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American Journalism and the Constitution (Tony Snow)
Imprimus | December 2001 | Tony Snow

Posted on 12/11/2001 2:09:00 AM PST by leadpenny

American Journalism and the Constitution

Tony Snow
December 2001 Imprimis

Tony Snow was born in Kentucky and raised in Cincinnati. He received his bachelor's degree in philosophy from Davidson College in 1977, and went on to study philosophy and economics at the University of Chicago. He began his journalism career in 1979 as an editorial writer for the North Carolina Greensboro Record, later becoming an editorial writer at The Virginian Pilot in Norfolk, Virginia, editorial page director of The Daily Press in Newport News, deputy editorial page editor of The Detroit News, and editorial page director of The Washington Times. In 1991, he took a sabbatical form journalism to work as President Bush's speechwriter and deputy assistant for media affairs, later becoming a nationally syndicated columnist with The Detroit News and USA Today. He was named host of Fox News Sunday in April 1996, and serves also as political analyst for FOX News Channel. Mr. Snow and his wife Jill have three children and live in Virginia. Send this article to a friend

The following is adapted from Mr. Snow's speech at a Hillsdale College seminar on October 15, 2001, in Scottsdale, Arizona.

All Americans have a deep interest in maintaining the Constitution. This might seem especially true of journalists, who owe their livelihoods to the founding document that frames our freedoms. Yet for some reason, American journalists in recent decades have assailed that document with startling vigor - and have seemed blissfully ignorant of their treachery. Fortunately, the Constitution itself supplies a cure for this malady.

Four Pillars of Pluralism

Before I consider how and why the Constitution does this, consider a few of the fundamental ways in which it safeguards liberty. One is its guarantee of free speech and a free press. We have seldom given the latter much thought, because from the earliest days of our nation until relatively recently, Americans have venerated the Fourth Estate. Thomas Jefferson, for one, famously favored a free press, even though he was the target of colorful and scurrilous fusillades from a dazzling array of journalistic foes. He regarded open public debate, facilitated by the freedoms of speech and press, to be indispensable for the growth and health of the then-fragile American republic.

Rigorous public debate contributes to constitutional democracy in several ways. It subjects ideas to the discipline of competition and creates a general appetite for truth - or at least for facts. Just as communist systems were built upon the careful and deliberate use of lies, the American system rests on an unquenchable quest for truth. Public debate is important also to maintaining public trust. Finally, this debate serves as a vehicle in forming a consensus regarding fundamental issues of right and wrong.

This concept of a moral consensus as an end or purpose of free expression reminds us that America's Founders envisioned a "republic of virtue." In his Farewell Address, George Washington called morality "a necessary spring of popular government." James Madison observed in Federalist 55 that citizen virtue is more important in republican regimes, where the people rule, than in non-popular forms of government. Furthermore, the Founders connected this idea of virtue with religion. Even Thomas Jefferson, a fabled Deist, asked in his Notes on the State of Virginia: "Can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God?" And of course the Declaration of Independence itself was based on natural law doctrine: " … all men are … endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights…."

Another crucial safeguard to liberty is free enterprise, based on the right to property. The first generations of Americans planted the seeds of what Alexander Hamilton called a "commercial republic," combining civil liberty with a relatively unrestrained economy. Each citizen would have the opportunity to become a pauper or a tycoon, depending on his ambition, resourcefulness and luck. Capitalism provided the definitive solution to class resentment: If you didn't like being poor, you could strive to become rich. No society enjoys greater social mobility than ours, and none has proved as inhospitable to the fashionable envy that hamstrings European economies to this day.

Inseparable from the rights underlying capitalism is the principle of limited government. If the Founders understood one thing, it was human nature. In framing the Constitution, they showed an appreciation for innate human weaknesses and took into account man's tendencies toward ambition and avarice. The Federalist Papers abound in observations on this topic. Federalist 51, for instance, in explaining the division of government into three branches - one of several methods employed in the Constitution to keep the government from overreaching - notes:

It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary.

Free expression, virtue, capitalism and limited government were four of the main pillars that upheld America through its first two centuries. One word summarizes the system of stable liberty that they combined to form: pluralism. We Americans don't like unusual concentrations of authority. Yet here we return to a source of wonder: America's journalistic establishment, which owes its existence and authority to the Constitution, fails to appreciate the Constitution's intellectual architecture. Indeed, that establishment has mounted a sustained assault on each of the pillars of the American system I have just discussed.

Stepford Journalism

Begin with the most obvious: free expression. The media today hate it. Several years ago, the Los Angeles Times distributed to employees a 22-page list of banned words, including "fireman." The idea was to craft a language that would not offend people inclined to bristle with rage at the existence of such things as noun gender. Political correctness, enforced under the auspices of "diversity," has tarred and feathered just about anybody interested in exploring such issues as race or homosexuality, despite the fact that these remain hot topics among the public. At times, the press - which considers itself not just a tribune of history but also the protector of the Mother Tongue (if one can use such a term) - has blacklisted words without regard to their provenance or etymology. The mere sound sometimes serves as sufficient pretext for prohibition. A recent controversy over the word "niggardly" comes to mind.

More recently, a trend called "public journalism" has risen to lobotomize news reporting. Newspapers convene citizen panels, conduct polls, and seek the advice of political activists in the hope of becoming "representative" or "responsive." These consultations invariably turn papers into reactive, inchoate, unreadable mush. One of the most assiduously avoided topics in today's media is religion. The Founders' public piety stands in stark contrast to the muffled guffaws of journalists that greeted candidate George W. Bush during the campaign of 2000, when he named Jesus as his "favorite philosopher." The contemporary press may not loathe religion, but it regards it with extreme suspicion - and discourages unbridled discourse on important moral topics by appending labels ("religious right," "right-wing," "extremist" and "intolerant" are among the favorites) to religious orders or organizations that hold strong moral views.

As for capitalism, one can count on one finger the number of major newspapers that share Hamilton's enthusiasm for commerce. Not too many years ago, the elite media openly treated socialism with respect and even deference, while scoffing at American-style capitalism. Think of the furor that arose when Ronald Reagan declared the Soviet Union an "evil empire." Pundits predicted global conflagration as a result of the Gipper's explosion of candor. (Of course, Reagan was right!)

Socialism enjoyed cachet because the press had come to view limited government as a menace rather than a safeguard. Few mainstream press organs share Madison's apprehension in Federalist 48 about the government "everywhere extending the sphere of its activities and drawing all power into its impetuous vortex." (Note: Madison in this passage was referring specifically to Congress.) Journalists consider tax revenues a secular tithe and measure virtue in terms of government outlays. When a president says he wants to attack some problem or other, the first question from reporters inevitably is: "How much are you going to spend?" - not, "What can we do?"

These generalizations hold true primarily because the media, for a very long time, had ceased to operate pluralistically. A handful of companies controlled American journalism between the 1950s and the 1990s. The old "big three" - ABC, CBS and NBC - dominated television, and a small coterie of newspapers - principally, the New York Times and the Washington Post - set the tone and standard for daily news coverage. As a consequence, the American press became a homogeneous blob and reporters displayed a depressing uniformity of views on moral and political issues. A 1993 Roper survey showed that 93 percent of all Washington-based political reporters voted for Bill Clinton in 1992. (A similar percentage did the same four years later). Other polls show that journalists embrace predictably liberal views on such hot-button topics as gun control, abortion, taxes, school choice, racial preferences and national defense, and that the profession is far to the left of the electorate on virtually every key contemporary issue.

One can attribute this Stepford-like uniformity in part to a political peculiarity. Between 1932 and 1994, Republicans were all but irrelevant in official Washington. Democrats dominated Congress and its machinery, and reporters naturally migrated toward those staffers who ran the capital's bureaucracies. Since the key sources remained the same, year after year, journalists formed ties of friendship, ideology and even kinship with Democrats - and came to view Republicans as exotic mutants. On the day after the 1994 election, a prominent political reporter in Washington called on me to provide introductions to some Republicans. Said the writer, "I don't know any."

The Silly Myth of Objectivity

The American press wasn't always so homogeneous and dull. In prior generations, newspapers were notorious for their variety and passion. They declared full-throated allegiance to political parties - hence such names as the Tallahassee Democrat and the Waterbury Republican - and spilled ink as blood on a battlefield, a token of unshakeable convictions. So what happened? First, journalists decided to pursue the Holy Grail of "objectivity." They not only avoided making political statements; they pretended to have no political views at all. This whole enterprise was and is silly. God, the source of all fact and truth, is objective. But journalists, who often know very little, are not. H.L. Mencken captured this quandary when he observed that the average reporter's mind is "a mass of puerilities and trivialities; to recite them would make even a barber beg for mercy." People who chase stories on deadlines simply cannot gather up every important fact or datum. Sources may fail to return calls; eyewitnesses may render confused or incomplete accounts. In laying claim to objectivity, writers and broadcasters submit themselves to an impossible standard and open themselves to public scorn.

The profession of journalism also experienced a dramatic cultural change during the latter half of the 20th century. From its inception until the 1960s, journalism operated like a guild. Apprentices began their careers as copy boys, made their way through a succession of newsroom jobs, and graduated, in time, to become reporters or editors. Along the way, they acquired important tools of the trade - experience, skepticism, and an informed humility about what they could and could not do. That tradition came a cropper sometime between the Second World War and Watergate. Journalists began to fancy themselves more as professionals - akin to doctors and lawyers - or as intellectuals. Media organizations sought out and promoted young graduates of elite educational institutions and set them loose without any of the basic training that earlier generations took for granted. In addition, reporters began to view themselves as crusaders rather than eyewitnesses. They set out to change the world rather than to describe it. This combination of factors produced a press corps too often afflicted with the odd combination of callowness, callousness, cluelessness and arrogance.

As the intelligentsia turned sharply leftward in the 1960s, so did the press. Scribes adopted the world-weary Cyril Connolly indolence that had become all the rage in college faculty lounges. Patriotism became deeply unfashionable. So did optimism. The things that made Americans proud had the opposite effect on media stars, who found the old-fashioned customs embarrassing. This mindset has led lately to some moments of high comedy. CNN for a long time refused to call Usama bin Laden a "terrorist." ABC News President David Westin, an attorney by training, ordered his charges not to wear flag pins because to do so would constitute "taking sides" in the war against terror. Westin further embarrassed his company when he told students at the Columbia University School of Journalism that his standard of objectivity forbade his rendering judgment on the propriety of flying an occupied jet into the Pentagon. This would explain why the press, once seen as the voice of the Common Man, now has become his nemesis - and why polls continue to rate journalists just above felons in terms of public approval.

Better Days Ahead

Fortunately, the Constitution - the forgotten document in the journalism biz - has come to the rescue. Court decisions have chipped away at old media monopolies, and now a profusion of new media has risen to supply facts and points of view the old elite brazenly ignored. Talk radio, the Internet and cable television have shattered the "mainstream" media's grip on the distribution of facts and ideas. Rush Limbaugh became the most successful radio personality of his generation, not just because of his great gifts as a broadcaster, but also because he was saying things people couldn't hear elsewhere. The Internet also has become a public square for conservatives. One can find dozens of Web sites devoted to supplying points of view still absent from ABC, CBS, CNN, NBC and NPR. Many of these sites are livelier, smarter and more informative than the old media they hope to supplant. The Constitution's protections of free speech - reiterated in dozens of Supreme Court decisions over the years - have given protective cover to a new pluralism that bids to reinvigorate the business of journalism and sharpen public discourse.

The great and fitting irony is that the modern media establishment, in reviling America's constitutional principles and established institutions, broke its traditional links to the public, creating a market for its successor and bringing forth a tantalizing prospect: a full-fledged revival of the free, open, and spirited public debate, facilitated by a free and pluralistic press, that Americans took for granted throughout most of our nation's history.

"Reprinted by permission from IMPRIMIS, the national speech digest of Hillsdale College (www.hillsdale.edu)."


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Editorial; Front Page News
KEYWORDS: tonysnow
Imprimus

Chow down, FReepers. This is good stuff.

1 posted on 12/11/2001 2:09:00 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: leadpenny
This is better written than the comments I have made over the last seven years, but the hypothesis is essentially the same. I lean a little bit more toward the government, through the nationalization of the air waves, licensing of broadcast stations, and censorship during world war II, caused the cartelization of the media.
2 posted on 12/11/2001 3:07:57 AM PST by marktwain
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To: leadpenny; OLDWORD
Anyone who is a "journalist" or who aspires to be a "journalist," should read and reflect on this commentary. Tony Snow does his homework. And that is the first role of any journalist.

Reaching into one's own mind for answers and solutions, in total ignorance of the history of the nation and the history of a free press, produces nothing but trach and twaddle. That's why most of the talking heads on TV, and typing heads in the print media are worse than useless, They are an active danger to the survival of the Republic.

Congressman Billybob

3 posted on 12/11/2001 5:09:01 AM PST by Congressman Billybob
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To: leadpenny
Great Stuff!!
"Many of these sites are livelier, smarter and more informative
than the old media they hope to supplant."

Think he was talking about us??? Go Tony!!

4 posted on 12/11/2001 5:33:17 AM PST by Bush_Democrat
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To: leadpenny
Well Tony, I do like the article, but I'm afraid that it's back to square one. With the passage of the Patriot Act it is no longer feasible to offer open, honest discourse, lest one be charged with trying to change government policy through dialogue.
Sorry old friend, as much as I would like to think that there is a new medium out there, it too is being slowly eroded. I believe more and more independent writers will fall out because they do not wish to have their liberties curtailed.
Stepping out on a limb these days can serve up more than a few bruises and having the wind knocked out of you from the fall.
5 posted on 12/11/2001 5:36:22 AM PST by philman_36
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To: leadpenny
bump
6 posted on 12/11/2001 8:59:04 AM PST by Libertarianize the GOP
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To: Bush_Democrat
Think he was talking about us???

If he wasn't - he should've been. That was the line I liked too.

One can find dozens of Web sites devoted to supplying points of view still absent from ABC, CBS, CNN, NBC and NPR.

BTW, do you think he was getting in a not so subtle plug for FOX? Way to go Tony.

7 posted on 12/11/2001 9:31:10 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: leadpenny
Loved the article! Tony's great- he is one of the best conservative thinkers in America. The feeling he has that there will eventually be alternative forums to the "big three monopoly" in which conservative voices will be allowed to be heard is absolutely right- we're speaking on one of them now. I know it's mean to say, but I can't wait for Rush to take a day off or go on vacation, so that Tony can sit in as guest host. Good article ( or speech)- whatever!
8 posted on 12/12/2001 9:15:44 PM PST by conservativesoutherner
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To: conservativesoutherner
...- we're speaking on one of them now.

Bump your comments. Sometimes I think back to a few years ago before I was connected and couldn't sleep - like now. I remember thinking it was 'cool' that the networks had put up all-night programming like ABC News Now with Aaron Brown, and how far the world had come from signing off with the National Anthem and going to test patterns. Wow, were we ever getting the latest stuff. Not.

As for Rush, I can take him or leave him. If I'm in the car I try to catch him (unless there is something more interesting on C-SPAN Radio). I wouldn't want to sound like I was trying to push Rush out the door, but it would be an interesting thread theme to see who FReepers thought should replace him. Probably has been done. I have no preference, however, Snow and Hannity would love to have the Golden Microphone, I'm sure.

One other thing, I see I have to learn to spell IMPRIMIS. (and a lot of other words)

9 posted on 12/13/2001 12:10:30 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: leadpenny
I have to ask a silly question, because i'm kind of new at this. I understand many of the freeperisms & abbreviated words that I see, but there are a couple whose definitions I keep forgetting. What does it mean to "bump" someone's comments or an author's article? Is it a good thing or a way of saying that you disagree with somebody? Also, what does "ping" mean- i've always assumed that it was a way of expressing dislike for something you've just read? Could you help me out here? When you "bumped" my comments, were you agreeing or diagreeing with me? I pray that my asking this does not make me look like a moron in your eyes.

As far as Rush is concerned, I hope I didn't come off as being anti-Rush -- i'm not. I still think he is the (well-deserved) king of talk radio and I generally listen to him whenever I get a chance. But, it can be a little tiring listening to only one man, and besides a little variety doesn't hurt anyone (we need to support more conservatives than just Limbaugh). Sometimes I enjoy hearing other intelligent and witty conservatives, like Tony Snow or Brit Hume, pounding tables and standing for what's right and true. It makes conservatism more fun (to me).

That's why I always look forward to Snow guest-hosting --he's great. Limbaugh is a good conservative, but he tends to focus on smaller government issues entirely, and doesn't spend much of his energy on discussions about society and family. Tony, on the other hand, is a good conservative across the board (both economically and socially- which I appreciate because i'm an economic conservative and I believe in conservative virtues as well). I think Tony is at his best when he discusses moral concerns like society, culture and family; and his beliefs in God and the right to life.

As far as Sean Hannity is concerned, he won't be guest- hosting anymore because he has his own "national" show now (which is fine by me because i've never been fond of Hannity- he's has too many overbearing qualities and he doesn't know how to make good conservative arguments). I hope that Rush will replace Hannity with Brit Hume- he's fabulous!!!

I agree entirely with your sentiments about the "big three networks"- in short- they suck ('big time', as Dick Cheney would say)! And, yes, I caught the misspelling of IMPRIMIS. I wanted to check out the website to see all the lectures they had to offer, so I typed in IMPRIMUS- to no avail. I finally figured out I must be spelling it wrong. But don't worry, I would have made the same mistake as you(in fact- I did)!

10 posted on 12/13/2001 11:46:56 PM PST by conservativesoutherner
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To: conservativesoutherner
A Bump and Ping to ya. Sorry.

Bump is a way for someone to agree with your comments and/or put the thread at the top of the forum. Ping is to alert you to that thread in case you haven't seen it. A ping bumps a thread but a bump is not a ping. Some FReepers have very large Ping lists. BTW, IMO, there are no stupid questions on FR. If you go to my profile page you'll see a couple of threads that are bookmarked: HTML Sandbox, etc. I never read 'em.

11 posted on 12/14/2001 12:07:04 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: leadpenny
bump
12 posted on 12/14/2001 7:33:27 PM PST by MitchellC
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To: MitchellC;All
ReBump.
BTW, if anyone is interested, the IMPRIMIS Archives has a collection of some excellent speeches dating back to 1994.
13 posted on 12/15/2001 2:57:29 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: leadpenny
"All Americans have a deep interest in maintaining the Constitution. This might seem especially true of journalists, who owe their livelihoods to the founding document that frames our freedoms. Yet for some reason, American journalists in recent decades have assailed that document with startling vigor - and have seemed blissfully ignorant of their treachery. Fortunately, the Constitution itself supplies a cure for this malady.

...Before I consider how and why the Constitution does this, consider a few of the fundamental ways in which it safeguards liberty...

...Free expression, virtue, capitalism and limited government were four of the main pillars that upheld America through its first two centuries.

...Yet here we return to a source of wonder: America's journalistic establishment, which owes its existence and authority to the Constitution, fails to appreciate the Constitution's intellectual architecture. Indeed, that establishment has mounted a sustained assault on each of the pillars of the American system I have just discussed.

Wow. I just read this in my copy of IMPRIMIS, and was VERY impressed with the writing of Tony Snow.

I always thought that he was a "lightweight" when he guest-hosted for Rush, but it appears that I was WRONG.

This article is GREAT!

14 posted on 12/31/2001 12:57:23 PM PST by RonDog
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To: doug from upland; ALOHA RONNIE; DLfromthedesert; PatiPie; flamefront; onyx; SMEDLEYBUTLER; Irma...
"Fortunately, the Constitution - the forgotten document in the journalism biz - has come to the rescue. Court decisions have chipped away at old media monopolies, and now a profusion of new media has risen to supply facts and points of view the old elite brazenly ignored. Talk radio, the Internet and cable television have shattered the "mainstream" media's grip on the distribution of facts and ideas...

...The great and fitting irony is that the modern media establishment, in reviling America's constitutional principles and established institutions, broke its traditional links to the public, creating a market for its successor and bringing forth a tantalizing prospect: a full-fledged revival of the free, open, and spirited public debate, facilitated by a free and pluralistic press, that Americans took for granted throughout most of our nation's history."

Bravo, Tony Snow!

.

If you listen to Hugh Hewitt, or read his WND commentaries,
this PING list is for YOU!

Please post your comments, and BUMP!

(If you want OFF - or ON - my "Hugh Hewitt PING list" - please let me know.)

15 posted on 12/31/2001 1:10:02 PM PST by RonDog
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To: RonDog
Socialism enjoyed cachet because the press had come to view limited government as a menace rather than a safeguard. Few mainstream press organs share Madison's apprehension in Federalist 48 about the government "everywhere extending the sphere of its activities and drawing all power into its impetuous vortex." (Note: Madison in this passage was referring specifically to Congress.) Journalists consider tax revenues a secular tithe and measure virtue in terms of government outlays. When a president says he wants to attack some problem or other, the first question from reporters inevitably is: "How much are you going to spend?" - not, "What can we do?"

Agree. Great article. Thanks for the flag, Ron.

16 posted on 12/31/2001 1:56:21 PM PST by Victoria Delsoul
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To: Howlin;Miss Marple;Irma;PhiKapMom
Tony nails it with this one!
17 posted on 12/31/2001 1:56:22 PM PST by Dog
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To: leadpenny; RonDog
Thanks BUMP!
18 posted on 12/31/2001 2:03:22 PM PST by MeekOneGOP
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To: leadpenny
Too bad Snow didn't bother to explore why some Americans don't share his passion for very small gubmint. It seems to me somewhat pointless to contrast 1787 to 2001, while ignoring the things that happened in between.
19 posted on 12/31/2001 2:05:12 PM PST by Huck
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To: Huck
I think Tony needs to do more of this kind of writing
at which he is excellent and a whole lot less of the
TV anchoring at which he is wasting his talent
and he is not nearly as strong.

I like Britt Hume and John Bishop
there in front of the TV camera!

20 posted on 12/31/2001 3:47:30 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: leadpenny
"One can attribute this Stepford-like uniformity in part to a political peculiarity. Between 1932 and 1994, Republicans were all but irrelevant in official Washington. Democrats dominated Congress and its machinery, and reporters naturally migrated toward those staffers who ran the capital's bureaucracies. Since the key sources remained the same, year after year, journalists formed ties of friendship, ideology and even kinship with Democrats - "

I've tried so many times to say this clearly.

Bookmarked thread!

21 posted on 12/31/2001 3:55:18 PM PST by mrsmith
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To: leadpenny
Thanks for this thread. Tony Snow is one of my favorite conservatives on the radio and on FoxNews!

Tony had these really important remarks in this thread:

Better Days Ahead

Fortunately, the Constitution - the forgotten document in the journalism biz - has come to the rescue. Court decisions have chipped away at old media monopolies, and now a profusion of new media has risen to supply facts and points of view the old elite brazenly ignored. Talk radio, the Internet and cable television have shattered the "mainstream" media's grip on the distribution of facts and ideas. Rush Limbaugh became the most successful radio personality of his generation, not just because of his great gifts as a broadcaster, but also because he was saying things people couldn't hear elsewhere. The Internet also has become a public square for conservatives. One can find dozens of Web sites devoted to supplying points of view still absent from ABC, CBS, CNN, NBC and NPR. Many of these sites are livelier, smarter and more informative than the old media they hope to supplant. The Constitution's protections of free speech - reiterated in dozens of Supreme Court decisions over the years - have given protective cover to a new pluralism that bids to reinvigorate the business of journalism and sharpen public discourse.

The great and fitting irony is that the modern media establishment, in reviling America's constitutional principles and established institutions, broke its traditional links to the public, creating a market for its successor and bringing forth a tantalizing prospect: a full-fledged revival of the free, open, and spirited public debate, facilitated by a free and pluralistic press, that Americans took for granted throughout most of our nation's history.

Since we still have freedom of choice thanks to our capitalist society, something else happened here.

For a comparison go back to our American Auto industry in the late 1960's and most of the 1970's. The American Auto Industry became arrogant and the union workers became arrogant and forgot their pride of workmanship. This combination resulted in terrible cars. Cars that weren't safe, that were shoddy made and expensive to keep running.

The auto industry like the arrogant left wing maggots who control our media did not listen to our complaints about their terrible products.

Then, Japan enters our Auto Market with reliable and great little cars. These Japanese cars became even more reliable and bigger while our Auto makers and their unions became more arrogant and refused to listen to us!

One day they woke and started the long turn around to building quality cars with good workmanship and a reliable product.

The maggots who own and control the media will either wake up and offer a better product or they will disappear in this decade! We have choices like we did when Japan entered our auto market. We have the internet and Free Republic. We have Rush, Sean, and the conservative people on Fox News for our news choices. Many of us never go over to the Dark Side mediot maggots any more! They have lost us as audience members, and their advertisers have lost our buying power!

Personally, I hope that they don't wake up as payback for what they have done to this country with their politicians like the Clintoons, the Kennedys, the Gorons, the Da$$hole and ___________ (you fill in the blank)! Their anti America and anti Church and pro radical homosexual agendas in my view puts them in a non salvageable domain!

The day that most Conservatives stop buying newspapers and watching left wing mediots on tv, they will lose even more audiences and power!

Regardless the surviving left wing fishwraps and CNNCBSNBCABCCSPAN are probably like the Dinosaurs who survived the first part of the ice age, only to become petroleum later on! I believe that they picked the wrong side and have doomed themselves. Their side/audience will not even be able to read, listen to a talk show or watch a news show and understand anything by the time this decade is over. That can be blamed on these left wing mediots and what they have done with our school and university systems with the diversity/perversity and PC focus!

22 posted on 12/31/2001 3:56:12 PM PST by Grampa Dave
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To: RonDog
Thanks for the ping. Please keep me on your ping list ;-)

Happy New Year!

23 posted on 12/31/2001 4:32:21 PM PST by WIMom
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To: BADJOE
Read this great Tony Snow article!
24 posted on 12/31/2001 5:02:48 PM PST by WillaJohns
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To: Huck
Too bad Snow didn't bother to explore why some Americans don't share his passion for very small gubmint. It seems to me somewhat pointless to contrast 1787 to 2001, while ignoring the things that happened in between.

I don't understand your comment.
Do you mean the speech he didn't make?
What speech should he have given?

25 posted on 01/01/2002 3:33:08 AM PST by leadpenny
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To: All
Bump.
26 posted on 01/01/2002 8:34:01 AM PST by mrsmith
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To: leadpenny
Bump for responsible, professional journalism.
27 posted on 01/02/2002 11:23:21 AM PST by TigerTale
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To: Grampa Dave
"...for what they have done to this country ..."

In a nutshell, what they have been incrementally doing to this country over the better part of 60 + years, is emasculate it.

This gradual feminization (emasculation) of America, and our great institutions, has resulted in making us weak and vulnerable to attack on many fronts (physically, and spiritually).

The attack on 9-11-01 was merely a 2x4 between the eyes wake-up call, since all previous smaller-scale (physical and spiritual) wake-up calls had been ignored.

Will more 2x4's be *needed* before the slow learner/ sheeple recognize just exactly HOW the DemocRAT/RINO/Marxist/Socialists have been weakening America and making us vulnerable?

When the emasculators in the government-run schools teach the sheeple's children that 2+2 doesn't *logically* have to equal 4, and the sheeple parents go along with it .... who will be naive enough to believe that the sheeple will get the right answer to 2+2 before the next 2x4 hits them?:D

28 posted on 01/02/2002 3:18:54 PM PST by Matchett-PI
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To: leadpenny; Old Glory; Luke FReeman; All
".....but it would be an interesting thread theme to see who FReepers thought should replace [Rush]."

Rush is "one of a kind". Another conservative voice, like Tony Snow, could quite competently, and eloquently sit in for him at the EIB microphone (and has, many times in the past), but no one could ever replace Rush, or his well-deserved #1 place in broadcast history.

There are none who have ever come close to attracting and consistently holding, the vast audience that he has held for over 12 consecutive years. An audience for which advertisers wet their pants.

Rush was the Conservative AM Talk-Radio pioneer who had the courage to "take all the arrows", and by so doing, paved the way for all the other conservative talk show hosts on radio and TV today.

It makes me laugh to hear some formerly avid listeners ---(the ones whose "liberal" eyes he is responsible for opening --- and uninformed minds he's responsible for educating into what constitutes conservatism) --- now saying that he "bores them".

As if what he is doing is all about "them" and the subjects "they think" he should talk about.

Those who advertise on his show to reach the consistently biggest radio audience in history, would say: "Give me a break!!!"

The fact is, that he doesn't want to "preach to the choir". Did you get that??? "The choir" already knows most of the stuff he "teaches". He teaches it so that "the choir" can go out and teach others.

He wants to reach people who don't yet know that stuff. It's new to them. Isn't that what we want???? We want the sheeple to become informed, don't we???

And before I post this on the thread, I want to mention this little FACT: Rush only talks about the stuff that interests HIM. He doesn't care about what you or anyone else wants him to talk about.

Those capable of critical thought can add and get this right answer: 2 (The biggest radio audience in history) + 2 (The highest advertising dollars) = 4 (People are more interested in the stuff Rush is talking about than any other talk show host. Surely</> he must be doing something right --- wouldn't you say?

It serves no good purpose to denigrate any of the conservative/libertarian voices out there in the media. We need all we can get. God bless their efforts.

I can't wait for Rush to get back into that "Attilla The Hun Chair" behind the "Golden EIB Microphone" tomorrow!!

RUSH RULES!!! BTTT

29 posted on 01/02/2002 4:24:51 PM PST by Matchett-PI
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To: conservativesoutherner
"I can't wait for Rush to take a day off or go on vacation, so that Tony can sit in as guest host. Good article ( or speech)- whatever!"

It sure was a good speech! Tony would tell you that every one of the points he made are the same ones Rush has been hammering away at for over 12 years. Maybe you missed them?

30 posted on 01/02/2002 6:10:15 PM PST by Matchett-PI
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To: Matchett-PI
Hello anonymous computer guy,

Don't misunderstand me, I agree with you about Rush! My point was not that I don't want to listen to him anymore- I just want a break now and then. No insult intended to the MIGHTY ONE, but everybody needs a vacation! Ya know?

Responding out of sheer boredom,
Shannon (BTW- is Magnum PI any relation????)

31 posted on 01/05/2002 5:20:33 PM PST by conservativesoutherner
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To: Matchett-PI
Hello anonymous computer guy,

Don't misunderstand me, I agree with you about Rush! My point was not that I don't want to listen to him anymore- I just want a break now and then. No insult intended to the MIGHTY ONE, but everybody needs a vacation! Ya know?

Responding out of sheer boredom,
Shannon (BTW- is Magnum PI any relation????)

32 posted on 01/05/2002 5:21:22 PM PST by conservativesoutherner
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To: conservativesoutherner
"(BTW- is Magnum PI any relation????)"

According to some of my friends. :D

But don't forget! "P I" can also stand alone as "politically incorrect". It can also stand for "politically incorrect private investigator". Ya never know! :D

You're off the hook with me regarding Rush ... except I can't understand anyone wanting to take a "vacation" from his wit and wisdom. Now I can understand someone wanting to supplement it from time to time, however.

33 posted on 01/06/2002 10:54:57 AM PST by Matchett-PI
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To: Matchett-PI
I just have trouble deciding which conservative genius I like better at any given moment- Limbaugh, Snow or Brit Hume. I wish I could combine all three and listen to them nonstop 24-7. But I can't- ARRRGGGHHHHH- decisions, decisions!!!!!!! So, I have to alternate!

Shannon

34 posted on 01/08/2002 7:09:09 PM PST by conservativesoutherner
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To: leadpenny; Blue Highway
bump
35 posted on 03/09/2004 7:50:28 PM PST by perfect stranger ("Don't shoot I'm Che! I'm worth more to you alive than dead!" Che Guevara October 1967)
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To: Blue Highway
bump
36 posted on 03/09/2004 8:04:32 PM PST by perfect stranger ("Don't shoot I'm Che! I'm worth more to you alive than dead!" Che Guevara October 1967)
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Congrats!


37 posted on 04/26/2006 6:58:12 PM PDT by mrsmith
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To: mrsmith

bump worthy


38 posted on 04/27/2006 5:23:49 AM PDT by Dutchgirl (.Jeg er en dansker (I am a Dane.))
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