PC. My home audio system is for that and the DVD player plays mp3 disks. Shoot, in games I don't have time to take in the audio effects really. So, that's not a big deal to me either.
62 posted on 12/09/2001 9:14:57 PM PST by RiVer19
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To: RiVer19
No kids and 17 computers on my network at home. :) I hope I was not coming across as bragging! :(

I also love fine hardware. My main gaming machine is a 1.8Ghz P4/Asus P4-T with 512Megs dual channel RDram 800, 16x DVD, 40x Plextor CDRW, Audigy platinum Sound card with fire wire and optical out, 75Gbyte IBM HD, Hercules Prophet III (Geforce3), Swiftech 462A cooler, Lian case, Enerex 465W PS, LS120 drive, floppy, 2.0 USB, optical mouse, and a 10/100 ethernet card. I Also added rounded IDE cables for greater cooling.

63 posted on 12/09/2001 9:16:01 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
that would do, i got 640 mb for a 700 mhz duron and moves fast.
64 posted on 12/09/2001 9:17:49 PM PST by green team 1999
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To: tjg
Check out the prices of an ASUS C2SL2 MoBo. Not hard to change out and is a fantastic motherboard! Rock stable and will support all PIII processors amd modern vid cards.
65 posted on 12/09/2001 9:19:26 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: green team 1999
i got 640 mb for a 700 mhz duron and moves fast.

Sounds like a great machine! :)

66 posted on 12/09/2001 9:21:20 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: tjg
I think you are out of luck with that AGP 1.0 motherboard. No GeForce2 cards will run on it with any stablity. You'd get a lot of lockups and such from all the user comments on newsgroups about such setups. The best I think you can get would be a TNT2 based card with the 1.0 AGP.

You maybe should consider saving your pennys a bit longer and upgrade your motherboard/CPU combo too. But, then that usually means a new case due to needing a 300w power supply. So, you get into money when you only wanted a better video card.

Stay away from the GeForce2 PCI video cards. They can be had inexpensively. But, the performance is awful on most things from what I've read. The PCI interface would over come your problem, but you'd still be disappointed with the performance. The memory bandwidith is just not enought to feed that chipset on a PCI bus. It's a suckers market card I believe. It's like putting a 4 cylinder engine in a corvette....

67 posted on 12/09/2001 9:26:37 PM PST by RiVer19
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To: RiVer19
Would he have to upgrade the PS and case if he only added an ASUS MoBo and Geforce2 MX? Keep the same processor. Or is that abit MoBo a non ATX compliant board?
68 posted on 12/09/2001 9:33:39 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
Oh, I imagine that motherboard is ATX as almost all are now. That sounds like a fine solution to me. But, it really depends on how fast is the CPU he currently has to determine if it's a smart solution. I mean, I wouldn't do that if he has a 500MHz PIII. I'd go ahead and get a 1.2GHz motherboard/CPU/fan combo for about $150. There are some good combos out there for this price now.

I just wouldn't advise a new motherboard for someone with a processor of less than 800MHz today. Seems like a waste of money for something you won't be happy with in a year. It does depend on what you want to do with the PC. If you are not a power user, that would mean a slower PC would do fine for you longer. But, if you want to play games all bets are off. Nothing pushes PC sales and upgrades like PC game playing.

69 posted on 12/10/2001 3:57:26 AM PST by RiVer19
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To: RiVer19
I afree completely. But money gets tight. You can upgrade the board, then the vid card and finally the CPU. over time its much less painful. :) And the ASUS C2SL2 supports the fastest PIIIs. :)
70 posted on 12/10/2001 4:49:14 AM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RiVer19
Great Post!

How would you answer the same question for someone looking to put together a system to run Photoshop, working with 130 Meg files...i.e. memory type, RAID, video card (2D mainly), ?.

(See )Moonhawk

71 posted on 12/10/2001 5:30:13 AM PST by moonhawk
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To: moonhawk
Memory: You needs lots of memory. That is the main thing when running Photoshop on large files. I'd go with a 512MB minimum. It's cheap now. Maybe get three sticks of 256MB for a total of 768MB. The 512MB sticks are just a little more expensive. But, they do keep you from filling up your slots for memory. I think 512MB would be sufficient for working with graphics files less than 200MB.

RAID: Now, I do RAID systems for the hospitals at work. I design hospital computers for a living. But, those systems host data that peoples LIVES depend on. For a home PC or most business PC's I don't think it's necessary. If you want speedy disks, get something faster than a 5400RPM disk. 7200RPM or 10kRPM is a good choice. Each getting a bit more expensive. But, like I said earlier, the 7200RPM 100MB/sec UATA 40GB disks are just $98 now (for Seagate). And, those are darn quick and a good value. Disk drives are really very dependable these days in general. I've actually NEVER had a hard disk fail on me at home on multiple systems. I really have faith in Seagate drives because of this and it's all I buy for my systems. Just based on experience. I'm sure others with disagree with me. Stay FAR away from IBM drives. Trust me there....I won't get into it. Very bad quality.

Video card: For your application you probably don't need a 64MB video card. I know, I know it seems to defy logic considering the size of the graphics files you are working with. But, the truth is on these video cards most all of that memory is used up for 3D graphics buffering. In a 2D business application it doesn't mean jack. BUT, I would still get the 64MB GeForce2 MX400 card. Why? Well, it's a well supported card, with great looking output, super drivers from nVidia. You can get a Jaton brand card like this for $68 right now (again I shop a lot at Shentech.com - they are just my most recent inexpensive/reliable supplier). Don't use the drivers that come with the card. On any nVidia chipset card just download the nVidia drivers and use theirs. Super controls for brightness, contrast, and gamma right there on the control panel. Color enhancment supplied by the drivers is super - sliding bar that lets you adjust the color saturation. Very nice driver features. So, best card for the money all around to me.

RiVer

72 posted on 12/10/2001 6:44:24 AM PST by RiVer19
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To: moonhawk
Beautiful images by the way...You take those yourself?
73 posted on 12/10/2001 6:46:48 AM PST by RiVer19
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To: RiVer19
Thanks. I recently bought an Envision 17" LCD. Beutiful montior but it doesn't seem comfortable with my current hardware arrangement. (The system hangs more after I intalled it.)

So I thought I'd try a new video card. But that was difficult for the reasons we discussed. So I thought to just build another system. I did my homework and priced out the parts. But I ended up buying a Micron refurbished (they are here in town). I got a P4 2GHz system cheaper than I could buy the parts.

Problem was I got it home and it was so noisy from the 4 fans I couldn't live with it. I went to take it back but they wouldn't accept a return; all refurbished sales are final.

To make a long story short, I gave it to my kids, and I'm back where I started, $1500 poorer, trying to find a video card.

My ABIT MB is maxed out. PIII600, PC100, AGP 1.0. I need to build a new system, but I want a quiet machine and that adds a whole level of complexity to the problem. I've been researching it and will probably start after the holidays.

I was hoping to find a video card to tide me over but it looks like a no go. Thanks for your input.

74 posted on 12/10/2001 7:06:28 AM PST by tjg
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To: RadioAstronomer
I'd have to find a slot 1 MB since that's the processor I have. That's a dead end street.

Of course any computer is a dead end street if you wait long enough. I get one or two upgrages it seems before the whole thing is obsolete, and it's time to start over.

I'm there. This time around I'm going to focus on reducing noise as opposed to blinding speed.

75 posted on 12/10/2001 7:19:50 AM PST by tjg
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To: tjg
I would think you should get the Envision drivers for that monitor. BUT, I checked on those and actually downloaded them and they say this "monitor drivers do not control the number of colors you can display in Windows. They only enable Windows to recognize the maximum resolution and refresh rate of your monitor". And, they are only a .inf file. I don't see how that could cause your system to hang. I would tend to guess something else is going on. The job of those monitor drivers doesn't seem to do much to your system like one with .dll's or loadable drivers. I can't see how they would make the system lockup. But, it does sound like your problem started after adding the monitor. Could be a coincidence though. May want to get the latest drivers for your current video card, sound card and really anything you've got. Usually it's drivers causing this problem. If that fails to stop the lockups, you may want to consider reloading windows. I've been in similar situations and reloading the OS fixed it. I never could figure out what part of the OS was causing the problem so I just reloaded it and the system was then very stable again. Could cost you time, but not money. Good luck.
76 posted on 12/10/2001 7:30:52 AM PST by RiVer19
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To: RiVer19
I did the drivers thing. Both for the monitor and the video card. Didn't do the sound board and the other stuff. I'll try that.

I thought about reistalling windows, but don't I need to reformatt the hard drive and start fresh? Eek.

77 posted on 12/10/2001 7:42:24 AM PST by tjg
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To: tjg
Well, yes you'd need to reformat and start fresh for the best reslults. There's something wrong with your system and most likely it's drivers or some other program that's getting loaded at boot time. The only SURE way to deal with it is to reformat and start over. But, that's not such a bad thing really. I bet you've never heard of "Windows arthritis" have you? It's a condition affecting the Windows OS where over time the system gets slower and slower due to build up of useless crud in the Registry. I promise you if you reload your OS you'll find your system faster. It amazes me every time I see it. But, it's a true fact of this OS. It is the very big payoff to the pain of reloading windows. You end up with a faster more stable computer every time.
78 posted on 12/10/2001 7:50:06 AM PST by RiVer19
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To: Oschisms
BTW, the mirror is for my backup server. I am totally aware that it is the worst config performance wise.

Not necessarily. Mirroring is nominally slower writing, but fastest reading.

79 posted on 12/10/2001 11:44:36 AM PST by peabers
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To: damnlimey
Global Win fans are great, but the FOP38 sounds like a 747 on rollout. I use a Global Win FOP32 with my Athlon 800. With a decent heatsink/fan combo you can easily get 1 Ghz out of your T-bird (10 x 100 Mhz bus).

Just make sure you have a decent power supply. I use AOpen cases with a 250 w PSU, and it runs the overclocked Athlon, 512 M or RAM, three 20 GB HDDs and a CD-RW just fine. However, cheaper PSUs would choke on that. AMD recommends at least a 300 W PSU for normal operation.

80 posted on 12/10/2001 11:52:53 AM PST by peabers
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To: peabers
Thanks,more good solid info,posting to FR has probably saved me days of research,
soooo,one more question .You mentioned overclocking,
which way do you recommend,how difficult is it to do and how reliable has it been for you?
81 posted on 12/10/2001 12:02:30 PM PST by damnlimey
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To: damnlimey
Overclocking your CPU simply means you get it to run faster than it's rated speed. I built my current set up for overclocking. I had a 300Mhz celeron and overclocked it to 500+Mghz. You accomplish this a number of ways including increasing the core voltage and or the speed of the front side bus. Overclocking is also possible on your video card.

It used to be a lot more usefull than it is now. I don't recommend it unless you want to fool around with it for entertainment sake. Or unless, like me, you are a die hard computer-hardware-geek-wannabe. If that's the case, overclocking your CPU is mandatory.

82 posted on 12/10/2001 2:38:20 PM PST by tjg
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To: damnlimey
You mentioned overclocking, which way do you recommend,how difficult is it to do and how reliable has it been for you?

I use Asus mother boards, but the Abits also use what is called jumperless settings. You set the CPU clock and memory bus speeds through the bios. There's several newsgroups and web sites that specialise in how to do it. You can ask board specific questions, and get replies within hours. One such site is Overclockers.Com.

I've overclocked both Pentium and AMD chips, and the AMDs are by far the best performers. You can realise performance gains of 33% quite easily. I've had my T-bird 800 running at 1 GHz rock solid stable for over a year, and a 1 GHz T-bird running at 1.33 GHz for nine months.

The two biggest enemies in overclocking are heat (hence the need for a good heatsink/fan) and flakey cheap memory modules.

Finally, you'll need a good motherboard monitor. Most of the ones that come with the motherboard are inaccurate. MBM, which can be downloaded here, is probably the best. It's also free.

83 posted on 12/10/2001 4:40:11 PM PST by peabers
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To: peabers
Ultimate Gaming Machine :)

Case:
Lian PC-68 with front USB out.

Monitor:
Sony CDP-G520 21”.

Power Supply:
Enermax 468W with two cooling fans.

Motherboard:
ABIT TH7II-RAID (I850 chipset) Dual channel RD-RAM.

CPU:
Pentium-4 2.0GHz Micro PGA (socket 478). (with stock INTEL CPU cooler and fan)

RAM:
Four 512Meg RDRAM-800 memory sticks. (2Gbytes RAM).

Video Card:
Geforce3 Titanium 500.

Sound Card/System:
Sound Blaster Audigy Platinium with both optical and Firewire I/O linked to a DENON Surround sound processor (with optical in) and 5 speakers with an additional subwoofer.

USB Card:
USB 2.0 four port USB card.

SCSI Card:
160 Ultra wide 4 port SCSI card.

Hard Drive:
Two Western Digital WD-1200 7200 rpm 8Meg cache 120Gbyte hard drives. (stripe 0)

DVD:
Pioneer DVD-106S 16X DVD.

CD-RW:
Plextor Plexwriter 24/10/40A.

Floppy Drive / Drive “B”:
Generic 1.44 and an LS-120 (120Mbyte floppy).

Ethernet Card:
Netgear 10/100 ethernet card.

Mouse:
Logitech optical wheel mouse.

Game Pad:
Logitech Wingman Rumble Pad.

Joystick:
Logitech Extreme Digital 3D Joystick.

Keyboard:
Microsoft Natural Keyboard Pro.

84 posted on 12/10/2001 11:32:14 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: tjg
Re noisy fans.

"How to Quiet Down Your Computer"
Matt Sigman - 12/6/01


I recently built a 1.4Ghz Athlon XP based system that I intended to overclock substantially. I purchased a Golden Gate (all copper) with a 26CFM fan. I hoped that this would provide sufficient cooling but still be relatively quiet.

When I started it up the first time, to my disappointment, it sounded like somebody was mowing their lawn in there. Not good! I tried to cover up the sound by placing the computer under the desk, to no avail. So I decided to install a simple potentiometer (also called a variable resistor or rheostat) to limit the speed (and therefore noise) of the CPU fan. It is a simple project and I am extremely pleased at the results. Here is how I did it...

First I needed to calculate what value potentiometer I need to purchase, so I used Ohm's law which states:

Ohms = Volts / Current

I knew that the fan was running at 12v and drawing about 300 milliamps, so by plugging the numbers in (12 / .3) I got 40 ohms. That is the current resistance the fan is experiencing. This now gives us a base to start with. Referring back to Ohm's law, you can see that doubling the resistance halves the current (and therefore speed) of the fan.

My fan was running at about 5700 RPMs and I thought that I should set 2500-3000 RPMs as my target speed. If we used a 50 ohm resistor for example, the highest resistance (which yields the lowest speed) would be 40 + 50 = 90 ohms of total resistance.

We can determine that the current at 90 ohms (The maximum resistance possible) would be 12 / 90 or 113mA. 113mA is only 38% (113mA / 300mA) as much current, so at that setting the fan would be spinning at about 2166 RPM (5700 * .38). And guess what? That speed is perfect because it covers the speed range I wanted but doesn't allow the fan to be completely stopped. That means my new range of adjustability is about 2100 RPM to 5700 RPM, which would allow excellent flexibility and includes my goal of 2500-3000 RPM.

I went out to my local electronics store and bought the 50 ohm linear taper potentiometer as well as a knob (to make it look more professional.)

IMPORTANT: You must purchase one rated at 3 Watts minimum.

Five watts is the best bet, to be safe. Any less and you will fry it, causing it to stop conducting current and thereby stopping your CPU fan entirely. Any potentiometer that is in the 30-70 ohm range would work well too. Don't go higher than 100 ohms though, because that won't provide accurate control and it would be very easy to cut off all power, causing your fan to stop.

There are three tabs on the potentiometer. For our purposes, we will only be using two of them. I spliced into the middle red wire (+12v) from the CPU fan and connected it to one terminal on the potentiometer. I then connected another wire from the center tab of the potentiometer into the wire leading to the motherboard. Here's a diagram to help clarify things:

Diagram

Note: It doesn't matter if you choose reverse the connection, because this isn't a diode so it doesn't care which direction the current is flowing.

Case

Now that the potentiometer has been connected, it needs a nice mounting spot. I chose to mount mine in an easily accessible spot, on the front of the case directly below the power button.

First I removed the front panel to expose the sheet metal up front. Then I drilled a 5/16" mounting hole (specified on the potentiometer packaging) into the sheet metal, making sure I wasn't going to hit anything inside the case!

Next, I put the plastic bezel back on the case and stuck a pencil through the hole and marked on the plastic bezel where I should drill a hole. I took off the panel one last time, then I drilled the hole in the appropriate spot.

Next, I inserted the potentiometer (already connected) and screwed it down. I put the plastic bezel back on, made sure everything fit properly, then I put the knob on the end of the potentiometer and screwed it on. Viola! Done at last!

Test everything out and make sure that it works properly. I installed Motherboard Monitor and set the fan alarm to go off at 1500RPM (in case something fails, I don't want to have a fried processor!)

Here is what the final product looked like:

Finished

The noise difference is incredible! There is no more high-pitched noise and it's probably only half as loud. Interestingly enough, I only noticed a slight increase in temperature. Before the modification the CPU was hovering around 38*C idle, now it's usually around 42*C. Not too bad...definitely a worthwhile trade in my book, and all for under $10.

If you have any questions, feel free to email me.

Matt Sigman

85 posted on 12/11/2001 5:04:10 AM PST by damnlimey
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To: damnlimey
Don't know if this is do-able or helpful with 4 fans but it might be worth a shot
86 posted on 12/11/2001 5:05:30 AM PST by damnlimey
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To: RadioAstronomer
RA,

You bragging bastard!! LOL!

87 posted on 12/11/2001 5:14:28 AM PST by peabers
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To: RiVer19
Thanks for the answers...

And yes, I did take those myself. And more, which I haven't gotten around to posting yet.

Photography is not(yet) an occupation that supports me, but I'm working in that direction. (Maybe by retirement age.)

;^)

88 posted on 12/11/2001 5:24:08 AM PST by moonhawk
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To: peabers
Liked the machine eh! :) LOL!!!!
89 posted on 12/11/2001 5:47:46 AM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: damnlimey
Thanks for the article. I haven't seen that one. I'm going to try this in conjuction with some high quality, panasonic panaflo fans. Might yeild very quiet results.

I noticed in researching this subject that Europeans are a lot more interested in the subject of quite computers than are americans. Swedes in particular. I'm guessing that envirmental regulations have something to do with it.

90 posted on 12/11/2001 8:52:34 AM PST by tjg
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To: RadioAstronomer
I've got the same CD-RW drive as you, but it's been rebadged as an Iomega. I'm having problems with it though. It shipped with Nero 5.5, and when I put a CD-RW in, it locks up. I can write and read, but when I try to eject the CD-RW it reboots Windows 2000 Pro. I have to use Nero's eject function as the button on the drive is rendered useless.

It's definitely a Nero problem, because I installed the software on another workstation with an Acer CD-RW. The eject button on the Acer is likewise rendered useless, but the software eject works.

Did you have any problems with your Plextor?

91 posted on 12/11/2001 2:21:39 PM PST by peabers
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To: damnlimey
I concur with a poster above expressing reservations about cheap cases. But you don't have to overpay. One of the best cases is Inwin A500 which goes for less than $50.

Whenever I build a machine I go the the usual places like Anandtech.com, Tom's Hardware, motherboard.org, and then I also google on say "reviews computer cases" and other components. It's a lot of research work initially, but it really pays off. (Then of course you get to experience all those disappointments when you can't find anybody locally selling your first choice of a component.)

92 posted on 12/11/2001 2:36:48 PM PST by Revolting cat!
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To: peabers
I gave up on Nero, I now use easy CD creator. Works great! :)
93 posted on 12/11/2001 4:30:06 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
I have always used Easy CD Creator and Direct CD with minimal fuss (there was a minor issue with Win2K that was patched). It's just that some of the pinheads in the cdrom usenet groups are always raving about Nero.

The only problem with my older version of ECDC is it probably won't support 24 x write. The new version has some major issues in Win2K.

94 posted on 12/11/2001 5:02:11 PM PST by peabers
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To: peabers
It gets real frustrating to get everything working together like it should. I personaly found Nero to be user unfriendly and I trashed it, no matter what the news groupies say. :) As far as greater than 24x, there should be drivers that fix that on the web. I will look into it and freep you with what I find out. I have not even thought of porting over to Xp yet.
95 posted on 12/11/2001 5:11:45 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
I'm sticking with Win2K for the time being. I won't consider XP until SP1 is released.
96 posted on 12/11/2001 5:34:05 PM PST by peabers
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To: peabers
Amen to that!! :)
97 posted on 12/11/2001 6:12:02 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
I'm sticking with Win2K for the time being. I won't consider XP until SP1 is released.

It's here

98 posted on 12/13/2001 2:06:25 PM PST by peabers
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To: peabers
Thanks!!!
99 posted on 12/13/2001 2:43:12 PM PST by RadioAstronomer
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To: RadioAstronomer
Thanks to all who gave advice and offered suggestions on building my new computer,
I had very few problems,all easily solved, mainly by visiting links suggested by freeper techies.
I am now up and running on my new pooter and compared to the old one it screams
(800 Athlon and a gig of ram compared to 200 pII 48 megs of ram.)
I'm a very happy Freeper,thanks again and I would strongly suggest building your own to anyone who's never tried it
100 posted on 02/02/2002 5:37:42 PM PST by damnlimey
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