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Quantum Teleportation and Computation

Posted on 12/20/2001 5:17:16 AM PST by Father Wu

Teleportation is a name given by science fiction writers to a procedure in which an object disappears in one place and reappears in another instantaneously (this is classic teleportation; some authors explore the possibility that the original object doesn't disappear, resulting in there being two sets of the same thing). A good analogy of how a teleporter works is that it works like a 3-D fax machine.

For a long time scientists thought that teleportation was impossible because it violated one of the basic laws of quantum mechanics (Quantum mechanics is a discipline that describes the structure of the atom and how the particles in and around an atom move and react with each other. It also explains how atoms absorb and give off electromagnetic energy. It explains that when an atom releases light energy it doesn't release it in a steady flow. Instead it releases it in bundles of energy called quanta.), called the Heisenburg Uncertainty Principle (I'll talk about this later), which says that you can never exactly copy something. Then, in 1998, an international group, made up of six scientists and centered at the University of Innsbruck, proved that classical teleportation was possible, but at the moment only possible for photons and electrons. We won't be able to teleport ourselves in the near future, but it is not impossible that one day we might be able to.

Werner Heisenburg was a great German physicist who is best remembered for his contributions to quantum theory. He was born on December 5, 1901 in Wuzburg, Germany. He studied under Arnold Sommerfeld and earned his doctorate in 1923. For three after this he worked with Niels Bohr in Copenhagen. During most of this time he was working on the problem of how to describe the path of an electron using a matrix, which is a set of numbers use to plot the path of something. He was awarded the Nobel Physics Prize for his work in 1932.

He discovered the Uncertainty Principle in 1927, one of his most important pieces of work. The U.P. (Uncertainty Principle), summarized, states that one cannot know the exact position of something and its velocity (all this would tell you exactly where the object would be any given time) at the same time. You can find out one or the other, but you can never know both. This rule holds true for the most accurate measurements that we can take. The principle works because with each measurement that you take you disrupt the particle's path and the path of the particle that you used to measure the object. So, you can never accurately get both the position and velocity of an object due to the disruption caused by the measurement.

Another part of the U.P. states that the more accurately an object is scanned the more it is disrupted (this relates to the first part of the theory). This eventually causes the object to become completely disrupted before the scan is complete.

This has always been a stumbling block for scientists who are trying to find a solution to teleportation, because to teleport an object you first have to completely scan the object before teleporting it; but the Innsbruck team found a way of getting around this by using another aspect of quantum theory called the Einstein-Poldosky-Rosen Effect, or entanglement. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen discussed this effect in a paper. When two particles are entangled (say a pair of photons), the share the same properties at all times. If you entangled a pair of die, the dice would always turn up on the same number, no matter how far away they were from each other. And the number would still be completely random. Einstein called entanglement a "spooky action at a distance".

For many years it was thought that entanglement had no use, other than to prove the quantum theory, because quantum mechanics was the only field that could explain the bizarre behavior.

The Innsbruck team used the EPR Effect to bypass HUP by entangling the object to be teleported. That way all the unscanned information in the object would be passed to the teleported object through EPR.

The form of quantum teleportation that the scientists at Innsbruck came up with works like this. Alice wants to teleport an object A to her friend Bob. To do this she firsts entangles objects B and C. The n she sends object C to Bob. Once she knows Bob has object C she scans objects A and B together. This disrupts both of them and causes B's state to become equal to A's state (this part is difficult to comprehend). Now since A=B and B=C, A=C. Once this is done the scanned information is sent to Bob by conventional means (radio, ex.) and Bob processes object A, formerly object C, accordingly. In the scanning process the original object A is destroyed, ending in only one copy of object A, a classical teleportation.

This differs from a classical fax in that the original copy is destroyed in the process. Another major difference between the two is that teleportation takes three objects instead of just two.

The first action in the teleportation experiments done by the Innsbruck group is to create two entangled particles. This is done by sending a pulse of ultraviolet light through a type of crystal called a calcite crystal. This type of crystal is called a "non-linear crystal", probably because it splits photons (I wasn't able to find the definition). Inside of the crystal the UV photon is split into two photons whose polarization is entangled (polarization is the electrical charge of the photon. The polarization constantly changes). These first two photons are photons (objects) B and C. After the photons exit the crystal the UV pulse is reflected back through the crystal, while B and C are reflected to different stations. Photon C goes on to the receiving station where the teleported object will end up. Photon B is directed to the sending station. The pair of entangled photons are detected and the experiment starts. When the UV pulse is reflected back through the crystal photon A is created. A is sent to the sending station where a Bell-State measurement is performed on it and on photon B at the same time. A Bell-State measurement is the type of measurement the changes the state of C into the state of A. During the measurement A is scanned and the information is sent to the receiving station. There is a 25% chance that photon C will turn out exactly like A. So if the polarization is determined to be not the same polarization as A was it is sent through a crystal that will rotate its polarization until it matches A's (A's polarization could have been up, down, right, or left). The process has not been perfected yet and has a success rate of 75%.

The future of quantum computing is a promising one. Unfortunately, we won't be able to teleport humans in the foreseeable future. This is for a variety of reasons, all of them engineering. One of the problems is that the object to be teleported has to be completely isolated. That would be hard to do with a living organism. Another problem would be entangling the objects, although it could be done with large objects. Entanglement has already been demonstrated with Buckyballs, molecules made up of 60 atoms of carbon.

One of the most promising aspects of quantum teleportation would be in the field of quantum computing. Quantum computing is an experimental field of computing that uses atoms and molecules as bits. It is ultra-fast, about 1x10^9 times faster than today's super computers (the most powerful computer in the world could download the entire Internet in 2 seconds). This means that it would take a quantum computer 1 year for something that would take a conventional computer 1,000,000,000 years. Quantum computers have another advantage over conventional machines. Conventional computers will eventually hit physical limits or the facilities used to manufacture them will become too expensive to build.

Nobody thought much about the theory of quantum computing until 1994. A scientist named Peter Shor at AT&T discovered that how you could factor the prime factors of a number using a quantum computer much faster than with a conventional computer. The discovery fascinated scientists and horrified the security industry. It started off a wave of research in the field.

The great speed of quantum computers comes from the way they use atoms for qubits, or quantum bits. Unlike conventional computers a single qubit can represent more than one conventional bit. This is called superposition, or one thing representing more objects or ideas than just it. Qubits can do this because the atom or molecule that it is made up of can be made up of usually have more than one characteristic (ex. Electrical charge, spin axis, etc.) that fluctuate. Scientists control and measure the effects of these characteristics. They then are able to transform them into an extremely powerful computer.

In 1996 Neil Gershenfeld set out to build a quantum computer with a group at the University of California. Their first problem was to find a material that could be completely isolated and could have information entered, calculated, and measured with out decoherence occurring (decoherence occurs when an object or substance that is totally isolated interacts with outside forces or objects. This would cause calculation to become impossible in a quantum computer. It's like you were reading a book and then somebody started changing the script, ripping out some pages, added in new ones, and scribbled over other pages). The group then realized that liquids would be perfect, instead of isolating a single atom or molecule (this is for a very low powered quantum computer). Since all the molecules or atoms in the liquid would be the exact same, it wouldn't matter if the molecules interacted during the computations.

An atom's nucleus is constantly spinning like a gyroscope. The direction of the spin of the nucleus of an atom depends on the outside magnetic forces that are influencing it (like a magnet). The spin can either be parallel with the magnetic field (this would be like a gyroscope spinning on top of your finger, right side up) or anti-parallel (this is like a gyroscope spinning on your finger upside down). Now, when you apply an outside magnetic field, the spin axis of the nucleus will spin (like a gyroscope starting to wobble on your finger). If you turn a magnetic field on and off very fast it will cause the spin axis to completely rotate (you could rotate the spin axis 90 degrees or 180 degrees; it just depends on how long and how fast you turn the magnet off and on). Then, when you turn the magnet off the spins go out of alignment, until the magnet is turned on again. When the spins go out of alignment the atoms lose energy, which they emit in the form of radio waves. So if you rotated a spin 90 degrees it would give off a different amount of energy than if it had been rotated 180 degrees. The radio signals are picked up and translated by the same device that sent out the magnetic field. This process of manipulating and reading the energy emitted from the atoms is called NMR or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. It works exactly like a MRI does. Different frequencies of NMR affect atoms of different elements in different ways. Like a hydrogen atom might remain the same while a carbon atom is rotated.

In QC (quantum computing) the spin of an atom (parallel, 90 degrees, anti-parallel, and anti-parallel 90 degrees) stands for a qubit. Parallel equals 0,0, ninety degrees equals 0,1, anti-parallel equals 1,1, and anti-parallel 90 degrees equals 1,0. Scientists measure the energy levels emitted by the atoms and are able to tell what qubit an atom represents.

Another thing the spins of an atom are affected by is the spin of its neighboring atom. In molecules atoms of different atoms are often side by side. In the molecule of chlorophyll (CHCl3) the spin of the carbon atom is dictated by the spin of the hydrogen atom next to it. This could have been a liability to deal with while designing a qc (quantum computer) but instead it forms the basic unit of computing, called the logic gate. In a computer a logic gate data is processed. Microchips are made up of logic gates. The interactions of the carbon and hydrogen atom forms a type of logic gate, the exclusive-OR logic gate. This is sometimes called the controlled-NOT gate. A NOT logic gate is the simplest type of logic gate. All it does is inverts the input. On a controlled-NOT gate the output depends on the state of the inverter (the output will be different depending on the spin of the hydrogen atom). Once the spin of the carbon atom has been inverted it sends out a radio signal which the operator of translates into the output.

Using an array of these devices that are all coordinated together it would be possible to create a super supercomputer, billion times faster than today's super computers.

Quantum teleportation might eventually be used for transferring information between logic gates. It will be a while before we will be able to build a quantum computer that is fast enough to compete with today's fastest computers, but it will definitely be worth the wait. One huge advantage to qc is that they are much easier and cheaper to manufacture than conventional computers.


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1 posted on 12/20/2001 5:17:17 AM PST by Father Wu
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To: Father Wu
Nice read. You probably won't get very many replies though. Its a bit esoteric for this crowd.
2 posted on 12/20/2001 5:23:14 AM PST by AUgrad
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To: AUgrad
I hope you are including yourself in "this crowd".
3 posted on 12/20/2001 5:26:46 AM PST by Russ
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To: Father Wu;bitwhacker
Good read.

/john

4 posted on 12/20/2001 5:32:16 AM PST by JRandomFreeper
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To: Father Wu
Bump for later...After Coffee
5 posted on 12/20/2001 5:41:51 AM PST by DeckTheHallsHolly
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To: ahariail
Ping Me

Not to esoteric for this crowd, but to esoteric for this early in the morning

6 posted on 12/20/2001 5:43:24 AM PST by ahariail
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To: Father Wu
Very Funny, Scotty. Now beam down my clothes!
7 posted on 12/20/2001 5:44:48 AM PST by stainlessbanner
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To: Russ
I hope you are including yourself in "this crowd

Not really. I don't claim to fully understand all of the concepts discussed, but I minored in Physics in school so I have a general idea of what he is talking about. Before you get your feathers ruffled my comment wasn't a slight against anyone here. Most people are here to discuss politics. Few will take the time to read something that doesn't interest them.

8 posted on 12/20/2001 5:45:10 AM PST by AUgrad
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To: Father Wu
This is a very well written article, Father. I know because I was able to understand the entire thing while watching television, entertaining Christmas company, holding the dog's head in my lap, and keeping it from eating the cat. Oh--and the sun was in my eyes.
9 posted on 12/20/2001 5:45:36 AM PST by Savage Beast
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To: Father Wu
"He was born on December 5, 1901 in Wuzburg, Germany."

Can we be sure of that?

10 posted on 12/20/2001 5:45:39 AM PST by billorites
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To: Father Wu
How many Heisenbergs does it take to change a light bulb?

If you knew the answer, you wouldn't know where the light bulb is.<--Highlight text to see answer.

11 posted on 12/20/2001 5:47:36 AM PST by Nick Danger
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To: Father Wu
Very nice. I remember reading about the excitement in the Quantum Physics world in '94. I was following it with some excitement myself for a year or two, then it seemed to fade away (at least from the public documents that I had access to at the time). Nice to see that it is being pursued.

One fun part of the high factoring ability that a QC would have is the fact that it could work for high-level encryption, as well as against it (which the article seems to suggest). It would be fun to get ahold of one of these QC's if they ever become reality (in a mass production sense) and work out some new, really snazzy encryption algorithm on one, or at least try to implement a hard core version of an existing one on it.

Thanks for the fun read for the day!

12 posted on 12/20/2001 5:48:32 AM PST by Lumberjack
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To: AUgrad
This thread about quantum computing has 53 replies already this morning.
13 posted on 12/20/2001 5:49:03 AM PST by Arkle
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To: Arkle
This thread about quantum computing has 53 replies already this morning.

OK so I was wrong. Pardon my mistake. Please.

14 posted on 12/20/2001 5:51:21 AM PST by AUgrad
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Comment #15 Removed by Moderator

To: AUgrad
You would be amazed at the scope of the subjects to be found on FR.
16 posted on 12/20/2001 5:59:01 AM PST by CaptRon
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To: thud
ping
17 posted on 12/20/2001 6:05:23 AM PST by Dark Wing
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To: Father Wu; dighton

18 posted on 12/20/2001 6:06:30 AM PST by Orual
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To: Nick Danger
But if I read the answer don't I change it?
19 posted on 12/20/2001 6:08:04 AM PST by jalisco555
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Bump for later.
20 posted on 12/20/2001 6:09:13 AM PST by StriperSniper
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To: AUgrad
I'm not sure what kind of replies you expect when you say it is "too esoteric" for here. "I disagree with Werner Heisenburg and the uncertainty principle."? "Peter Shor was full of hooey."? I mean, there's not much to debate about this topic. The bottom line seems to be, good for computers (in maybe 50 or 100 years), bad for transporting people. All very nice, but it doesn't seem to have many practical implications during most of our lifetimes.
21 posted on 12/20/2001 6:12:56 AM PST by KellyAdmirer
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To: KellyAdmirer
esoteric: of or relating to a small group.

I didn't believe there would be very many people interested in discussing this topic on this ( a mainly political) forum. I have obviously been proven quite wrong on that point.

This article only discusses one of the possible applications of quantum computing. There are many other ways that quantum computing can be rendered useful that don't present the monumental engineering challenges that teleportation does.

22 posted on 12/20/2001 6:24:03 AM PST by AUgrad
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To: Father Wu
I hate to get nit-picky here, but if the original object A is destroyed in the process, replaced with a perfect copy, A', at the end, how can this be construed to be teleporting? While that difference may be academic when applied to fundamental particles, it still cannot be argued to transport the original A, but to duplicate A out of something else at another point.

There is nothing in the HUP or other theories that I am aware of that would contradict the concept of generating a unique 1 to 1 relationship that (in concept) could uniquely tag the original A, and I do not see how that tag could be transported to A'. Just because a given particle, C, has identical attributes to A, does not make it A. It leaves it C that is identical to A.

I can see arguments on the author's side of this for fundamental particles, but I think his extrapolation that it "proves" the concept of teleportation for complex systems, is false.

In my mind it comes down to the basic question of "if something is mathematically possible, is it necessarilly possible?" I have been wrestling with that one for awhile, but my sense of it is that the answer is "no". My strongest argument to date for my position has a ready example in the potential energy function, E=mgh, for gravitational fields. I have concluded that potential energy is nonsense, and the fact that a simple (and more complex) mathematical equation describes it well is an illusion made possible by incomplete understanding, much as Newton's laws are merely approximations and do not really describe reality.

23 posted on 12/20/2001 6:28:03 AM PST by lafroste
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To: Father Wu
I've read before, that a related method could be used for sending messages that you do not want intercepted.

The message is encoded by photon spin. The beauty of the idea is that the message is sent in a way such
that it is impossible to intercept the message without both sides (the sender and receiver) knowing about it.

24 posted on 12/20/2001 6:30:59 AM PST by avg_freeper
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To: AUgrad
What I got out of it I thought was pretty cool.
25 posted on 12/20/2001 6:33:34 AM PST by Tribune7
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To: KellyAdmirer
All very nice, but it doesn't seem to have many practical implications during most of our lifetimes.

Key word is 'seem'. One hundred years ago it didn't seem that any one could conceive of the Internet, but here it is. With the always ascending technology curve time to meaningful technology advancements shrinks.

Nanotechnology should arrive in fifteen to twenty years. In thirty years it will be in nearly every industry plus industries not yet known. 

26 posted on 12/20/2001 6:34:51 AM PST by Zon
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To: Father Wu
Terrific read. I'm reminded of that unusual statement, "Quanta is all there ever was, is and will be. If you don't know quanta, your ignorance is complete.")
27 posted on 12/20/2001 6:37:31 AM PST by TheEdge
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To: lafroste
much as Newton's laws are merely approximations and do not really describe reality

Don't Einstein's laws (using Quantum measures) match what is theoretically possible much more closely than Newton?

28 posted on 12/20/2001 6:37:37 AM PST by AUgrad
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To: Father Wu
A good analogy of how a teleporter works is that it works like a 3-D fax machine.

Would that be a 4-D fax machine in the case where the original object does not disappear ("some authors explore the possibility that the original object doesn't disappear, resulting in there being two sets of the same thing"?

29 posted on 12/20/2001 6:39:26 AM PST by FairWitness
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To: FairWitness
Would that be a 4-D fax machine in the case where the original object does not disappear

What would the fourth dimension be?

30 posted on 12/20/2001 6:40:52 AM PST by AUgrad
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To: Zon
plus industries not yet known.

One interesting place that nano-tech will be is medicine. Consider gradually replacing human neurons with engineered replacements that don't wear out or die. When the process is complete, do you have a human brain analog that lasts (effectively) forever? Is imortality within our grasp? (except for the "Hey ya'll, watch this" crowd)

/john

31 posted on 12/20/2001 6:42:43 AM PST by JRandomFreeper
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To: lafroste
The way I see it, and I'll use a complex object as example is that, what does it matter to a person that wants to "travel" to a civilization at the other side of the Milky Way if the information of himself is instantaneously recreated via quantum entanglement on that distant civilization? He didn't travel anywhere but for all he knows as he stands among the distant civilization is that he is really there and no longer here.
32 posted on 12/20/2001 6:43:24 AM PST by Zon
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To: AUgrad
What would the fourth dimension be?

t

/john

33 posted on 12/20/2001 6:43:53 AM PST by JRandomFreeper
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To: FairWitness
Refresh my memory. Didn't I read in Science News a little bit ago that scientists already "teleported" a small frog (?).

A little frog was seen here . . . and here!

34 posted on 12/20/2001 6:44:31 AM PST by TheEdge
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To: AUgrad
What would the fourth dimension be?

The generally accepted answer is that the fourth dimension is time. The more interesting question is "what is the fifth dimension?" (And no smart remarks about the musical group please)

35 posted on 12/20/2001 6:45:48 AM PST by lafroste
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To: Father Wu
One of the things I was taught in Chemistry is that there is no such thing as "action at a distance". In other words, chemistry happens only when atoms (or more accurately, their electron "clouds") touch each other. On the other hand, at least some of what I have heard of quantum physics (which is admittedly not a lot) indicates that that is not necessarily true for elementary particle physics. Fascinating (in my best Spock imitation).
36 posted on 12/20/2001 6:46:35 AM PST by FairWitness
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To: AUgrad
I don't understand very much about this but one thing I am able to do here on FR is learn. I appreciate the post and apologize if I seemed to become "ruffled". Actually, I'll admit your comment rubbed me the wrong way but your explanation cleared that up. Thanks!
37 posted on 12/20/2001 6:49:06 AM PST by Russ
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To: AUgrad
"You probably won't get very many replies though. "

I disagree. These quantum physics threads usually go fairly long.

38 posted on 12/20/2001 6:49:33 AM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts
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To: Zon
The way I see it, and I'll use a complex object as example is that, what does it matter to a person that wants to "travel" to a civilization at the other side of the Milky Way if the information of himself is instantaneously recreated via quantum entanglement on that distant civilization?

The problem IMHO is that all this ignores the essence of what it is to be human, ie. a spirit. How can a physical process, no matter how sophisticated, act on that which is not subject to physical law? At this point, science and philosophy will have to be reconciled (in other words, it is still a long way off).

39 posted on 12/20/2001 6:49:45 AM PST by lafroste
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To: lafroste
The generally accepted answer is that the fourth dimension is time. The more interesting question is "what is the fifth dimension?" (And no smart remarks about the musical group please)

You're getting over my head. I don't understand how time could be a dimension in this sense.

40 posted on 12/20/2001 6:51:02 AM PST by AUgrad
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To: Father Wu
I find this fascinating even though I have not one hour of education on quantum physics. Sounds to me like they may be getting at how the creator "created" us. But of course, since many deny the creator, they miss this intriguing point.
41 posted on 12/20/2001 6:54:18 AM PST by dubyagee
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To: AUgrad
If you look at dimensions as if they were coordinate axes in a geometry problem, then you already can see that the location of any point can be uniquely described by its coordinates, (x,y,z). However, a fourth coordinate can be employed to say when it was there. If the object is moving, then its (x,y,z) changes with time, and its position can be fully described by knowing (x,y,z,t).
42 posted on 12/20/2001 6:56:42 AM PST by lafroste
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To: billorites
I saw a sign over a bed at an inn in Haigerloch. It said,

"Heisenberg may have slept here."

43 posted on 12/20/2001 7:00:05 AM PST by Erasmus
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To: billorites
"He was born on December 5, 1901 in Wuzburg, Germany." Can we be sure of that? Yes, because his weight was over five pounds.
44 posted on 12/20/2001 7:03:53 AM PST by TopQuark
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To: lafroste
If you look at dimensions as if they were coordinate axes in a geometry problem, then you already can see that the location of any point can be uniquely described by its coordinates, (x,y,z). However, a fourth coordinate can be employed to say when it was there. If the object is moving, then its (x,y,z) changes with time, and its position can be fully described by knowing (x,y,z,t).

I understand that. It is a simple differential equation. I was trying to apply the fax machine analogy to a quantum equation. If true teleportation was achieved there would be no A' thus the time factor ,wait ,I believe I understand now. The time dimension would not be the problem, the "fifth" dimension would. Wow, my brain hasn't worked this hard in a while.

45 posted on 12/20/2001 7:05:44 AM PST by AUgrad
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To: jalisco555
But if I read the answer don't I change it? The answers are immaterial, arn't they?
46 posted on 12/20/2001 7:05:45 AM PST by TopQuark
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To: lafroste
The problem IMHO is that all this ignores the essence of what it is to be human, ie. a spirit.

You have summarized it exactly, lafroste. In teleporting and reassembling all of the quanta which constitute a living human being, what happens to the animating spirit - the soul, which dwells within the bodily vessel ? One might ask the same question concerning a more technologically imminent development, a human clone. Is the soul somehow partitioned betweed the two ( or more ) bodies ? Do we somehow even more gravely usurp the Creator's role by claiming to create both body and soul of such new beings ?

47 posted on 12/20/2001 7:07:31 AM PST by Dukie
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To: kd5cts
Is immortality within our grasp?

Yes. Even before nanotechnology arrives gene therapy and DNA manipulation will be pushing the envelope towards immortality. People in the various related fields measure life expectancy by how many years are added to a persons expected life to the measure of time it takes to achieve the next life-extension breakthrough. That is, a new technique takes two year to develop that adds one year life extension. Eventually, and not that long, perhaps in the next ten years the rate of life extension progress will be be adding years quicker than we age.

For example, say life expectancy is 80 years and next year life expectancy is increased to 82 years via "X" technology. The person has passed beyond the point of every reaching an expected death-date so long as life extension technology continues advancing. So the following year the person is another year older but life-extension technology has pushed life expectancy to 85 years. The person lived one year and during that time gained three expected years of life.

A very important aspect of achieving immortality is being able to store a persons "I-ness" (sense of self-awareness) and all aspects of the mind off site (some sort of specialized database) so that if an accident kills the person not only can the body be brought back to life but the mind will be restored as well.

48 posted on 12/20/2001 7:08:18 AM PST by Zon
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To: Father Wu
So! Dr. McCoy was right. According to ST sci fi lore, he was violently opposed to use of the transporter for humans because of the theory that the transported person was destroyed (killed!) and a new person created in their place - raising questions regarding the very existence of the human soul.
49 posted on 12/20/2001 7:08:26 AM PST by Harrison Bergeron
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To: Father Wu
You wrote this? Impressive if so.
50 posted on 12/20/2001 7:11:24 AM PST by Justa
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